Global ClustersCodeSub-domainTitleDescriptionUnit of MeasurementUnit DescriptionDenominatorNumeratorDisaggregationKey indicatorTypesResponse MonitoringStandardsThresholdGuidance on phasesPhase applicabilityGeneral guidanceGuidance for pre-crisis/baselineCommentsData SourcesSector cross-tagging
Food Security;Health;Logistics;Protection;Nutrition;Water Sanitation Hygiene;Camp Coordination / Management;Education;Emergency Shelter and NFI;Emergency Telecommunications;Early RecoveryAAP-1Feedback MechanismsNumber of feedback received (including complaints) which have been acted uponFeedback mechanisms provide a means for all those affected to comment on and thus indirectly influence programme planning and implementation (see HAP’s ‘participation’ benchmark). They include focus group discussions, surveys, interviews and meetings on ‘lessons learnt’ with a representative sample of all the affected population (see ECB’s Good Enough Guide for tools and Guidance notes 3–4). The findings and the agency’s actions in response to feedback should be systematically shared with the affected population.InstitutionNumberN/ANumber of organisations with formal feedback mechanisms in placeYesProcessYesHAP Benchmark 3 on Sharing information, Sphere Core Standard 1: People-centered humanitarian response, The Good Enough Guide - Section 5: Use feedback to improve project impactAll PhasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Feedback mechanisms can take many forms. Whatever the most appropriate channels are should be used; radio talk back programmes, online surveys, sms and twitter inputs, regularised focus group discussions with selected members of the population, suggestions and complaints boxes, designation of sector or camp committees to feedback on specific topics, prioritisation assessments, through dedicated community engagement staff among many other possibilities. Sex, age, ability or other relevant diversity disaggregation of the feedback received is important in order to understand who is most at risk and to take responsible actions. It is important to remember that feedback needs to be collected, digested and acted upon, and then the results of those actions relayed to the population, then another round of feedback can begin on the changed situation. This is the 'feedback loop' - an ongoing dialogue between the humanitarian community and the affected population. Remember that much of this is already happening - through food monitors, community outreach programmes, ongoing assessments - the important thing is to keep the feedback loop continuing.• Clusters and partners have a formal, appropriate feedback mechanism in place that is discussed and agreed with key stakeholders and publicly communicated. • The feedback mechanism employed is appropriate and robust enough to deal with (communicate, receive, process, respond to and learn from) complaints. • Clusters and Lead Agencies/Advisory Groups (SAG) have oversight of feedback (incl. complaints) mechanism and learn from and react to information received. Agencies, NGOs, Government, Media, etc(C) Camp Coordination / Management, C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C1.1 Displacement Site Managers, C1.2 CCCM Mechanisms, C2 Population information management, C2.1 CCCM Mechanisms, C2.2 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, C2.3 Service Provision, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.1 Displacement Site Managers, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C3.4 Service Provision - Protection, C3.5 Service Provision - Food and Nutrition, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, C3.7 Protection, C3.8 Access and Movement, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, C3.10 Service Provision - Health, C3.11 Service Provision - Shelter, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, C4.1 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, (E) Education, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E1.1 Equal Access, E1.2 Facilities and services, E1.3 Protection and Well-being, E2 Teaching and Learning, E2.1 Curricula, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, E3.1 Law and Policy Formulation, E3.2 Recruitment and Selection, E3.3 Supervision, E4 Educational Policy, E4.1 Law and Policy Formulation, (F) Food Security, F1 Food Assistance, F1.1 Cash Transfer, F1.2 Voucher Transfer, F1.3 In-kind Transfer, F1.4 Livelihood Recovery, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F2.1 Cash Transfer, F2.2 Voucher Transfer, F2.3 In-kind Transfer, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F6.1 Food Availability and Agriculture, F6.2 Livestock, F7 Utilization, F8 Agriculture and Livestock, (H) Health, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H3 Communicable diseases, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H4.1 STI & HIV, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H4.3 Sexual violence, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, H6 Environmental Health, (L) Logistics, L1 Volume, L2 Weight, (N) Nutrition, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N1.1 SAM, N1.2 MAM, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, (P) Protection, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children, PC8 Justice for Children, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG2 Develop/apply SOPs context specific, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PG4 Advocacy, awareness, education with affected populations, local authorities, international community, PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, PG6 Prevention Programming, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, PL1 HLP Documentation, PL2 Access to Land, PL3 HLP Disputes, PL4 Security of tenure for informal rights holders or vulnerable groups, P4 (PM) Mine Action, PM1 Clearance of Mines and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW), PM2 Mine and ERW risk education, PM3 Stockpile destruction, PM4 Victim Assistance, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, S1 Shelter, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, (T) Emergency Telecommunications, T1 ICT Performance, T2 ETC Coordination, (W) Water Sanitation Hygiene, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W2 Water Supply, W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality, W2.3 Water Facilities, W3 Excreta Disposal, W3.1 Environment, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation
Food Security;Health;Logistics;Protection;Nutrition;Water Sanitation Hygiene;Camp Coordination / Management;Education;Emergency Shelter and NFI;Emergency Telecommunications;Early RecoveryAAP-2Sharing InformationNumber of information products distributed to the affected population through a variety of mechanisms on humanitarian program planning, functioning and progressPeople have a right to accurate and updated information about actions taken on their behalf. Information can reduce anxiety and is an essential foundation of community responsibility and ownership. At a minimum, clusters and agencies should provide a description of the cluster's role and responsibilities, agency’s mandate and project(s), the population’s entitlements and rights, and when and where to access assistance (see HAP’s ‘sharing information’ benchmark). (Sphere Core Standard 1, Guidance Note 4) Possible examples:CommunityNumberN/A# of information messages deliveredYesProcessYesHAP Benchmark 3 on Sharing information, Sphere Core Standard 1: People-centered humanitarian responseAll PhasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Common ways of sharing information include noticeboards, public meetings, schools, newspapers, SMS 'blasts', FAQ flyers or radio and TV broadcasts. The information should demonstrate considered understanding of people’s situations and be conveyed in local language(s), using a variety of adapted media so that it is accessible to all those concerned. For example, use spoken communications or pictures for children and adults who cannot read, use uncomplicated language (i.e. understandable to local 12-year-old) and employ a large typeface when printing information for people with visual impairments. Manage meetings so that older people or those with hearing difficulties can hear. Sex, age, ability or other relevant diversity must be considered when preparing information products as is important in order to understand who is able to access information.• Information about an organisation’s or cluster’s mission, values, legal status and contact details. • Information about projects, plans and activities (in particular beneficiary selection criteria and relevant financial information). • Regular reports of actual performance in relation to previously agreed goals. • Specific details for making comments, suggestions or complaints about the cluster or agency’s activities (preferably a named member of staff). Agencies, NGOs, Government(C) Camp Coordination / Management, C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C1.1 Displacement Site Managers, C1.2 CCCM Mechanisms, C2 Population information management, C2.1 CCCM Mechanisms, C2.2 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, C2.3 Service Provision, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.1 Displacement Site Managers, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C3.4 Service Provision - Protection, C3.5 Service Provision - Food and Nutrition, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, C3.7 Protection, C3.8 Access and Movement, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, C3.10 Service Provision - Health, C3.11 Service Provision - Shelter, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, C4.1 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, (E) Education, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E1.1 Equal Access, E1.2 Facilities and services, E1.3 Protection and Well-being, E2 Teaching and Learning, E2.1 Curricula, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, E3.1 Law and Policy Formulation, E3.2 Recruitment and Selection, E3.3 Supervision, E4 Educational Policy, E4.1 Law and Policy Formulation, (F) Food Security, F1 Food Assistance, F1.1 Cash Transfer, F1.2 Voucher Transfer, F1.3 In-kind Transfer, F1.4 Livelihood Recovery, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F2.1 Cash Transfer, F2.2 Voucher Transfer, F2.3 In-kind Transfer, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F6.1 Food Availability and Agriculture, F6.2 Livestock, F7 Utilization, F8 Agriculture and Livestock, (H) Health, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H3 Communicable diseases, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H4.1 STI & HIV, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H4.3 Sexual violence, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, H6 Environmental Health, (L) Logistics, L1 Volume, L2 Weight, (N) Nutrition, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N1.1 SAM, N1.2 MAM, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, (P) Protection, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children, PC8 Justice for Children, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG2 Develop/apply SOPs context specific, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PG4 Advocacy, awareness, education with affected populations, local authorities, international community, PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, PG6 Prevention Programming, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, PL1 HLP Documentation, PL2 Access to Land, PL3 HLP Disputes, PL4 Security of tenure for informal rights holders or vulnerable groups, P4 (PM) Mine Action, PM1 Clearance of Mines and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW), PM2 Mine and ERW risk education, PM3 Stockpile destruction, PM4 Victim Assistance, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, S1 Shelter, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, (T) Emergency Telecommunications, T1 ICT Performance, T2 ETC Coordination, (W) Water Sanitation Hygiene, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W2 Water Supply, W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality, W2.3 Water Facilities, W3 Excreta Disposal, W3.1 Environment, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation
Food Security;Health;Logistics;Protection;Nutrition;Water Sanitation Hygiene;Camp Coordination / Management;Education;Emergency Shelter and NFI;Emergency Telecommunications;Early RecoveryAAP-3ParticipationNumber of persons consulted (disaggregated by sex/age) before designing a program/project [alternatively: while implementing the program/project] Participation in design of assessments, programmes, evaluations etc, means that a selected segment(s) of the affected populaiton have a direct influence on decision making.  Measures should be taken to ensure the participation of members of all groups of affected people – young and old, men and women. Special efforts should be made to include people who are not well represented, are marginalised (e.g. by ethnicity or religion) or otherwise ‘invisible’ (e.g. housebound or in an institution).InstitutionNumberN/Anumber of persons consultedYesProcessYesHAP Benchmark 4 on Participation, Sphere Core Standard 1: People-centered humanitarian response, The Good Enough Guide - Tool 3: How to involve people throughout the projectAll PhasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Understanding and addressing the barriers to participation faced by different people is critical to balanced participation. How a cluster or organisation enables key stakeholders to play an active role in the decision-making processes that affect them. It is unrealistic to expect an organisation to engage with all stakeholders over all decisions all of the time. Therefore the organisation must have clear guidelines (and practices) enabling it to prioritize stakeholders appropriately and to be responsive to the differences in power between them. Mechanisms need to be in place to ensure that the most marginalized and affected are represented and have influence. Participation here also encompasses the processes through which an organisation or cluster monitors and reviews its progress and results against goals and objectives; feeds learning back into the organisation on an on-going basis; and reports on the results of the process. To increase accountability to stakeholders, goals and objectives must be also designed in consultation with those stakeholders. A well known example of participation in developing indicators is the WASH indicator developed by a community which was - "# of hours girls spend in school" - highlighting the importance of education to the community, and also that improved water access had improved education possibilities. So the indicator has a measurement of impact built into it, the improved water access as an outcome can be assumed.• Organisations document how it speaks with a balanced cross-section of representatives from the affected communities. • Agency has a verifiable record of how communities (or their representatives) are demonstrably involved and influential in decision-making, implementation and judgement of impact throughout the lifetime of a project. • Agency has mechanisms in place to monitor and evaluate outcomes and impact and these are reported against (incl. to affected communities). • Cluster has a verifiable record of how it identified interest groups in the affected communities, and the power relationships that exist. Agencies, NGOs, Government(C) Camp Coordination / Management, C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C1.1 Displacement Site Managers, C1.2 CCCM Mechanisms, C2 Population information management, C2.1 CCCM Mechanisms, C2.2 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, C2.3 Service Provision, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.1 Displacement Site Managers, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C3.4 Service Provision - Protection, C3.5 Service Provision - Food and Nutrition, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, C3.7 Protection, C3.8 Access and Movement, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, C3.10 Service Provision - Health, C3.11 Service Provision - Shelter, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, C4.1 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, (E) Education, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E1.1 Equal Access, E1.2 Facilities and services, E1.3 Protection and Well-being, E2 Teaching and Learning, E2.1 Curricula, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, E3.1 Law and Policy Formulation, E3.2 Recruitment and Selection, E3.3 Supervision, E4 Educational Policy, E4.1 Law and Policy Formulation, (F) Food Security, F1 Food Assistance, F1.1 Cash Transfer, F1.2 Voucher Transfer, F1.3 In-kind Transfer, F1.4 Livelihood Recovery, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F2.1 Cash Transfer, F2.2 Voucher Transfer, F2.3 In-kind Transfer, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F6.1 Food Availability and Agriculture, F6.2 Livestock, F7 Utilization, F8 Agriculture and Livestock, (H) Health, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H3 Communicable diseases, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H4.1 STI & HIV, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H4.3 Sexual violence, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, H6 Environmental Health, (L) Logistics, L1 Volume, L2 Weight, (N) Nutrition, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N1.1 SAM, N1.2 MAM, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, (P) Protection, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children, PC8 Justice for Children, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG2 Develop/apply SOPs context specific, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PG4 Advocacy, awareness, education with affected populations, local authorities, international community, PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, PG6 Prevention Programming, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, PL1 HLP Documentation, PL2 Access to Land, PL3 HLP Disputes, PL4 Security of tenure for informal rights holders or vulnerable groups, P4 (PM) Mine Action, PM1 Clearance of Mines and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW), PM2 Mine and ERW risk education, PM3 Stockpile destruction, PM4 Victim Assistance, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, S1 Shelter, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, (T) Emergency Telecommunications, T1 ICT Performance, T2 ETC Coordination, (W) Water Sanitation Hygiene, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W2 Water Supply, W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality, W2.3 Water Facilities, W3 Excreta Disposal, W3.1 Environment, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation
NutritionN-001N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionGlobal acute malnutrition (GAM) Prevalence rate (%) of global acute malnutrition in children 6 to 59 months of age based on presence of bilateral pitting oedema and / or weight-for-height z-score less than -2 standard deviations of the median of the standard population (WHO 2006) IndividualPercentage Total number of children aged 6-59 months surveyedNumber of children aged 6-59 months that meet the criteria for global acute malnutritionGeographical area, age, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Appendix 4: Measuring acute malnutrition, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chapterWHO TRS 854. Severity classification: 5,10, 15%preparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsNote that WFH and MUAC do not measure the same things and are not comparable. Data on the global malnutrition rate should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific discrimination girls or boys might face in accessing nutrition. In case there is an important difference between the percentage of girls and the percentage of boys suffering from malnutrition, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing in equally accessing nutrition, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs that might differently impact on girls' and boys' nutritional well being.Population-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-002N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionAcute malnutrition in infants less than 6 monthsPrevalence rate (%) of global acute malnutrition in infants less than 6 months of age based on presence of bilateral pitting oedema and /or weight-for-height z-score less than -2 standard deviations of the median of the standard population (WHO 2006) IndividualPercentage Total number of children less than 6 months surveyedNumber of infants 0-5 months that meet the criteria for global acute malnutritionGeographical area, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Food security and nutrition chapter, Appendix 4: Measuring acute malnutritionWHO TRS 854. Severity classification: 5,10, 15%preparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsNote that WFH and MUAC do not measure the same things and are not comparable. Data on the acute malnutrition rate should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific discrimination baby girls or baby boys might face in accessing nutrition. In case there is an important difference between the percentage of infant girls and the percentage of infant boys suffering from malnutrition, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs on breastfeeding that might differently impact on baby girls' and baby boys' nutritional well being.Population-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-003N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSevere acute malnutrition (SAM)Prevalence rate (%) of severe acute malnutrition in children 6 to 59 months of age based on presence of bilateral pitting oedema and / or weight-for-height z-score less than -3 standard deviations of the median of the standard population (WHO 2006) IndividualPercentage Total number of children aged 6-59 months surveyedNumber of children aged 6-59 months that meet the criteria for severe acute malnutritionGeographical area, age, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Appendix 4: Measuring acute malnutrition, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chapter, Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutritionNo standard WHO thresholds; this indicator cut-off should be interpreted in consideration of other indicators including morbidity, mortality and proportion of GAM; Reference: WHO child growth standards and the identification of severe acute malnutrition in infants and children. A Joint Statement by the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund, 2009. preparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsNote that WFH and MUAC do not measure the same things and are not comparable. Data on the severe acute malnutrition rate should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific discrimination girls or boys might face in accessing nutrition. In case there is an important difference between the percentage of girls and the percentage of boys suffering from malnutrition, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing in equally accessing nutrition, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs that might differently impact on girls' and boys' nutritional well being.Population-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-004N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSevere acute malnutrition (SAM) in infants 0-5 monthsPrevalence rate (%) of severe acute malnutrition in infants less than 6 months of age based on presence of bilateral pitting oedema and weight-for-height z-score less than -3 standard deviations of the median of the standard population (WHO 2006) IndividualPercentage Total number of children 0-5 months surveyedNumber of infants 0-5 months that meet the criteria for severe acute malnutritionGeographical area, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Appendix 4: Measuring acute malnutrition, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chapterNo standard WHO thresholds; this indicator cut-off should be interpreted in consideration of other indicators including morbidity, mortality and proportion of GAM; Reference: WHO child growth standards and the identification of severe acute malnutrition in infants and children. A Joint Statement by the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund, 2009. preparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsNote that WFH and MUAC do not measure the same things and are not comparable. Data on the severe acute malnutrition rate should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific discrimination baby girls or baby boys might face in accessing nutrition. In case there is an important difference between the percentage of infant girls and the percentage of infant boys suffering from malnutrition, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs on breastfeeding that might differently impact on baby girls' and baby boys' nutritional well being.Population-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-005N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionModerate acute malnutrition (MAM)Prevalence rate (%) of moderate acute malnutrition in children 6 to 59 months of age based on presence of weight-for-height z-score less than -2 and equal or greater than -3 standard deviations of the median of the standard population (WHO 2006) IndividualPercentage Total number of children aged 6-59 months surveyedNumber of children aged 6-59 months that meet the criteria for moderate acute malnutritionGeographical area, age, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Appendix 4: Measuring acute malnutrition, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chapter, Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micro-nutrient deficiencies standard 1: Moderate acute malnutritionNo standard WHO thresholds; this indicator cut-off should be interpreted in consideration of other indicators including morbidity, mortality and proportion of GAMpreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsPrevalence easy to derive by subtracting SAM from GAMNote that WFH and MUAC do not measure the same things and are not comparable. Data on the moderate acute malnutrition rate should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific discrimination girls or boys might face in accessing nutrition. In case there is an important difference between the percentage of girls and the percentage of boys suffering from malnutrition, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing in equally accessing nutrition, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs that might differently impact on girls' and boys' nutritional well being.Population-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-006N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionModerate acute malnutrition (MAM) in infants 0-5 monthsPrevalence rate (%) of moderate acute malnutrition in infants less than 6 months of age based on weight-for-height z-score less than -2 and equal or greater than -3 standard deviations of the median of the standard population (WHO 2006) IndividualPercentage Total number of children less than 6 months surveyedNumber of infants less than 6 months that meet the criteria for moderate acute malnutritionGeographical area, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesNo standard WHO thresholds; this indicator cut-off should be interpreted in consideration of other indicators including morbidity, mortality and proportion of GAMpreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsPrevalence easy to derive by subtracting Proportion of SAM from Proportion of GAMNote that WFH and MUAC do not measure the same things and are not comparable. Data on the moderate acute malnutrition rate should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific discrimination baby girls or baby boys might face in accessing nutrition. In case there is an important difference between the percentage of infant girls and the percentage of infant boys suffering from malnutrition, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs on breastfeeding that might differently impact on baby girls' and baby boys' nutritional well being.Population-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-007N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionChildhood stuntingPrevalence rate (%) of stunting in children 0 to 59 months of age based on height-for-age z-score less than -2 standard deviations of the median of the standard population (WHO 2006) IndividualPercentage Total number of children 0 to 59 months of age surveyedNumber of children 0 to 59 months of age that meet the criteria for stuntingGeographical area, age, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesWHO TRS 854. Severity classification: 20,30,40 %preparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsAim should be to assess stunting in the entire age group 0-59 monthsDisaggregation by sex and age group should be aimed for and results should be analysed. Note: if surveys being undertaken include 0-59 then use this age group - if not - and the survey is including 6-59 then we may use 6-59. Ideally the Proportion of should be adjusted for 0-59 months)Population-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W4 Vector Control, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-008N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionAcute malnutrition based on MUAC and oedemaPrevalence rate (%) of children 6-59 months with MUAC less than 125 mm and/or having bilateral pitting oedema IndividualPercentage Total number of children aged 6-59 months surveyedNumber of children aged 6-59 months that meet the criteria for wasting based on MUACGeographical area, age, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesWHO child growth standards and the identification of severe acute malnutrition in infants and children. A Joint Statement by the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund, 2009. Phase I,II; added to surveys Phase III,IV Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4When possible to use representative surveys, alternatively - rapid nutrition assessment with smaller number of children can give an idea of the situation - but these findings from a rapid nutrition assessment - with small numbers of children need to be treated with caution and should NOT be presented as prevalence but as number of children It is a good practice to disaggregate oedema cases, however there is a concern of accuracy and precisionPopulation surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART) & rapid nutrition assessment F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F5 Market Access, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W4 Vector Control, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-009N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSevere acute malnutrition based on MUAC and oedemaPrevalence rate (%) children 6-59 months with MUAC less than 115 mm and/or having bilateral pitting oedema IndividualPercentage Total number of children aged 6-59 months surveyedNumber of children aged 6-59 months that meet the criteria for severe wasting based on MUACGeographical area, age, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesWHO child growth standards and the identification of severe acute malnutrition in infants and children. A Joint Statement by the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund, 2009. Phase I,II; added to surveys Phase III,IVPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4When possible to use representative surveys, alternatively - rapid nutrition assessment with smaller number of children can give an idea of the situation - but these findings from a rapid nutrition assessment - with small numbers of children need to be treated with caution and should NOT be presented as prevalence but as number of children It is a good practice to disaggregate oedema cases, however there is a concern of accuracy and precision.Population surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART) & rapid nutrition assessment F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F5 Market Access, F7 Utilization, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W4 Vector Control, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-010N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionModerate acute malnutrition based on MUACPrevalence rate (%) children 6-59 months with MUAC less than 125 mm but equal or more than 115 mm IndividualPercentage Total number of children aged 6-59 months surveyedNumber of children aged 6-59 months that meet the criteria for moderate wasting based on MUACGeographical area, age, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Appendix 4: Measuring acute malnutrition, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chapter, Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micro-nutrient deficiencies standard 1: Moderate acute malnutritionPhase I,II; added to surveys Phase III,IVPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4When possible to use representative survey, alternatively - rapid nutrition assessment with smaller number of children can give you a idea of the situation - but these findings from a rapid nutrition assessment - with small numbers of children need to be treated with caution and should NOT be presented as prevalence but as number of children Prevalence easy to derive by subtracting Proportion of severe wasting based on low MUAC from Proportion of wasting based on low MUACPopulation-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F5 Market Access, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W4 Vector Control, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-011N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionAcute malnutrition in Pregnant and Lactating WomenPrevalence rate (%) PLW with MUAC less than 210-230 mm (Note: Countries use a range of different cut-offs depending on resources) IndividualPercentage Total number of Pregnant and Lactating Women with infants below age of 0 to 5 months surveyedNumber of Pregnant and Lactating Women with infants 0-5 months that meet the criteria for acute malnutrition based on MUACGeographical areaYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Appendix 4: Measuring acute malnutrition, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chapterAll phases Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4There are NO agreed international Cut off points for MUAC for PLW so National MUAC cut off points may vary, If available/possible, use representative survey, if not - rapid nutrition assessment with smaller number of PLW can give you some idea of the situationPLW may be a problematic to define and identify, SMART surveys provide data for women with children, so definition of lactating should be mothers with infants 0-5 months; caution on excluding women in first pregnancyPopulation-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART) or rapid nutrition assessment F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W4 Vector Control, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-012N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionStunting in women of reproductive agePrevalence rate (%) of women 15-49 years old who have height less than 145 cm IndividualPercentage Total number of women 15-49 years surveyedNumber of women 15-49 years that meet the criteria for stuntingGeographical areaNoBaseline, OutcomeYespreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsPopulation-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W4 Vector Control, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-013N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionUndernutrition for adultsPrevalence rate (%) of adults aged 19.1 to 59.9 years old with BMI less than 17.00 kg/m2 and/or having bilateral pitting oedema IndividualPercentage Total number of adults aged 19.1 to 59.9 years old surveyedNumber of adults aged 19.1 to 59.9 years old that meet the criteria for undernutritionGeographical area, age, sexNoBaseline, OutcomeYesWHO TRS 854 classification: mild thinness (BMI = 17.00-18.49 kg/m2), moderate thinness (BMI = 16.00-16.99 kg/m2), and severe thinness (BMI < 16.00 kg/m2).Preparatory and phase IV and beyond Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsAnthropometric data should be interpreted with a contextual analysis of the associated nutritional risks for the population using underlying causes. In particular, data on the undernutrition rate should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific discrimination adult women or adult men might face in accessing nutrition. In case there is an important difference between the percentage of women and the percentage of men suffering from undernutrition, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs that might differently impact their nutritional well being.Population-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H3 Communicable diseases, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W4 Vector Control, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-014N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionUndernutrition for 5 to 19 year oldsPrevalence rate (%) of children and adolescents 5-19 years of age with Z-scores defined as BMI-for-age index less than -2 standard deviations from the median BMI of a reference population of children/adolescents of the same age and/or having bilateral pitting oedema IndividualPercentage Total number of children and adolescents 5-19 years surveyedNumber of children and adolescents 5-19 years that meet the criteria for undernutritionGeographical area, sexNoBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Appendix 4: Measuring acute malnutrition, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chapterWHO Reference 2007 www.who.int/growthref. Preparatory and phase iv and beyond Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsParticularly important for adolescent girls. Data on the undernutrition rate should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific discrimination girls, boys, adolescent girls and adolescent boys might face in accessing nutrition. In case there is an important difference between the percentage of girls and the percentage of boys suffering from undernutrition, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs that might differently impact on girls' and boys' nutritional well being. Note: the indicator includes 5.0 to 19.0 years. Based on WHO 2007 reference populationF1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H3 Communicable diseases, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W4 Vector Control, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-015N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionAcute malnutrition for older peoplePrevalence rate (%) of older people with a MUAC below 210mm or having bilateral pitting oedema IndividualPercentage Total number of older people surveyed Number of older people that meet the criteria for acute malnutritionGeographical area, sex: in preparatory, Phase III and IV, disaggregate by severity (<185mm and between 185 and 209mm)YesBaseline, OutcomeYesHelp Age guidelines 2013MUAC >210mm: no malnutrition; MAM: MUAC <210mm SAM: MUAC<185mm or oedema (Help Age guidelines 2013)In preparatory phase as well as phases I and II: use rapid assessment methods In phases III and IV, organize surveys with larger samples or use rapid assessment method, with multi-indicator questionnairePre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Rapid assessment methods can be used at any phase. The questionnaire should include questions about socio-economic status, health, household food security, water and sanitation.In preparatory phase,: Collect baseline demographic data about the percentage of people 50 and above (or 60 and above) disaggregated by sex and by age groups of 5 years (50-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70-74, 75-80, 80 and above) Assess household food security Organize focus group discussions with older people to have an idea of their access to food.older people are defined as "people aged 60 and above" (UN definition), but in some contexts (e.g. Somali, Ethiopia, Sudan etc.), can be 50 and above (as people are considered "old" from this age); Note: Nutritional oedema in older people may be difficult to distinguish from other types of oedema, so suggestion to separate BMI and oedema cases if necessary. Data on acute malnutrition rate should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific discrimination elderly women and elderly men might face in accessing nutrition. In case there is an important difference between the percentage of elderly women and the percentage of elderly men suffering from acute malnutrition, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs as well as on the social and family support networks available to them that might differ, hence impacting differently their nutritional well being.surveys: rapid assessmentsF1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H3 Communicable diseases, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W4 Vector Control, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-016N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionMinimum meal frequency for children 24-59 monthsProportion of children 24-59 months who are eating 3 meals a day or more IndividualPercentage Total number of children 24-59 months surveyedNumber of children 24-59 months who are eating 3 meals a day or moreGeographical area, age, sexNoBaselineNopreparatory; Phase I and II; Phase II and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Use 6-23 months age group indicator as proxy for 24-59 months, and assume older age group is worse off CAN be an important ALERT indicator in early phases of an emergency Indicator used for IYCF for 6-23 month age group based on WHO indicator. surveys; rapid assessments; F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-018N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesMinimum dietary diversity for children 24-59 months Proportion of children 24-59 months who receive foods from 4 or more food groups IndividualPercentage Total number of children 24-59 months surveyedNumber of children 24-59 months who receive from 4 or more of the following food groups.Geographical area, age, sexNoBaselineNoFood Security and Nutrition 4.1.1, Sphere: Food security - food transfers standard 1: General nutrition requirementsNo standard identified, only WHO source indicatorpreparatory; Phase I and II; Phase II and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 4Use 6-23 months age group indicator as proxy for 24-59 months, and assume older age group is worse off - CAN be an important ALERT indicator in early phases of an emergency (WHO uses a parameter of previous 24 hours). Food groups defined as follows: (1) grains, roots and tubers (2) legumes and nuts (3) dairy products (milk, yogurt, cheese) (4) flesh foods (meat, fish, poultry and liver/organ meats) (5) eggs (6) vitamin-A rich fruits and vegetables (7) other fruits and vegetablesIndicator used for IYCF for 6-23 month age group based on WHO indicatorsurveys; rapid assessments; F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-019N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesLevel of risk to common micronutrient deficiencies (high, medium, low)Qualitative assessment of nutritional risk of common micronutrient deficiencies (anaemia, iodine deficiency, vitamin A deficiency (night blindness), scurvy, beri beri, vitamin D deficiency) based on composite indicator analysis on prevalence rates, diet analysis, water quality and diarrheal disease, case finding Communityhigh, medium, lowN/AN/ABy deficiency; geographical area, sex, potentially vulnerable groups: PLW, children 6-59 months, other potentially vulnerable groupsYesBaselineNoSphere: Food security and nutrition, Appendix 5: Measures of the public health significance of micronutrient deficienciesSPHERE 2011, appendix 5 - thresholds (http://www.spherehandbook.org/en/appendix-15/)Preparatory; Phase II, III, IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4List prevalence rates for micronutrient status known for any vitamins and minerals and collect additional information on diet, water quality and disease, to assess the severity of the risk for specific population groupsuse survey data ; estimate from numbers of affected population by type of vulnerable groupsF1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, (R) Early Recovery, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-020N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesVitamin A coverage in children 6--59 monthsProportion of children 6 - 59 months having received vitamin A in previous 6 monthsIndividualPercentageTotal number of children 6-59 months surveyed Number of children 6 - 59 months that received vitamin A in the previous 6 months (mother's recall or card verified)Geographical area, age (6-11, 12-23 months), sex YesBaseline, OutputYesHealth Action 2.2.1, Sphere: Essential health services – child health standard 1: Prevention of vaccine-preventable diseases (Key indicator 1)Target: 95%. Upon completion of measles vaccination campaign at least 95 per cent of children aged 6–59 months have received an appropriate dose of Vitamin Apreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4The indicator applies for children living in settings where VAD is a public health problem, WHO follows the GAVA recommendation and advocates for two doses in the last year. In case there is an important difference, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs that might differently impact on girls' and boys' nutritional well being. Consider the dates of the actual vitamin A supplementation to get an indication of number of children uncovered (0 to 5 months old) and who should be included in the new supplementation programme. population surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART) F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health
NutritionN-021N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesIron supplementation coverage rate in children Proportion of children 6-59 months of age receiving micronutrient supplements that contain adequate iron IndividualPercentage Total number of children 6-59 months surveyedNumber of children 6-59 months who received micronutrient supplements with adequate iron in/with one of their meals the previous dayGeographical area, age (6-24, 24-59 months), sexNoBaseline, OutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 4.1.1, Sphere: Food security and nutrition, Appendix 5: Measures of the public health significance of micronutrient deficienciespreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4population surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health
NutritionN-022N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesIron-folic acid supplementation in pregnant womenProportion of pregnant women having received iron-folic acid contained supplementation daily in previous 6 months/during pregnancy IndividualPercentage Total number of pregnant women surveyedNumber of pregnant women who bought or received iron-folic acid contained supplementation daily in the previous 6 months during pregnancyGeographical areaYesBaseline, OutputYesSphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 2: basic and skilled support (GN 2), Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micro nutrient deficiencies standard 1: Moderate acute malnutrition (GN 6 and 7)preparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4In some countries iron-folic acid supplements are replaced by multiple micronutrients, therefore depending on the situation the indicator should be changed to "received iron-folic acid supplements "or "received multiple micronutrient supplements"Population survey with representative sampling methods (eg, MICS, DHA, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F6 Availability, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-023N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesIodized salt consumption Proportion households using adequately iodized salt in previous 6 months HouseholdsPercentage Total number of households surveyedNumber of households using adequately iodized salt (20-40 ppm) in previous 6 monthsGeographical areaNoBaseline, OutputYesSphere: Food security and nutrition, Appendix 5: Measures of the public health significance of micronutrient deficiencies, Sphere: Food security and nutrition assessment standard 2: NutritionIndicator should be equal to or greater than 90Proportion of(reference?) -Number of households using adequately iodized salt (20-40 ppm) in previous 6 monthspreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Adequately iodized salt is salt containing 15 to 40 ppm of iodine at the household level. Reference: Assessment of iodine deficiency disorders and monitoring their elimination : a guide for programme managers. 3rd edition WHO, 2008Use of "using" rather than "having regularly consumed in previous 6 months" based on recommended assessment methods, which is measuring iodine level in salt in households at a time of assessment and not collecting retrospective data (as the level of iodine in salt consumed cannot be assessed and many people do not know if salt is / was iodized). Alternative formulation: "Proportion of households using adequately iodized salt" - see reference. Apparently not a food security indicator; F1 Food Assistance, F6 Availability, H2 Child health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health
NutritionN-024N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesPrevalence rate of vitamin A deficiency(1)Proportion of children below five years of age with sub-clinical vitamin A deficiency (2) Proportion of women of reproductive age with clinical vitamin A deficiencyIndividualPercentage Total number of children below five years of age surveyed or Total number of women of reproductive age surveyed Number of children below five years of age with vitamin A deficiency (serum retinol values <0.70µmol/l) or Proportion of women of reproductive age or 15-49 years of age) with Vitamin A deficiency (serum retinol values<0.70µmol/l) Geographical area, boys and girls 0-59 months, women of reproductive age YesBaselineNoFood Security and Nutrition 4.1.1Public Health Significance: <2Proportion of normal; 2-9.9Proportion of Low; 10-19.9Proportion of Medium; >20Proportion of High (ref: WHO 1996) Preparatory Pre-crisis/Baseline FOR CHILDREN - Serum or plasma retinol levels measured in capillary or venous samples is an invasive test that is expensive if HPLC is used. Newer methods for dry blood spots with the capillary method are emerging. FOR WOMEN - Information can be ascertained verbally. Since the question is targeted at a specific subset of women, the indicator fails to capture the full range of women of reproductive ages. There is a need to standardize the phrasing of the question. WHO guideline: who.int/vmnis/retinol.pdf primary data - National Surveys, Local studies, DHS, MICS; secondary data - VMNIS F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health
NutritionN-025N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesPrevalence rate of anaemiaProportion of children below five years of age with Hb concentration of <11 g/dL Proportion of women in reproductive age with Hb concentration of <12 g/dL IndividualPercentage Total number of children below five years of age surveyed or Total number of women of reproductive age surveyedNumber of children below five years of age with Hb concentration of <11 g/dL or Number of women of reproductive age with anaemia (Hb<11g/dl for pregnant women; <12 g/dl for non pregnant women)Geographical areaNoBaseline, OutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 4.1.1Public Health Significance: <4.9Proportion of Normal/Adequate; 5-19.9Proportion of Low; 20-39.9Proportion of Medium; >40Proportion of High (ref: WHO 2001).PreparatoryPre-crisis/BaselineThe finger-prick blood sample test is easy to administer in the field. The test could be easily integrated in regular health or prenatal visit to capture all women in reproductive ages. Cost of equipment may be prohibitiveWHO guideline: who.int/indicators/haemolobin.pdf; primary data - National Surveys, Local studies, DHS, MICS; secondary data - VMNISF1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health
NutritionN-026N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesPrevalence rate of iodine deficiencyMedian urinary iodine concentration (?g/L) in children aged 6-12 years IndividualPercentage Total number of children aged 6- 12 years surveyed Median urinary iodine concentration (?g/L) in children aged 6-12 years Geographical area, age YesBaselineFood Security and Nutrition 4.1.1, Sphere: Food security and nutrition, Appendix 5: Measures of the public health significance of micronutrient deficienciesFor children under-5, Public Health significance if <100µg/l but I don't know for children 6-12 years of age (ref: WHO, UNICEF, ICCIDD 2007) Preparatory Pre-crisis/BaselineA median urinary iodine concentration in a population of < 100 ?g/l indicates that the iodine intake is insufficient. A non-invasive method of measurement, the cost of spoturine samples tests is affordable. School age children 6-12 years can be easily tested in population-based surveys. WHO guideline: apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/85972/1/WHO_NMH_NHD_EPG_13.1_eng.pdf; According to WHO ideally one should also assess PLW primary data - National Surveys, Local studies; secondary data - VMNIS F1 Food Assistance, F6 Availability, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health
NutritionN-027N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionChild morbidity Proportion of children 0-59 months whose caregiver reported an illness in the previous 2 weeks IndividualPercentage Total number of children 0 to 59 months of age surveyedNumber of children 0-59 months whose caregiver reported an illness in the previous 2 weeksGeographical areaYesBaselineNoNo thresholdpreparatory; Phase I and II; Phase II and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 4survey dataThis information may be available through the Health Cluster, but nutrition surveys may provide updated representative informationSMART surveys, Disease early warning systemsH1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H3 Communicable diseases, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-028N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionUnder-five mortalityThe rate of death among children below of 5 years of age in the populationIndividualdeath per 10,000 children under 5 years/day Total number of children under 5 years multiple by number of days in time period over 10,000 persons Total number of death in children under 5 years during time period Geographical area YesBaselineNoHealth Action 2.2.1, Sphere: Essential health services standard 1: Prioritizing health services (Key indicator 2 and GNs)See Sphere (http://www.spherehandbook.org/en/essential-health-services-standard-1-prioritising-health-services/) for emergency thresholds for different regions. When the baseline rate is unknown or of doubtful validity, agencies should aim to maintain the U5MR at least below 2.0/10,000/day preparatory; Phases I, II III and IV Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Under-five mortality rate as defined here is strictly speaking not a rate (i.e. the number of deaths divided by the number of population at risk during a certain period of time) but a probability of death derived from a life table and expressed as rate per 1000 live births These data should be taken from Health Cluster or specific mortality surveys, representative surveys, A proxy can be calculated through health facilities and community records in early phases of emergency. Under-five mortality rate measures child survival. It also reflects the social, economic and environmental conditions in which children (and others in society) live, including their health care. Because data on the incidences and prevalence of diseases (morbidity data) frequently are unavailable, mortality rates are often used to identify vulnerable populations. Under-five mortality rate is an MDG indicator Representative survey and or from health facility / community records H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-029N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingEarly initiation of breastfeedingProportion of children 0-23 months who were put to the breast within one hour of birth.IndividualPercentage Total number of women with a live birth in the X years prior to the survey Number of women with a live birth in the X years prior to the survey who put the newborn infant to the breast within one hour of birth Geographical area, sex NoBaselineNoFood Security and Nutrition 4.2.1, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 2: Basic and skilled supportNo standard; < 80Proportion of is generally a priority. Discuss high, medium and low designations as a group For Phases III-IV, an adapted indicator should be used where the same methodology is used but the denominator is infants born since onset of the emergency. (Proportion of children born since the onset of the emergency who were put to the breastfed within one hour of birth). In Phase 1 and 2, the denominator used should be infants born since onset of the emergency. In these phases opportunistic sampling will be necessary, e.g. at facilities providing obstetric services/newborn support. Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4 WHO IYCF core indicator. For preparatory phase, the WHO core indicator should be used as a baseline where the denominator is children born in the last 24 months (Proportion of children born in the last 24 months who were put to the breastfed within one hour of birth). Note: DHS data are based on the three years or five years prior to survey and MICS data are based on the two years prior to survey Preparatory, Phase III and IV: representative IYCF survey. Phase I and II: use key informant interviews and opportunistic sampling to give an ALERT indication H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, (R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-030N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingExclusive breastfeeding under 6 monthsProportion of infants 0-5 months of age who are fed exclusively with breast milk IndividualPercentage Total number of infants 0 to 5 months of age surveyedInfants 0 to 5 months of age who received only breast milk during the previous dayGeographical area, sex, age: 0-1, 2-3, 4-5 months if availableYesBaseline, OutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 4.2.1, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 2: Basic and skilled support (Key Indicator 1)No standard; < 80Proportion of is generally a priority. Discuss high, medium and low designations as a groupFor Phases III and IV, core WHO indicator should be measured. In Phases 1 and 2, it is not possible to accurately assess the exclusive breastfeeding rate in the population. Baseline information and N-40 (not breastfed) will be key information in Phases I and II.Phase 3, Phase 4 WHO IYCF core indicator. For preparatory phase, core WHO indicator should be measuredAttention should be paid on the potential difference in breastfeeding male and female infants. If difference exists, this should inform the nutritional education messages.Preparatory, Phase III and IV: representative IYCF survey. Phase I and II: use key informant interviews and opportunistic sampling to give an ALERT indication H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, (R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-031N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingContinued breastfeeding at one year and at 2 yearsProportion of children 12-15 months of age and 20-23 months of age who are fed breast milk IndividualPercentage Total number of infants 12-15 months of age and total number of infants 20-23 months of age surveyedInfants 12-15 months of age and 20-23 months of age who receive any breast milkGeographical areaNoBaseline, OutcomeYesSPHERE Food security and nutrition chapter, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 2: Basic and skilled support (Key Indicator 1)preparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4The WHO IYCF core indicator reports continued breastfeeding at 1 year. In emergencies, it is important to also monitor continued breastfeeding rate at 2 years (WHO IYCF optional indicator) as children 1-2 years are also at significant risk of increased morbidity and mortality if not breastfed in this context. Attention should be paid on the potential difference in breastfeeding male and female infants. If difference exists, this should inform the nutritional education messages.representative IYCF surveyH2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, (R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-032N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingChildren ever breastfedProportion of children born in the last 24 months who were ever breastfed IndividualPercentage Total number of infants born in the past 23 months in the surveyed areaNumber of infants 0-23 months of age who ever received breast milkGeographical areaYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSPHERE Food security and nutrition chapter, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 2: Basic and skilled supportNo standard; < 80Proportion of is generally a priority. Discuss high, medium and low designations as a groupFor measurement in Phases 1-IV, an adapted indicator should be used where the denominator should be infants born since onset of the emergency. In phases 1 and 2, opportunistic sampling will be necessary, e.g. piggy backed onto reproductive health sampling or anthropometric screening or food security assessment. Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4WHO IYCF core indicator. For preparatory phase, the core WHO Indicator should be used as a baseline where the denominator is infants born in the last 24 months. Preparatory, Phase III and IV: representative IYCF survey. Phase I and II: use key informant interviews and opportunistic sampling to give an ALERT indicationH2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, (R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-033N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingPredominant breastfeeding under 6 monthsProportion of infants 0-5 months of age who are predominantly breastfed IndividualPercentage Total number of infants 0 to 5 months of age surveyedNumber of infants 0-5 months of age who are predominantly breastfedGeographical area, sexNoBaselineNoSPHERE Food security and nutrition chapter, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 2: Basic and skilled supportNo standard; < 80Proportion of is generally a priority. Discuss high, medium and low designations as a grouppreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4 WHO IYCF optional indicatorAttention should be paid on the potential difference in breastfeeding male and female infants. If difference exists, this should inform the nutritional education messages.representative IYCF surveyH2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, (R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-034N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingBottle feedingProportion of children 0-23 months of age who are fed with a bottle IndividualPercentage Total number of infants 0-23 months surveyedNumber of infants 0-23 months who are fed with a bottleGeographical area, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSPHERE Food security and nutrition chapter, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 2: Basic and skilled supportpreparatory; Phases I, II, III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4 WHO IYCF optional indicator. This indicator determines the use of bottles which carry risk; is not an indicator of use of infant formula or breast milk substitutes, since it records any item fed using a bottle including breast milk, water, semi-solids, etc.). Preparatory, Phase III and IV: representative IYCF survey. Phase I and II use key informant interviews and opportunistic sampling to give an ALERT indicationH2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-035N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingMinimum dietary diversityProportion of children 6-23 months of age who receive foods from 4 or more food groups IndividualPercentage Total number of children 6-23 months surveyedNumber of children 6-23 months who receive food from 4 or more food groupsGeographical area, sexNoBaseline, OutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 4.2.2, Sphere: Food security and nutrition assessment standard 1: Food security, Sphere: Food security - food transfers standard 1: General nutrition requirementsNo standard; < 80Proportion of is generally a priority. Discuss high, medium and low designations as a grouppreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4This indicator is adapted from the WHO IYCF core indicator for children 6-23 months. Data should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific limitation girls or boys might face in accessing dietary diversity. In case there is an important difference, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs (i.e. food taboos) that might differently impact on girls' and boys' dietary diversity.representative IYCF surveyF3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health
NutritionN-036N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingMinimum meal frequencyProportion of children 6-23 months who received solid, semi-solid or soft foods the minimum number of times or more. IndividualPercentage Total number of children 6-23 months surveyedNumber of children 6-23 months who received solid, semi-solid or soft foods for the minimum number of times or moreGeographical area, sexNoBaseline, OutcomeNoFood Security and Nutrition 4.2.2, Sphere: Food security and nutrition assessment standard 1: Food security, Sphere: Food security - food transfers standard 1: General nutrition requirementsNo standard; < 80Proportion of is generally a priority. Discuss high, medium and low designations as a grouppreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4 WHO IYCF core indicatorrepresentative IYCF surveyF3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health
NutritionN-037N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingMinimum acceptable dietProportion of children 6-23 months of age who receive a minimum acceptable diet (apart from breast milk) IndividualPercentage Total number of children 6-23 months surveyedNumber of children 6-23 months who receive a minimum acceptable dietGeographical area, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 4.2.2, Sphere: Food security and nutrition assessment standard 1: Food security, Sphere: Food security - food transfers standard 1: General nutrition requirementsNo standard; < 80Proportion of is generally a priority. Discuss high, medium and low designations as a grouppreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4 WHO IYCF core indicatorrepresentative IYCF surveyF3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health
NutritionN-038N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingIntroduction of solid, semi-solid or soft food Proportion of children 6-8 months of age who received solid, semi-solid or soft foods during the previous day IndividualPercentage Total number of infants 5-8 months surveyedNumber of infants 5-8 months who received solid, semi-solid or soft foods during the previous dayGeographical area, sexNoBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Food security and nutrition assessment standard 1: Food security, Sphere: Food security - food transfers standard 1: General nutrition requirementsNo standard; < 80Proportion of is generally a priority. Discuss high, medium and low designations as a grouppreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4 WHO IYCF core indicator. Need guidance on sample sizerepresentative IYCF surveyF3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health
NutritionN-039N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingNot breastfedProportion of infants 0<12 months and 12<24 months not breastfed IndividualPercentage Total number of children 0<12 months and 12<24 months surveyedNumber of infants 0-12 months and 12-24 months not breastfedGeographical area; 0-<12 months, 12-<24 months, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Food security and nutrition assessment standard 1: Food security, Sphere: Food security - food transfers standard 1: General nutrition requirementsCalculate this indicator based on standardized data collected. In phases 1 and 2, an indication of the proportion of non-breastfed infants should be estimated based on key informant interviews and opportunistic sampling.Phase 1, Phase 2This is not a standard indicator. However it is possible to calculate this indicator using standardized data collected to produce WHO IYCF core indicators. Preparatory: calculate this indicator based on standardized data collected. In phases 1 and 11, an indication of the proportion of non-breastfed infants should be estimated based on key informant interviews and opportunistic sampling.Need to raise this with WHO to see how we might develop this as a standard indicator to report in emergency prone contexts.Preparatory, Phases 111 and IV: Indicator produced from data collected from MICS/DHS. Phase I and II will use key informant interviews and opportunistic sampling to give an ALERT indication.H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-040N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingDistribution of infant formula, dried or liquid milk to the affected populationConfirmed distribution of infant formula, dried or liquid milk to the affected population IndividualYes/NoN/AN/AGeographical areaYesBaseline, OutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 4.2.1, Sphere: Food security - food transfers standard 2: Appropriateness and acceptability (Key indicator 3)zero tolerance Phases I,II, III and IV.Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4This is an alert to problems. Any general distribution of these products to the affected population is a concern as there is a risk of spill over to infants and young children.Key informant interviews (include logistics and any agencies involved in distribution, as well as health and nutrition staff and caregivers). Distribution reports. Observations.H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-041N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingInappropriate distribution of infant formula, dried or liquid milk to children 0-<2 yearsConfirmed distribution of infant formula, dried or liquid milk to children 0-< 2 years CommunityYes/NoN/AN/AGeographical areaYesBaseline, OutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 4.2.1, Sphere: Food security - food transfers standard 2: Appropriateness and acceptability (Key indicator 3)zero tolerance Phases I,II,III and IV.Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4This is an alert to problems. Inappropriate distribution is where distribution is not in accordance with the Operational Guidance on IFE in meeting criteria for assessment of need, skilled support available, guaranteed continuity of supplies, individual follow up, availability of storage and preparation facilities, appropriate labelling, and monitoring for spill over to breastfed infants. Key informant interviews (include logistics and any agencies involved in distribution, as well as health and nutrition staff and caregivers). Distribution reports. Observations.H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-042N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition SAM new admissionsNumber of cases with severe acute malnutrition newly admitted for treatment FacilityNumberN/ANumber of cases with severe acute malnutrition newly admitted for treatmentGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5 months, children 6-59 months, people 60 years of age and older, inpatient/outpatient, rural/urban/IDPs YesOutputYesSphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutritionN/APhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4The total number of newly admitted children should be based on the aggregate monthly admissions data.We recognize that PLW with SAM are missing from this disaggregation, however this is work in progress to define case definitions. The reporting period is usually monthly, in major emergencies the reporting can be weekly, bi-weekly. Admission rates should be analysed in order to identify if boys, girls, men, women are equally accessing nutrition services. If a group identified as potentially vulnerable, is not oriented to the nutrition centres, it is important to understand why this is (i.e. gender-based discrimination, mobility restrictions, etc.) and to take required actions.SAM management reportingF1 Food Assistance, H2 Child health, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-043N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition SAM currently treatedNumber of cases with severe acute malnutrition receiving treatment FacilityNumberN/ANumber of cases with severe acute malnutrition receiving treatmentGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5 months, children 6-59 months, people 60 years of age and older, inpatient/outpatient, rural/urban/IDPs YesProcessNoSphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutritionN/APhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4The total number of children admitted will be based on the target set (the estimated burden of malnutrition x the total number of children who can be reached). This can be over a specified time period.We recognize that PLW with SAM are missing from this disaggregation, however this is work in progress to define case definitions. The reporting period is usually monthly, in major emergencies the reporting can be weekly, bi-weekly. Admission rates should be analysed in order to identify if boys, girls, men, women are equally accessing nutrition services. If a group identified as potentially vulnerable, is not oriented to the nutrition centres, it is important to understand why this is (i.e. gender-based discrimination, mobility restrictions, etc.) and to take required actions.SAM management reportingH2 Child health
NutritionN-044N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSAM treatment coverageProportion of cases with severe acute malnutrition receiving treatment FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with severe acute malnutritionNumber of cases with severe acute malnutrition receiving for treatmentGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5 months, children 6-59 months, people 60 years of age and older, inpatient/outpatient, rural/urban/IDPs YesOutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 3.2, Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutrition (Key Indicator 2)Sphere Minimum Standards: >50% for rural; >70% for urban; >90% for IDPs"Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Definitions of different types of coverage are being developed. Admission rates should be analysed in order to identify if boys, girls, men, women are equally accessing nutrition services. If a group identified as potentially vulnerable, is not oriented to the nutrition centres, it is important to understand why this is (i.e. gender-based discrimination, mobility restrictions, etc.) and to take required actions.SQUEAC surveysH2 Child health
NutritionN-045N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSAM discharged diedProportion of cases with severe acute malnutrition who died during treatment FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with severe acute malnutrition dischargedNumber of cases with severe acute malnutrition who died during treatment Geographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5 months, children 6-59 months, people 60 years of age and older, inpatient/outpatient, rural/urban/IDPs YesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 3.2, Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutrition (Key Indicator 3)Sphere Standards: should be less than 10%Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4SAM management reportingH2 Child health
NutritionN-046N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSAM discharged recoveredProportion of discharged cases with severe acute malnutrition who recovered FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with severe acute malnutrition dischargedNumber of discharged cases with severe acute malnutrition who recoveredGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 0-59 months, 6-59 months, people 60 years and older, other groups, inpatient/outpatient YesOutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 3.2, Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutrition (Key Indicator 3)Sphere Standards: should be more than 75%Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4SAM management reporting
NutritionN-047N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSAM discharged defaultedProportion of discharged cases with severe acute malnutrition who defaulted FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with severe acute malnutrition dischargedNumber of discharged cases with severe acute malnutrition who defaultedGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5, children 6-59 months, people 60 years old and older, other groups, confirmed/non-confirmedYesOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 3.2, Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutrition (Key Indicator 3)Sphere Standards: should be less than 15%Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Specify timing for defaulters. Unconfirmed defaulter includes defaulted, moved, died. . If you have capacity to confirm the reason for defaulting, correct the relevant discharged indicatorsSAM management reporting
NutritionN-048N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSAM discharged non-recoveredProportion of discharged cases with severe acute malnutrition who non-recovered FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with severe acute malnutrition dischargedNumber of discharged cases with severe acute malnutrition who non-recoveredGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 0-59 months, 6-59 months, people 60 years and older, other groups, inpatient/outpatient NoOutput, ProcessYesNAPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Specify timing for non-recovery. Non-response to treatment should be identified and acted upon with the full medical investigation.SAM management reportingH2 Child health
NutritionN-049N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSAM referredNumber of cases with severe acute malnutrition referred to inpatient care or hospital FacilityNumberN/ANumber of cases with severe acute malnutrition referred to inpatient care or hospitalGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 6-59 months, people 60 years and older, other groupsNoOutput, ProcessYesNAPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4SAM management reportingH1 General clinical services & essential trauma care
NutritionN-050N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSAM average weight gainAverage weight gain for cases with severe acute malnutrition receiving treatment Facilitygram weight gain per kilogram of body mass per day "Calculating weight gain : The example is for weight gain over 7 days, but the same procedure can be applied to any interval: * subtract from today’s weight (in g) the child’s weight 7 days earlier ; * divide by 7 to determine the average daily weight gain (g/day) ; * divide by the child’s average weight in kg to calculate the weight gain as g/kg/da" "Calculating weight gain : The example is for weight gain over 7 days, but the same procedure can be applied to any interval: * subtract from today’s weight (in g) the child’s weight 7 days earlier ; * divide by 7 to determine the average daily weight gain (g/day) ; * divide by the child’s average weight in kg to calculate the weight gain as g/kg/da" Geographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 6-59 months, people 60 years old and older, other groups NoOutputYesSphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutritionpoor <5 g/kg/d, moderate 5-10 g/kg/d, good >10 g/kg/d Phase III and IV Phase 3, Phase 4Average Daily Weight Gain is calculated on a randomized sample of cured discharges for kwashiorkor and marasmus. A reasonable randomized sample of discharged cured cases is 20. If lower numbers have been discharged cured during the period of reporting, take all discharged cured. See Guidelines for the inpatient treatment of severely malnourished children, WHO 2003 SAM management reporting
NutritionN-051N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSAM average length of stayAverage duration of SAM treatment FacilitydaysNumber of beneficiariesSum of lengths of stay for beneficiaries in therapeutic treatment programme (in days)Geographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 6-59 months, PLW, people 60 years old and older, other groupsNoOutputYesSphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutritionAccording to guidelines in usePhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Average Length Of Stay is calculated on a randomized sample of cured discharges for kwashiorkor and marasmus. A reasonable randomized sample of discharged cured cases is 20. If lower numbers have been discharged cured during the period of reporting, take all discharged cured.Guidelines define limits for the mean length of stay for treatment and are aimed at avoiding prolonged recovery periods. Mean length of stay will differ depending on the guidelines in use and so should be adjusted to national context and guidelines in use. (SPHERE)SAM management reporting
NutritionN-052N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSAM follow-upProportion of severe acute malnutrition problem cases receiving treatment in need for follow-up at home who are visited at home FacilityPercentageTotal number of severe acute malnutrition problem cases receiving treatment in need for follow-up at homeNumber of severe acute malnutrition problem cases receiving treatment in need for follow-up at home who are visited at homeGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 6-59 months, other groupsNoProcessNoN/APhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4This can be calculated through a coverage survey or using a proxy indicator from the reporting systemExample of SAM problem cases: defaulting, non-response to treatment, refusal referral. Each programme will define which cases are problem ones and should be followed up at home.
NutritionN-053N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionAccess to SAM servicesProportion of the severe acute malnutrition target population living within less than one day's return walk from management of SAM site IndividualPercentageEstimated SAM target population (based on the prevalence of SAM in the area) Number of the severe acute malnutrition target population living within less than one day's return walk from management of severe acute malnutrition site Geographical area, rural/urban, group of beneficiaries: children 6-59 months, other groups NoOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 3.2, Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micro nutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutrition (Key indicator 1)SPHERE: More than 90 per cent of the target population is within less than one day’s return walk (including time for treatment) of the programme site. Phase III and IV Phase 3, Phase 4This can be calculated through a coverage survey or using a proxy indicator from the reporting system Management includes: detection, diagnosis, triage, treatment, follow-up at health facility and/or home for treatment progress, prevention of adverse effects, rehabilitation SQUEAC survey P1 (PC) Child Protection, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-054N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition MAM new admissionsNumber of cases with moderate acute malnutrition newly admitted for treatment FacilityNumberN/ANumber of cases with moderate acute malnutrition newly admitted for treatmentGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5 months, children 6-59 months, PLW, people 60 years of age and older, inpatient/outpatient, rural/urban/IDPs YesOutputYesSphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micro-nutrient deficiencies standard 1: Moderate acute malnutritionN/APhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4MAM management reportingF1 Food Assistance, H2 Child health, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-055N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition MAM currently treatedNumber of cases with moderate acute malnutrition receiving treatment FacilityNumberN/ANumber of cases with moderate acute malnutrition receiving treatmentGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5 months, children 6-59 months, PLW, people 60 years of age and older, inpatient/outpatient, rural/urban/IDPs YesProcessNoSphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micro-nutrient deficiencies standard 1: Moderate acute malnutritionN/APhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4MAM management reporting
NutritionN-056N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionMAM treatment coverageProportion of cases with moderate acute malnutrition receiving treatment FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with moderate acute malnutritionNumber of cases with moderate acute malnutrition receiving for treatmentGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5 months, children 6-59 months, PLW, people 60 years of age and older, inpatient/outpatient, rural/urban/IDPs YesOutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 3.1, Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micro nutrient deficiencies standard 1: Moderate acute malnutrition (Key indicator 2)geographical area or impact area: Sphere Minimum Standards: >50% for rural; >70% for urban; >90% for camps"Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4SQUEAC survey
NutritionN-057N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionMAM discharged diedProportion of cases with moderate acute malnutrition who died during treatment FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with moderate acute malnutrition dischargedNumber of cases with moderate acute malnutrition who died during treatmentGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5 months, children 6-59 months, people 60 years of age and older, inpatient/outpatient, rural/urban/IDPs YesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 3.1Sphere Standards: should be less than 3%Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4MAM management reportingH2 Child health
NutritionN-058N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionMAM discharged recoveredProportion of discharged cases with moderate acute malnutrition who recovered FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with moderate acute malnutrition dischargedNumber of discharged cases with moderate acute malnutrition who recoveredGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 0-59 months, 6-59 months, PLW, people 60 years and older, other groups, inpatient/outpatient YesOutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 3.1Sphere Standards: should be more than 75%Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4MAM management reporting
NutritionN-059N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionMAM discharged defaultedProportion of discharged cases with moderate acute malnutrition who defaulted FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with moderate acute malnutrition dischargedNumber of discharged cases with moderate acute malnutrition who defaultedGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5, children 6-59 months, PLW, people 60 years old and older, other groups, confirmed/non-confirmedYesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 3.1Sphere Standards: should be less than 15%Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Where possible, it can be useful to break this indicator down to confirmed and non confirmed defaulters as defaulters can mask high death rates if not confirmed. This can be an optional category where capacity to trace defaulters is limited MAM management reporting
NutritionN-060N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionMAM discharged non-recoveredProportion of discharged cases with moderate acute malnutrition who non-recovered FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with moderate acute malnutrition dischargedNumber of discharged cases with moderate acute malnutrition who non-recoveredGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 0-59 months, 6-59 months, PLW, people 60 years and older, other groups, inpatient/outpatient NoProcessNoPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4MAM management reporting
NutritionN-061N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionMAM referredNumber of cases with moderate acute malnutrition referred for treatment of severe acute malnutrition, to inpatient care or hospital FacilityNumberN/ANumber of cases with moderate acute malnutrition referred to inpatient care or hospitalGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 6-59 months, PLW, people 60 years and older, other groupsNoProcessNoPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4MAM management reportingH1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health
NutritionN-062N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionMAM follow-upProportion of moderate acute malnutrition problem cases receiving treatment in need for follow-up at home who are visited at home FacilityPercentageTotal number of moderate acute malnutrition problem cases receiving treatment in need for follow-up at homeNumber of moderate acute malnutrition problem cases receiving treatment in need for follow-up at home who are visited at homeGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 6-59 months, other groupsNoProcessNoPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4This can be calculated through a coverage survey or using a proxy indicator from the reporting systemMAM management reporting and SQUEAC survey
NutritionN-063N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionAccess to MAM servicesProportion of the moderate acute malnutrition target population living within less than one day's return walk from management of MAM site IndividualPercentage Estimated MAM target population (based on the prevalence of MAM in the area) Number of the moderate acute malnutrition target population living within less than one day's return walk from management of moderate acute or malnutrition site Geographical area, rural/urban, group of beneficiaries: children 6-59 months, other groups YesOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 3.1SPHERE: More than 90 per cent of the target population is within less than one day’s return walk (including time for treatment) of the programme site. Phase III and IV Phase 3, Phase 4This can be calculated through a coverage survey or using a proxy indicator from the reporting system MAM management reporting and SQUEAC survey
NutritionN-064N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionBSFPs coverageProportion of target beneficiaries enrolled in blanket supplementary feeding programme IndividualPercentageTotal number of beneficiaries meeting the selection criteria for the blanket supplementary feeding programmeNumber of target beneficiaries meeting the selection criteria for the blanket supplementary feeding programme enrolledGeographical area, rural/urban/IDPs, sex, group of beneficiaries based on national criteriaYesOutputYesN/APhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4The total number of children admitted will be based on the target set (the estimated burden of malnutrition x the total number of children who can be reached). This can be over a specified time period.BSFP management reporting and coverage survey
NutritionN-065N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionChildren ScreenedNumber of children screened for acute malnutrition in a community IndividualNumberN/ANumber of children screened for acute malnutrition in a communityGeographical area, sex, rural/urban/IDP, group of beneficiaries: children 6-59 months, PLW, other groupsNoOutputYesN/APhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4This can be calculated through a coverage survey or using a proxy indicator from the reporting systemSAM and MAM management reports at district or higher levelH2 Child health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-066N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesIron-folic acid supplementation coverage in adolescent girlsProportion of adolescent girls receiving micronutrient supplements that contain adequate iron Individual or facilityPercentageEstimated total number of adolescent girls who meet target criteria for iron-folic acid supplementationNumber of adolescent girls who received micronutrient supplements with adequate iron-folic acid in/with one of their meals the previous dayGeographical areaNoOutputYespreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Where a survey has been done, these data should be utilized, otherwise administrative or facility level data can be utilized, however a caution should be paid that denominator of this coverage utilizes estimated number of people that meets criteria for supplementation. Population survey with representative sampling methods (eg, MICS, DHA, SMART)H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health
NutritionN-067N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesWomen iodine supplementation coverageProportion of women of child-bearing age who received iodine supplements Individual or facilityPercentageEstimated total number of women of child-bearing ageNumber of women of child-bearing age who received iodine supplementsGeographical area, age groupNoOutputYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Where a survey has been done, these data should be utilized, otherwise administrative or facility level data can be utilized, however a caution should be paid that denominator of this coverage utilizes estimated number of people that meets criteria for supplementation. Iodine supplements for women and/or children according to guideline (http://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/micronutrients/WHOStatement__IDD_pregnancy.pdf). H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health
NutritionN-068N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesDeworming coverage in childrenProportion of children 12-59 months who received deworming medication in the previous 6 months Individual or facilityPercentageEstimated total number of children 12-59 monthsNumber of children 12-59 months who received deworming medication in the previous 6 monthsGeographical area, sexNoOutputYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Where a survey has been done, these data should be utilized, otherwise administrative or facility level data can be utilized, however a caution should be paid that denominator of this coverage utilizes estimated number of people that meets criteria for supplementation. H2 Child health
NutritionN-069N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesDeworming coverage in adolescentsProportion of adolescent girls who received deworming medication in the previous 6 months Individual or facilityPercentageEstimated total number of adolescent girlsNumber of adolescent girls who received deworming medication in the previous 6 monthsGeographical areaNoOutputYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Where a survey has been done, these data should be utilized, otherwise administrative or facility level data can be utilized, however a caution should be paid that denominator of this coverage utilizes estimated number of people that meets criteria for supplementation. H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-070N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesDeworming coverage in pregnant womenProportion of mothers of children 0-59 months of age who took deworming medication during the last pregnancy. Individual or facilityPercentageEstimated total number of mothers of children 0-59 months of ageNumber of mothers of children 0-59 months of age who took deworming medication during the last pregnancyGeographical areaNoOutputYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Where a survey has been done, these data should be utilized, otherwise administrative or facility level data can be utilised, however a caution should be paid that denominator of this coverage utilizes estimated number of people that meets criteria for supplementation. H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-071N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesMultiple micronutrients coverageProportion of target population that received multiple micronutrient powder/capsules Individual or facilityPercentageEstimated total number of target population that meets selection criteriaNumber of target population that received multiple micronutrient powder/capsulesGeographical area, sex, age groupYesOutputYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Countries or affected areas may choose to modify the age group to 6-23 months or 6-36 months depending on needs. Where a survey has been done, these data should be utilized, otherwise administrative or facility level data can be utilised, however a caution should be paid that denominator of this coverage utilizes estimated number of people that meets criteria for supplementation. Capsules are used for PLW supplementation and powders are used for childrenH2 Child health
NutritionN-072N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesMicronutrient knowledge (in-depth)Proportion of target population who knows key elements of the nutrition messages provided on availability, use and benefits of micronutrient supplements or micronutrient rich or fortified foods/ food supplements IndividualPercentageEstimated total number of target population that meets selection criteriaNumber of target population that meets selection criteria who know key elements of the nutrition messages provided on availability, use and benefits of micronutrient supplements or micronutrient rich or fortified foods/ food supplementsGeographical area, sex, age groupNoOutputYestarget - 85%Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Attention should be paid on how mothers/fathers, women/men are equally knowledgeable about micronutrients. It is important to ensure that target group consists of both males and females.SurveyH2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-073N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesZinc utilization for diarrhoea treatmentProportion of non-SAM children with diarrhoea treated with ORS supplemented with zinc Individual or facilityPercentageTotal number of non-SAM children with diarrhoea treatedNumber of non-SAM children with diarrhoea treated with ORS supplemented with zincGeographical areaNoOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 3.3Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4H2 Child health
NutritionN-074N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesProphylactic zinc supplementation in children coverageProportion of children received prophylactic zinc supplements according to national protocols IndividualPercentageTotal number of children eligible to receive prophylactic zinc supplements according to national protocolsNumber of children received prophylactic zinc supplements according to national protocolsGeographical area, sex, age groupNoOutputYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Only applicable for countries where zinc supplementation for prophylaxis is a policyH2 Child health
NutritionN-075N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesCalcium supplementation in pregnant womenProportion of pregnant women who received calcium supplements during their last pregnancy IndividualPercentageTotal number of pregnant women eligible to receive calcium supplements during their last pregnancyNumber of pregnant women who received calcium supplements during their last pregnancyGeographical area, age group, pregnancy statusNoOutputYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Where a survey has been done, these data should be utilized, otherwise administrative or facility level data can be utilized, however a caution should be paid that denominator of this coverage utilizes estimated number of people that meets criteria for supplementation. In populations where calcium intake is low, calcium supplementation is recommended for the prevention of pre-eclampsia among pregnant women, particularly those at higher risk of hypertension. Calcium for pregnant women http://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/micronutrients/guidelines/calcium_supplementation/en/index.html)H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-076N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingAccess to breastfeeding corners Proportion of breastfeeding mothers of children 0-2 years with access to breastfeeding corners IndividualPercentageNumber of breastfeeding mothers of children 0-2 years of ageNumber of breastfeeding mothers of children 0-2 years of age with access to breastfeeding cornersGeographical areaYesOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 2.2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P5 Vulnerability, S1.2 Assistance
NutritionN-077N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingBreastfeeding support inclusionProportion of programmes that includes support of breastfeeding mothers as a specific programme component FacilityPercentageNumber of programmesNumber of programmes where breastfeeding mothers receive support as a specific componentGeographical areaYesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-078N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingProportion of mothers relactatedProportion of mothers who successfully relactated FacilityNumberTotal number of mothers who received relactation supportNumber of mothers who successfully relactatedGeographical areaYesOutcomeYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Need to define criteria for "successful" relactation
NutritionN-079N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingConsumption of iron-rich or iron-fortified foodsProportion of children 6-23 months of age who receive an iron-rich food or iron-fortified food that is specially designed for infants and young children, or that is fortified in the home. IndividualPercentageTotal number of children 6-23 monthsNumber of children 6-23 months who receive an iron-rich food or iron fortified foodGeographical areaYesOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 2.2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4F1 Food Assistance, H2 Child health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health
NutritionN-080N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingProportion of FBFProportion of children 6-23 months received fortified blended foods IndividualPercentageTotal number of children 6-23 monthsNumber of children 6-23 months received fortified blended foodsGeographical areaNoOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 2.2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4F1 Food Assistance
NutritionN-081N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingInfants who have access to BMS supplies and supportProportion of non-breastfed infants under 6 months of age who have access to BMS supplies and support IndividualPercentageTotal number of non-breastfed infants under 6 months of age in surveyed areaTotal number of non-breastfed infants under 6 months of age who have access to BMS supplies and supportGeographical areaNoProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-082N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingBMS targetingProportion of programmes where BMS are appropriately targeted, based on qualified assessment and governed by accepted criteria FacilityPercentageTotal number of programmes where BMS are providedNumber of programmes where BMS are appropriately targetedGeographical areaYesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-083N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingPreparation BMS educationProportion of programmes where education and practical training on safe preparation of BMS for caregivers is included FacilityPercentageTotal number of programmes where BMS are distributedNumber of programmes where education and practical training for caregivers on safe preparation od BMS is includedGeographical areaNoProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Should be targeted to caregivers or children that will receive BMS (avoid spill over effect)(R) Early Recovery, W1 Hygiene Promotion
NutritionN-084N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingBMS follow upProportion of programmes where there is follow-up of BMS recipients, both at distribution point and at household level FacilityPercentageTotal number of programmes with BMS distributionNumber of programmes where there is follow-up of BMS recipients at distribution point and at household levelGeographical areaNoProcessNoPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-085N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingBMS labelling languageProportion of programmes where BMS used labelled in an appropriate language FacilityPercentageTotal number of programmes where BMS are usedNumber of programmes where BMS used are labelled in an appropriate languageGeographical areaNoProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-086N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingBMS shelf lifeProportion of programmes where distributed BMS DOES NOT have a shelf-life of at least six months FacilityPercentageNumber of programs where BMS are providedNumber of programs where BMS does not have a shelf life of at least six monthsGeographical areaNoProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.1Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-087N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingNo secure supply of BMSProportion of programmes where a secure supply of BMS been HAS NOT been established FacilityPercentageNumber of programmes where BMS are distributedNumber of programmes where a secure supply of BMS have not been establishedGeographical areaNoProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-088N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingAdmissions with BMSProportion of children who were already on BMS when admitted to the programme IndividualNumberTotal number of children admitted to programmeNumber of children admitted to programme who were already BMSGeographical areaNoProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.2target: 100%Phases I, II, III, IVPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-089N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingInfants in need of BMSProportion of children admitted to programme who are in need of BMS IndividualNumberTotal number of children admitted to programmeNumber of children admitted to programme who are in need of BMSGeographical areaNoProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.2Phases I, II, III, IVPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-090N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingBaby bottles or teats distributionProportion of programmes where baby bottles or teats are being used and/or distributed as feeding utensils? FacilityPercentageNumber of programