Global ClustersCodeSub-domainTitleDescriptionUnit of MeasurementUnit DescriptionDenominatorNumeratorDisaggregationKey indicatorTypesResponse MonitoringStandardsThresholdGuidance on phasesPhase applicabilityGeneral guidanceGuidance for pre-crisis/baselineCommentsData SourcesSector cross-tagging
Food Security;Health;Logistics;Protection;Nutrition;Water Sanitation Hygiene;Camp Coordination / Management;Education;Emergency Shelter and NFI;Emergency Telecommunications;Early RecoveryAAP-1Feedback MechanismsNumber of feedback received (including complaints) which have been acted uponFeedback mechanisms provide a means for all those affected to comment on and thus indirectly influence programme planning and implementation (see HAP’s ‘participation’ benchmark). They include focus group discussions, surveys, interviews and meetings on ‘lessons learnt’ with a representative sample of all the affected population (see ECB’s Good Enough Guide for tools and Guidance notes 3–4). The findings and the agency’s actions in response to feedback should be systematically shared with the affected population.InstitutionNumberN/ANumber of organisations with formal feedback mechanisms in placeYesProcessYesHAP Benchmark 3 on Sharing information, Sphere Core Standard 1: People-centered humanitarian response, The Good Enough Guide - Section 5: Use feedback to improve project impactAll PhasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Feedback mechanisms can take many forms. Whatever the most appropriate channels are should be used; radio talk back programmes, online surveys, sms and twitter inputs, regularised focus group discussions with selected members of the population, suggestions and complaints boxes, designation of sector or camp committees to feedback on specific topics, prioritisation assessments, through dedicated community engagement staff among many other possibilities. Sex, age, ability or other relevant diversity disaggregation of the feedback received is important in order to understand who is most at risk and to take responsible actions. It is important to remember that feedback needs to be collected, digested and acted upon, and then the results of those actions relayed to the population, then another round of feedback can begin on the changed situation. This is the 'feedback loop' - an ongoing dialogue between the humanitarian community and the affected population. Remember that much of this is already happening - through food monitors, community outreach programmes, ongoing assessments - the important thing is to keep the feedback loop continuing.• Clusters and partners have a formal, appropriate feedback mechanism in place that is discussed and agreed with key stakeholders and publicly communicated. • The feedback mechanism employed is appropriate and robust enough to deal with (communicate, receive, process, respond to and learn from) complaints. • Clusters and Lead Agencies/Advisory Groups (SAG) have oversight of feedback (incl. complaints) mechanism and learn from and react to information received. Agencies, NGOs, Government, Media, etc(C) Camp Coordination / Management, C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C1.1 Displacement Site Managers, C1.2 CCCM Mechanisms, C2 Population information management, C2.1 CCCM Mechanisms, C2.2 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, C2.3 Service Provision, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.1 Displacement Site Managers, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C3.4 Service Provision - Protection, C3.5 Service Provision - Food and Nutrition, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, C3.7 Protection, C3.8 Access and Movement, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, C3.10 Service Provision - Health, C3.11 Service Provision - Shelter, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, C4.1 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, (E) Education, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E1.1 Equal Access, E1.2 Facilities and services, E1.3 Protection and Well-being, E2 Teaching and Learning, E2.1 Curricula, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, E3.1 Law and Policy Formulation, E3.2 Recruitment and Selection, E3.3 Supervision, E4 Educational Policy, E4.1 Law and Policy Formulation, (F) Food Security, F1 Food Assistance, F1.1 Cash Transfer, F1.2 Voucher Transfer, F1.3 In-kind Transfer, F1.4 Livelihood Recovery, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F2.1 Cash Transfer, F2.2 Voucher Transfer, F2.3 In-kind Transfer, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F6.1 Food Availability and Agriculture, F6.2 Livestock, F7 Utilization, F8 Agriculture and Livestock, (H) Health, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H3 Communicable diseases, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H4.1 STI & HIV, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H4.3 Sexual violence, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, H6 Environmental Health, (L) Logistics, L1 Volume, L2 Weight, (N) Nutrition, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N1.1 SAM, N1.2 MAM, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, (P) Protection, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children, PC8 Justice for Children, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG2 Develop/apply SOPs context specific, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PG4 Advocacy, awareness, education with affected populations, local authorities, international community, PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, PG6 Prevention Programming, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, PL1 HLP Documentation, PL2 Access to Land, PL3 HLP Disputes, PL4 Security of tenure for informal rights holders or vulnerable groups, P4 (PM) Mine Action, PM1 Clearance of Mines and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW), PM2 Mine and ERW risk education, PM3 Stockpile destruction, PM4 Victim Assistance, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, S1 Shelter, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, (T) Emergency Telecommunications, T1 ICT Performance, T2 ETC Coordination, (W) Water Sanitation Hygiene, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W2 Water Supply, W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality, W2.3 Water Facilities, W3 Excreta Disposal, W3.1 Environment, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation
Food Security;Health;Logistics;Protection;Nutrition;Water Sanitation Hygiene;Camp Coordination / Management;Education;Emergency Shelter and NFI;Emergency Telecommunications;Early RecoveryAAP-2Sharing InformationNumber of information products distributed to the affected population through a variety of mechanisms on humanitarian program planning, functioning and progressPeople have a right to accurate and updated information about actions taken on their behalf. Information can reduce anxiety and is an essential foundation of community responsibility and ownership. At a minimum, clusters and agencies should provide a description of the cluster's role and responsibilities, agency’s mandate and project(s), the population’s entitlements and rights, and when and where to access assistance (see HAP’s ‘sharing information’ benchmark). (Sphere Core Standard 1, Guidance Note 4) Possible examples:CommunityNumberN/A# of information messages deliveredYesProcessYesHAP Benchmark 3 on Sharing information, Sphere Core Standard 1: People-centered humanitarian responseAll PhasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Common ways of sharing information include noticeboards, public meetings, schools, newspapers, SMS 'blasts', FAQ flyers or radio and TV broadcasts. The information should demonstrate considered understanding of people’s situations and be conveyed in local language(s), using a variety of adapted media so that it is accessible to all those concerned. For example, use spoken communications or pictures for children and adults who cannot read, use uncomplicated language (i.e. understandable to local 12-year-old) and employ a large typeface when printing information for people with visual impairments. Manage meetings so that older people or those with hearing difficulties can hear. Sex, age, ability or other relevant diversity must be considered when preparing information products as is important in order to understand who is able to access information.• Information about an organisation’s or cluster’s mission, values, legal status and contact details. • Information about projects, plans and activities (in particular beneficiary selection criteria and relevant financial information). • Regular reports of actual performance in relation to previously agreed goals. • Specific details for making comments, suggestions or complaints about the cluster or agency’s activities (preferably a named member of staff). Agencies, NGOs, Government(C) Camp Coordination / Management, C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C1.1 Displacement Site Managers, C1.2 CCCM Mechanisms, C2 Population information management, C2.1 CCCM Mechanisms, C2.2 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, C2.3 Service Provision, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.1 Displacement Site Managers, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C3.4 Service Provision - Protection, C3.5 Service Provision - Food and Nutrition, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, C3.7 Protection, C3.8 Access and Movement, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, C3.10 Service Provision - Health, C3.11 Service Provision - Shelter, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, C4.1 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, (E) Education, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E1.1 Equal Access, E1.2 Facilities and services, E1.3 Protection and Well-being, E2 Teaching and Learning, E2.1 Curricula, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, E3.1 Law and Policy Formulation, E3.2 Recruitment and Selection, E3.3 Supervision, E4 Educational Policy, E4.1 Law and Policy Formulation, (F) Food Security, F1 Food Assistance, F1.1 Cash Transfer, F1.2 Voucher Transfer, F1.3 In-kind Transfer, F1.4 Livelihood Recovery, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F2.1 Cash Transfer, F2.2 Voucher Transfer, F2.3 In-kind Transfer, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F6.1 Food Availability and Agriculture, F6.2 Livestock, F7 Utilization, F8 Agriculture and Livestock, (H) Health, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H3 Communicable diseases, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H4.1 STI & HIV, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H4.3 Sexual violence, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, H6 Environmental Health, (L) Logistics, L1 Volume, L2 Weight, (N) Nutrition, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N1.1 SAM, N1.2 MAM, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, (P) Protection, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children, PC8 Justice for Children, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG2 Develop/apply SOPs context specific, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PG4 Advocacy, awareness, education with affected populations, local authorities, international community, PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, PG6 Prevention Programming, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, PL1 HLP Documentation, PL2 Access to Land, PL3 HLP Disputes, PL4 Security of tenure for informal rights holders or vulnerable groups, P4 (PM) Mine Action, PM1 Clearance of Mines and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW), PM2 Mine and ERW risk education, PM3 Stockpile destruction, PM4 Victim Assistance, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, S1 Shelter, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, (T) Emergency Telecommunications, T1 ICT Performance, T2 ETC Coordination, (W) Water Sanitation Hygiene, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W2 Water Supply, W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality, W2.3 Water Facilities, W3 Excreta Disposal, W3.1 Environment, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation
Food Security;Health;Logistics;Protection;Nutrition;Water Sanitation Hygiene;Camp Coordination / Management;Education;Emergency Shelter and NFI;Emergency Telecommunications;Early RecoveryAAP-3ParticipationNumber of persons consulted (disaggregated by sex/age) before designing a program/project [alternatively: while implementing the program/project] Participation in design of assessments, programmes, evaluations etc, means that a selected segment(s) of the affected populaiton have a direct influence on decision making.  Measures should be taken to ensure the participation of members of all groups of affected people – young and old, men and women. Special efforts should be made to include people who are not well represented, are marginalised (e.g. by ethnicity or religion) or otherwise ‘invisible’ (e.g. housebound or in an institution).InstitutionNumberN/Anumber of persons consultedYesProcessYesHAP Benchmark 4 on Participation, Sphere Core Standard 1: People-centered humanitarian response, The Good Enough Guide - Tool 3: How to involve people throughout the projectAll PhasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Understanding and addressing the barriers to participation faced by different people is critical to balanced participation. How a cluster or organisation enables key stakeholders to play an active role in the decision-making processes that affect them. It is unrealistic to expect an organisation to engage with all stakeholders over all decisions all of the time. Therefore the organisation must have clear guidelines (and practices) enabling it to prioritize stakeholders appropriately and to be responsive to the differences in power between them. Mechanisms need to be in place to ensure that the most marginalized and affected are represented and have influence. Participation here also encompasses the processes through which an organisation or cluster monitors and reviews its progress and results against goals and objectives; feeds learning back into the organisation on an on-going basis; and reports on the results of the process. To increase accountability to stakeholders, goals and objectives must be also designed in consultation with those stakeholders. A well known example of participation in developing indicators is the WASH indicator developed by a community which was - "# of hours girls spend in school" - highlighting the importance of education to the community, and also that improved water access had improved education possibilities. So the indicator has a measurement of impact built into it, the improved water access as an outcome can be assumed.• Organisations document how it speaks with a balanced cross-section of representatives from the affected communities. • Agency has a verifiable record of how communities (or their representatives) are demonstrably involved and influential in decision-making, implementation and judgement of impact throughout the lifetime of a project. • Agency has mechanisms in place to monitor and evaluate outcomes and impact and these are reported against (incl. to affected communities). • Cluster has a verifiable record of how it identified interest groups in the affected communities, and the power relationships that exist. Agencies, NGOs, Government(C) Camp Coordination / Management, C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C1.1 Displacement Site Managers, C1.2 CCCM Mechanisms, C2 Population information management, C2.1 CCCM Mechanisms, C2.2 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, C2.3 Service Provision, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.1 Displacement Site Managers, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C3.4 Service Provision - Protection, C3.5 Service Provision - Food and Nutrition, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, C3.7 Protection, C3.8 Access and Movement, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, C3.10 Service Provision - Health, C3.11 Service Provision - Shelter, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, C4.1 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, (E) Education, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E1.1 Equal Access, E1.2 Facilities and services, E1.3 Protection and Well-being, E2 Teaching and Learning, E2.1 Curricula, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, E3.1 Law and Policy Formulation, E3.2 Recruitment and Selection, E3.3 Supervision, E4 Educational Policy, E4.1 Law and Policy Formulation, (F) Food Security, F1 Food Assistance, F1.1 Cash Transfer, F1.2 Voucher Transfer, F1.3 In-kind Transfer, F1.4 Livelihood Recovery, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F2.1 Cash Transfer, F2.2 Voucher Transfer, F2.3 In-kind Transfer, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F6.1 Food Availability and Agriculture, F6.2 Livestock, F7 Utilization, F8 Agriculture and Livestock, (H) Health, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H3 Communicable diseases, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H4.1 STI & HIV, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H4.3 Sexual violence, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, H6 Environmental Health, (L) Logistics, L1 Volume, L2 Weight, (N) Nutrition, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N1.1 SAM, N1.2 MAM, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, (P) Protection, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children, PC8 Justice for Children, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG2 Develop/apply SOPs context specific, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PG4 Advocacy, awareness, education with affected populations, local authorities, international community, PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, PG6 Prevention Programming, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, PL1 HLP Documentation, PL2 Access to Land, PL3 HLP Disputes, PL4 Security of tenure for informal rights holders or vulnerable groups, P4 (PM) Mine Action, PM1 Clearance of Mines and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW), PM2 Mine and ERW risk education, PM3 Stockpile destruction, PM4 Victim Assistance, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, S1 Shelter, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, (T) Emergency Telecommunications, T1 ICT Performance, T2 ETC Coordination, (W) Water Sanitation Hygiene, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W2 Water Supply, W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality, W2.3 Water Facilities, W3 Excreta Disposal, W3.1 Environment, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-09C2.1 CCCM MechanismsNumber and percentage of displacement sites where de-registration/ departure is monitoredDe-registration/departure should be monitored but not controlled in order to adequately calculate needs within the displacement site and plan accordingly. Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of displacement sites where de-registration/ departure is monitoredDisplacement site; sex, age, disability, and other diversity concerns of departed IDPsNoOutputYesCamp Management Toolkit (Chapter 7)New L3 Emergency - Phase 4Phase 4De-registration/departure should be monitored but not controlled in order to adequately calculate needs within the displacement siteDTM, Site Manager RecordsC2 Population information management, (P) Protection, R4 Governance, S1 Shelter, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy
Food SecurityF-4F3 Food AccessCoping StrategiesCan be measured by several indicatos like the reduced Coping Strategy Index, the Household Hunger Scale or similar hunger experience indicator. Also the livelihood component can be included. HouseholdHouseholdLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, Sphere: Food security and nutrition assessment standard 1: Food security (Guidance note 8 on coping strategies), Sphere: Food security chapter, Annex 1: Food Security and livelihoods assessment checklists (baseline), Sphere: Food security - livelihoods standards, Sphere: Food security standard 1: General food security (Guidance Note 3 on Risks associated with coping strategies)P5 Vulnerability, S3.2 Assistance, W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-5F3 Food AccessChange in main source of incomethe changes occurred to the income derived from any given sources. It is imperative to have pre-crisis information to be able to value it. Example of sources of income can include crop production, wage labour, trading, livestock, fishery, exploitation of natural resources, salary and remittances. HouseholdHouseholdGeography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, Sphere: Food security chapter, Annex 1: Food Security and livelihoods assessment checklists (baseline), Sphere: Food security - livelihoods standardsSignficant Change. To be compared with pre-crisis baselineAppropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergency Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Specify what is intended by staple food; levels / threshold will vary according to context.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy, W7 Aggravating Factors
ProtectionP-15(P) ProtectionPercentage of communities that indicate deliberate exclusion from services for a specific group (i.e. children, disabled, minority groups) Communitygeographic unit YesBaseline, OutputC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, F3 Food Access, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery, S1.1 Access, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation
ProtectionP1-PC6-1PC6 Child LabourPercentage of surveyed communities who indictate the involvement of children in worst forms of child labourWorst form of child labour is a term defined in the ILO convention no. 182. It must be prohibited for all people under the age of 18 yrs and includes the following: (i) all forms of slavery and practices similar to slavery; (ii) using, offering, procuring a child for prostitution, production of pornographie or for pornographic performance; (iii) using, procuring, offering a child for illicit activities; (iv) hazardous work CommunityPercentage# of surveyed communities# of surveyed communities who have reported involvement of children in worst forms of child labourAge / Sex; In phase 4 disaggregate by type of labourYesBaseline, OutcomeNoA CPRA is recommended for collecting this indicator before and after the responseChild Protection Rapid Assessment (CPRA)C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, H6 Environmental Health, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
ProtectionP1-PC6-2PC6 Child LabourPercentage of surveyed community members are aware of the danger and consequences of the Worst Forms of Child LabourWorst form of child labour is a term defined in the ILO convention no. 182. It must be prohibited for all people under the age of 18 yrs and includes the following: (i) all forms of slavery and practices similar to slavery; (ii) using, offering, procuring a child for prostitution, production of pornographie or for pornographic performance; (iii) using, procuring, offering a child for illicit activities; (iv) hazardous work; Depending on the country context this indicator should specify which forms of child labour are meant to be assessed and the knowledge thereof by the community CommunityPercentage# of surveyed communities# of communities that are aware of the danger and consequences of the Worst Forms of Child LabourGeography, role of community member interviewedNoOutputYes0.8This indicator is linked to information campaigns and awareness raising efforts.SurveyC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E2 Teaching and Learning, F1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, H6 Environmental Health, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
ProtectionP2-PG6-2PG6 Prevention ProgrammingPercentage of humanitarian organizations and service providers that have in place codes of conduct on prevention of sexual exploitation and abuse by own staffFacilityn/a YesBaseline, OutcomeNote: PSEA is not just a Protection or GBV issue. All actors in disaster relief must be aware of the risk of sexual violence including sexual exploitation and abuse by humanitarians, and must work to prevent and respond to it (Guidance Note 3: sexual violence)C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E4 Educational Policy, F1 Food Assistance, F7 Utilization, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H6 Environmental Health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P7 Documentation, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R4 Governance, S1 Shelter, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation
ProtectionP2-PG6-3PG6 Prevention ProgrammingPercentage of humanitarian organizations and service providers that have in place community-based feedback and complaint mechanismsFacilityn/a YesBaseline, OutcomeNote: PSEA is not just a Protection or GBV issue. All actors in disaster relief must be aware of the risk of sexual violence including sexual exploitation and abuse by humanitarians, and must work to prevent and respond to it (Guidance Note 3: sexual violence)C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E4 Educational Policy, F1 Food Assistance, F7 Utilization, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H6 Environmental Health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P7 Documentation, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R4 Governance, S1 Shelter, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation
ProtectionP3-PL2-1PL2 Access to LandNumber and Percentage of surveyed persons/communities reporting a situation of forced evictionHouseholds or CommunitiesNumber and PercentageTotal # of persons / communities surveyed# of surveyed persons / communities reporting a situation of forced evictionGeographic; Administrative; Type of displacement site; Age; Sex; Specific groups / categories of persons (ethnicity, religion, disability; etc.); Individual status (i.e. refugee, IDP, host community); Type of situation reported (risk-incident of forced eviction)YesBaseline, OutcomeYesAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Situation of forced eviction can either refer to both the oral or written communication from local authorities, private owners etc.. of a threat/risk of being evicted as well as the incident itself of forced eviction. Forced eviction is defined as the permanent or temporary removal against their will of individuals, families and/or communities from the homes and/or lands which they occupy, without the provision of, and access to, appropriate forms of legal or other protection. Forced evictions can result from a broad range of situation such as for example: conflicts in which eviction, housing demolition and displacement are used as a weapon of war, for ethnic cleansing and population transfer; armed conflict characterized by targeting of civilians homes, including for collective punishment; lack of legal security of tenure, adequate protective legislation and/or their implementation; non-deliverance or non-recognition of titles over land and housing; changes related to housing and land in countries in transition. The scope of the issue of forced eviction is context-specific and should be defined at country level.C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, R4 Governance, S1 Shelter, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy
ProtectionP3-PL2-2PL2 Access to LandNumber and Percentage of surveyed persons / communities provided with support in situation of forced evictionHouseholds or CommunitiesNumber and PercentageTotal # of persons / communities surveyed# persons / communities provided with support in situation of forced evictionGeographic; Administrative; Type of displacement site; Age; Sex; Specific groups / categories of persons (ethnicity, religion, disability; etc.); Individual status (i.e. refugee, IDP, host community); Type of situation reported (risk-incident of forced eviction)NoOutputYesAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Support can be provided before, during and after a forced eviction. When a risk / threat of forced eviction has been communicated and before it occurs, a number of actions can be taken such as consultations with all parties involved to prevent the eviction or to identify appropriate alternatives. During an eviction, support aims at mitigating harm and suffering. After an eviction, continued support is provided to ensure access to remedies such as compensation of all material or non-material losses..C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, R4 Governance, S1 Shelter, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy
ProtectionP5-1P5 VulnerabilityPercentage of female-headed householdsFemale heads of household can be especially vulnerable to certain types of GBV, such as sexual exploitation and abuse. HouseholdPercentage female headedtotal # of households# female-headed householdsGeographic unit YesBaseline, OutputC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, F3 Food Access, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery, S1.1 Access, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
ProtectionP5-10P5 VulnerabilityPercentage/number of reported incidence of intentional physical violence and other harmful practices [broken down by victim]CommunitySADDYesBaselineNoC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F3 Food Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
ProtectionP5-11P5 VulnerabilityPercentage of survivors of intentional physical violence and other harmful practices who are referred for supportIndividualSADDYesBaseline, OutputYesNeed to be disaggregated by age/gender; support is any service provision as defined by the country within the referral mechanims, i.e. legal, medical, psychosocial etc. C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F3 Food Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
ProtectionP5-2 P5 VulnerabilityPercentage of child headed householdsHouseholdgeographic unit ; sex and age YesBaseline, OutputC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H2 Child health, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery, S1.1 Access, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
ProtectionP5-3P5 VulnerabilityPercentage of older people in need of assistance who are receiving specific supportdefinition of older people depends on context Individualsex/age/geographic unitYesOutputC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery, S1.1 Access, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
ProtectionP5-4P5 VulnerabilityPercentage of persons with disabilities identified in need of assistance who are receiving specific supportdisabitilites includes mental and physical disabilities Individualage/sex/geographic unit; type of supportYesOutput"Persons with disabilities" include those who have long-term or temporary physical, mental, intellectual or sensory impairments which, in interaction with various barriers, may hinder their full and effective participation in society on an equal basis with others.C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E4 Educational Policy, F3 Food Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery, S1.1 Access, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
ProtectionP5-9P5 VulnerabilityPercentage of communities reporting the incidence of cases of abuse, violence or exploitation in need of assistance receiving support CommunitySADD/type of assistance YesBaseline, OutputNoa minimum requirement is that assistance is provided by same sex as appropriate and children are assisted by specialized partnersC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F3 Food Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
ProtectionP6-2P6 Displacement and ReturnNumber of [or percentage of] IDPs/affected population/returnees registeredDepending on the country context the indicator will trace number of total IDPs or the number of the "affected population" or returnees Communityage/sex YesBaseline, OutputDefinition for targeted/affected population etc. should be taken from the IASC Guidance on Humanitarian Profile C2 Population information management, F1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
Early RecoveryR-1R4 GovernanceNumber and Percentage of public sector employees (male/female) unavailable because of crisis by gender/grade or postNumber of public sector employees is one of crucial proxy indicators to the functioning of government in post crisis setting. Public sector employees may be unavailable because they or their families are directly affected by mortality or injury because of the crisis. They may also not be at work because their workplace building has been damaged or destroyed, because they cannot use transport networks to access their workplace, or because insecurity does not permit travel to work. EmployeesNumber and Percentage# of public sector employees pre-crisis# of public sector employeesa) general administration; b) civil registry; c) justice; d) civil protection; e) security; f) sex by gradeYesBaselineYesn/aPhase 1: Different data collection modules: i) To the extent possible obtain official figure from the treasury at central level or local level if possible; ii) Figures can be obtained from the media. Where possible obtain numbers of personnel from at least three separate sources and take the average. Obtain at least global data and disaggregated by sectors only when possible. Phase 2: Obtain data from authoritative / formal sources, determine the number at pre crisis level of employment, determine number at current level. Phase 3: Obtain data from authoritative / formal sources and corroborate with other formal reports/records. Phase 4: Conduct In-depth analysis based on formal records of the government disaggregated by sectorsPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4"Public sector" refer to sectors funded by a government budget at all levels of government, from national to local, within the defined areas affected by the crisis. "Available" refers to those being employed on regular basis of at least one month tenure. Data for this indicator can be available either at the administrative offices, the office where they should be working, or at the treasury.Data is usually available from past government reports or census.Number of public sector employees is one of crucial proxy indicators to the functioning of government in post crisis setting. Personnel management or human resources is a key component of public sector. As public sectors employees are often also affected by critical events, their availability is also affected. As situation stabilizes more employees are reaching the pre-crisis level.Government dataC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, F3 Food Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage
Early RecoveryR-13R2 Basic Infrastructure RestorationNumber and Percentage of population with access to basic community infrastructure not covered by other sectors or clusters, e.g. police stations, town halls, administrative buildings. Schools (if not covered by Edu), playgrounds, parksThe types of basic community infrastructure that is covered by the Early Recovery cluster will be decided in-country by the relevant cluster coordinators.  The accessibility of ER structures must then be estimated: access in disasters can be limited by the damage or destruction of a structure; by damage or destruction of the transport networks servicing the structure; or by insecurity, for example. Affected populationNumber and percentagen/an/aType of basic infrastructure, e.g. police stations, town halls, administrative buildings, schools (if not covered by Edu), playgrounds, parks, By age/gender/other diversity issues such as mobility. These different grounds have to have access to services such a women friendly police stations, girls friendly schools, or those that have mobility access routes.YesBaseline, OutputYesn/aPhase 1: Identify and assess the type and the extent of damages of the basic community infrastructure and their distribution in the affected communities. The sources of information are likely to be different for each type of basic community infrastructure and it is also important to determine the number of population served in the community by an affected basic infrastructure of each type. Determine the number or persons affected by the crisis ? refer to the common parameter (common dataset) adopted by the Humanitarian Country Team. Analyse the impacts in the lives and livelihoods of community population and determine the numbers and types of basic community infrastructure for which repair and reconstruction are critically important for livelihood recovery of the community population. Assess spontaneous responses of the affected communities and identify if emergency response actions include a component of restoration of basic community infrastructure. Phase 2: Verify the information about the types and number of basic infrastructure to improve the data disaggregation. Determine the number of population having access to basic infrastructure; Phase 3: Verify and update the numbers and types of basic community infrastructure based on the available report of comprehensive joint assessment such as PDNA. Improve the precision by documenting population's access to different types of basic infrastructure; Phase 4: Conduct in depth analysis of the basic community infrastructurePhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Standards and local customs to be defined according to context. Basic community infrastructure are small scale, low cost, and community self-constructed basic infrastructure, technical facilities and systems to ensure basic services and thus are critical for sustenance of lives and livelihood of the population. Access refers to populations ability to make use of or take advantage of basic infrastructure. Types of basic community infrastructure are locally determined, usually include but not limited to community access roads, small drainage and water structures, socio-economic infrastructures, communication and early warning, community non-conventional energy plants, and community small and micro enterprises. Recovery of basic community infrastructure should be guided by the participation and insights of the affected communities. The process should use labour-intensive technologies particular attention should be given to ensure that future disaster risks and minimised during recovery. The extent of damage may suitably be categorized as minor damage, partial damage and complete damage with the understanding that minor damage can be repaired with little efforts by the community themselves. In the absence of a country-wide established method, cross-sectoral and community consultation will be needed to draw a balanced perspective in devising a method of estimation for people's access with data disaggregated for each type of basic community infrastructure.Secondary data from National Statistical offices, special reports, report on community resources and risk mapping from local institutions, NGOs and Community Based Organisations. Statistical techniques may require to be applied for necessary extrapolation in preparing the baseline data.n/aCommunity/ LGU surveyE1 Access and Learning Environment, F3 Food Access, F5 Market Access, F7 Utilization, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P6 Displacement and Return, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage
Early RecoveryR-16R1 Economic Recovery and LivelihoodsNumber and Percentage of affected population with no access to any formal or informal financial serviceThis indicator must first assess the  type of financial services that were available to a population pre-crisis. These can include, for example, banks, phones,  family or community borrowing and trade. Affected populationNumber and percentage# people in population# of affected population with no access to any formal or informal financial serviceGeography, sex and ageYesBaseline, OutcomeYesn/an/aIn order to do no harm - attempt should be made to understand the context, its players, existing capacities and resources and to build on these rather than creating new systems. When reaching out to non state actors - ensure understanding, acceptance and agreement with the community.n/an/aHousehold surveyF1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance
Early RecoveryR-17R3 Capacity BuildingNumber and percentage of micro enterprise owners in affected areas recieved skills trainingMicro enterprise owners can be identified as people who own, operate and staff their own small and very small businesses.  If these enterprises are affected by disaster, the owners may benefit from skilling up in related or new trades Enterprise ownersNumber and percentageSexYesBaseline, OutputYesN/AN/APhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Trainees should be both men and women, and the training offered must be useful, relevant and enabling.Number of small and micro-enterprises registered at a local levelN/ALGU surveyF1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance
Early RecoveryR-18R3 Capacity BuildingNumber and percentage of CBO leaders in affected areas trained in disaster risk reduction and planningCommunity based organisation leaders can be defined as people who initiate adn manage community groups that benefit people in the community or neighbourhood. If these CBOs are either affected by disaster, or are contributing to humnaitarian response, then the leaders may benefit from skilling up. CBO leadersNumber and percentageSexYesBaseline, OutputYesN/AN/APhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Trainees should be both men and women, and the training offered must be useful, relevent and enabling.N/ACommunity/ LGU surveyF1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance
Early RecoveryR-2R4 GovernanceNumber and Percentage of affected areas with local government-led response planning capacity, with the ability to meet the needs of the enitre community in its diversity "Area"  refers to a government unit at the lowest level - usually a municipality/ town/ city. However, areas can be defined according to context. "Response Plan" is defined as the presence of a plan at local level, that indicates the relative readiness and capacity of the locality to undertake response and recovery activities. Affected areasAffected areas (Areas to be defined at the national level - whether regional, district or local level)# of affected areas# of affected areas with local government-led response planning capacityn/aYesOutputYesn/aPhase 1: Determine the lowest governance / administrative unit and the form of disaster/crisis related planning, e.g. preparedness or contingency planning, emergency response, or recovery plan. Count the number of localities that have completed their recovery plans; Phase 2: Count the number of locality that have completed their recovery plans; Phase 3: Count the number of locality that have completed their recovery plans; Phase 4: Count the number of locality that have completed their recovery plans.Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Recovery planning at this level usually has budgetary implications. This should not be confused with community level planning.Number of localities with either crisis/disaster preparedness and/or contingency plan that have recovery component in it.The earlier the locality has a recovery plan, the higher the chance for recovery success.Community/ LGU surveyC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, F3 Food Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage
Early RecoveryR-3R4 GovernanceNumber of affected areas with local government taking active planning/strategic measure to reduce the risk of disasters"Government-led" refers to a process that is either sanctioned, endorsed, or directly led by the government (including local government units) to have an effect on specific sectors. This indicator may include DRR, preparedness or contingency planning and practice. Affected areasNumber and Percentage: Affected areas (Areas to be defined at the national level - whether regional, district or local level)# of affected areas# of affeced areas with local government led DRR initiativesn/aYesOutputYesn/aThis indicator should be monitored together with other cluster/sector indicators on DRR as the DRR initiatives taken by local government may well support building disaster risk reduction capacity at sectorial level. This activity should take into account the variety of strengths and weakness of different parts of the community to ensure the plans are efficient and offer assistance to everyone.Recovery planning at this level usually has budgetary implications. This should not be confused with community level planning.n/an/aCommunity/ LGU surveyC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, F3 Food Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage
Early RecoveryR-4R4 GovernanceNumber of areas where local government across sectors use knowledge, innovation and education to build a culture of preparedness, safety and resilience. This is to be differentiated by age/sexThis could include relevant information on disasters is available and accessible at all levels, to all stakeholders (through networks, development of information sharing system. ii. School curricula, education material and relevant trainings include risk reduction and recovery concepts and practices. iii. Research methods and tools for multi risk assessments and cost benefit analysis are developed and strengthened. iv. Country wide public awareness strategy exists to stimulate a culture of disaster resilience, with outreach to urban and rural communities. Affected areasNumber and Percentage# of affected areas# of affected areas with local government-led intersectoral resilience building initiativesChildren, adults, elderly, vulnerableYesOutputYesn/aThis indicator should be monitored together with other cluster/sector indicators on DRR, where local knowledge, innovation and education has been used build resilience across sectors and building disaster risk reduction capacity at sectoral level. This activity should take into account the variety of strengths and weakness of different parts of the community to ensure the plans are efficient and offer assistance to everyone.Livelihood assets are (human, capital, natural, physical, social, or financial) resource base of the household that when combined with capabilities and activities will generate means of living, and if sustainable, generate the well being of a household. Livelihood assets are to be determined locally. e.g. Fishing boats for coastal community, land and agricultural implements in the hinterlands, education, skills and capitals in urban area, house, car, household utilities, land, physical infrastructure, social networks, associations, etc.n/an/aCommunity/ LGU surveyC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.1 Displacement Site Managers, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, F3 Food Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage
Early RecoveryR-5R1 Economic Recovery and LivelihoodsNumber and Percentage of households in need of income supportHouseholds that are commonly in need of income support include those with no or very low income sources, female- or child- headed households and internally displaced people. HouseholdsPercentage# of Households in affected area# of Households in affected area in need of income supportSex (male-/female-headed household), and ageYesBaselineYesn/an/an/an/an/aHousehold surveyC2 Population information management, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, F4 Income Access, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance
Early RecoveryR-6R1 Economic Recovery and LivelihoodsNumber and Percentage of households with no income sources provided with income support (transfer or generation)After an emergency, the livelihoods of a household may be suspended or destroyed. The kinds of households affected, and the kinds of support they need, will be different in different contexts. HouseholdsNumber and Percentagen/an/aSex (male-/female-headed household), and ageYesOutputYesn/aPhase 1: Establish the estimated number and characteristics of households whose income is affected by the crisis to establish the scale of impact on livelihood Identify emergency responses (e.g.. cash/food for work, emergency response-related employment, grants scheme, livelihoods start-up packs/kits etc.) that has income transfer and / or income generation scheme and estimate the coverage; Phase 2: Update the estimated number and characteristics of households whose income is affected by the crisis to establish the scale of impact on livelihood. Update the emergency responses that have cash transfer and / or income generation scheme and estimate the coverage. Identify responses that can evolve into sustainable income and employment and share information with development actors to ensure linkage to long term recovery; Phase 3: Verify the estimations with formal records ? when necessary triangulate with field data and third party analysis; Phase 4: Conduct in depth sectoral analysis.Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Disaster/conflict affect peoples access to income and sustainable employment. This should take into account the varying needs, skills and social norms to ensure equitable access. Distinction has to be made between having no income even before the crisis and losing income due to the impact of crisis. This indicator focuses on the former.Pre-crisis census, other official reports, or media quoted household income types and levels. Determine rapidly the crisis? impacts on livelihood, to the extent possible specified by sectors/type of employment, geographical area, and population segment based on damage assessment report, economic/social welfare authorities, and / or other analysis such as livelihoods assessments (See ILO/FAO Guide on Livelihoods Assessments, 2008), Household Economy Analysis, or Household profiling. Incorporate basic conflict/disaster risk analysis as part of the overall assessments on livelihoods.n/aCluster members- programme monitoringC2 Population information management, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, F2.1 Cash Transfer, F2.2 Voucher Transfer, F2.3 In-kind Transfer, F4 Income Access, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance
Early RecoveryR-7R1 Economic Recovery and LivelihoodsNumber and Percentage of households with no livelihood assetsAfter an emergency, the livelihood assets of a household may be damaged, destroyed or killed (in the case of livestock). The kinds of assets affected, and the kinds of support the affected households need, will be different in different contexts. HouseholdsNumber and Percentage# of crisis affected households# of crisis affected households with no livelihood assetsSex (male-/female-headed household), and ageYesBaseline, OutputYesn/aPhase 1: Determine which livelihood sectors and estimate the number of households affected by the crisis. Establish up to five most critical livelihood assets associated with the livelihood sectors affected by the crisis. Determine if there are livelihood assets component in any emergency response measures and estimate the number of households that benefitted in terms of receiving livelihood assets from such measures. Livelihoods assessment that include wealth ranking can be done periodically to monitor replacement and replenishment of assets through emergency response. Incorporate a basic disaster/conflict risk analysis as part of the livelihoods assessments; Phase 2: Update the estimated number and characteristics of households whose income is affected by the crisis to establish the scale of impact on livelihood. Update the emergency responses that has income transfer and / or income generation scheme and estimate the coverage. Determine that interventions are conflict and disaster risk sensitive. Determine households and individuals already engaged in self employment and wage employment due to crisis response. Document set of assets acquired due to crisis response activities. Compile the information on income earning opportunities, and assets replacement/replenishment levels, and share this with recovery and development actors, where possible; Phase 3: verify the estimations with formal records, when necessary triangulate with field data and third party analysis. Share information with other stakeholders to enable the link between early and long term recovery; Phase 4: Conduct in depth sectoral analysisPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Livelihood assets are (human, capital, natural, physical, social, or financial) resource base of the household that when combined with capabilities and activities will generate means of living, and if sustainable, generate the well being of a household. Livelihood assets are to be determined locally. e.g. Fishing boats for coastal community, land and agricultural implements in the hinterlands, education, skills and capitals in urban area, house, car, household utilities, land, physical infrastructure, social networks, associations, etc.Pre-crisis census on types of livelihood to the extent possible at household level. Official pre-crisis reports describing economic assets of the crisis-affected areas. Livelihoods assessment that include wealth ranking in pre-crisis situations; Ensure assessments incorporate basic disaster risk/conflict analysis to ensure crisis sensitivity.This will be specified in the guidance per phase: e.g. household goods, income, shelter/housing, domestic animals, etc.Household surveyC2 Population information management, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, F2.1 Cash Transfer, F2.2 Voucher Transfer, F2.3 In-kind Transfer, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance
Early RecoveryR-8R1 Economic Recovery and LivelihoodsPercentage of economically active workforce that is employed on: a) a short term/ temporary basis; and b) a long term/ permanent basis"Employment" is defined broadly here as work that is paid, either formally or informally. It can allow households to be self sufficient and further, can allow them to build their resilience in the face of disasters. Long term work increases these positives. Affected populationNumber and Percentage(Total workforce) # of people in economically active workforce(Employed workers) # of people in economically active workforce that is employed on: a) a short term/ temporary basis; and b) a long term/ permanent basis. Consider the influence of the unofficial sector, such as street selling of goods. Sex, AgeYesBaseline, OutcomeYesn/aPhase 1: Update the estimated number and characteristics of persons whose employment is affected by the crisis to establish the scale of impact. Update the emergency responses and other measures that has employment generation and estimate the coverage. Undertake rough and quick hazard mapping and conflict analysis and ensure that short and long term employment are crisis sensitive; Phase 3: Verify the estimations with formal records when necessary triangulate with field data and third party analysis. Document information and share with recovery and development partners to ensure sustainable recovery support; Phase 4: Conduct in depth sectoral analysisPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Employment is work or occupational activities to which one is used or being paid wage/salary. Short term refers to gainful engagement between 1 to12 months?; long term is an engagement with tenure more than one year. Engagement that is less than 1 month, in this case, shouldn't be considered as employment. Eligible workforce refers to the number of people of working age and below retirement age who are expected to be actively in the gainful work activities or are actively seeking employment.Census or other formal records on percentage of employment, usually at the labour statistics, statistics office, or at the general administration office, to the extent possible disaggregated by type/sector and gender. Determine impact of the crisis on employment differentiated by types/sectors. Determine possible sectors that might require labour intensive work through e.g. cash for work. Determine level of demand for goods and services; Document month by moth inflation.n/an/aC2 Population information management, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, F4 Income Access, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance
Early RecoveryR-9R2 Basic Infrastructure RestorationNumber and Percentage of population directly affected by problematic rubble/debris"Debris or rubble" is the material from the damage or destruction that results from some disasters. It includes wreckage from everything that could possibly be destroyed or damaged, as well as materials brought in by a catastrophic event. "Problematic" refers to situations where such debris causes immediate physical and psychological barriers for emergency relief and recovery activities. Affected populationNumber and Percentage# of crisis-hit people# of crisis-hit people directly affected by rubble/ debrisGeography, sex and ageYesBaseline, Outcome, OutputYesn/aTaking gender/age and other diversity issues into account will allow for the prioritization of clearance based on needs of the most vulnerable. Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4The guidance per phase will specify alternatively roads, services, etc.: Depending on the situation and phase, the following might be taking into account: number of people affected by debris (example : 1 million people/60% of the population of a city affected by debris)n/an/aHousehold surveyC4 Camp planning and durable solutions, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H6 Environmental Health, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance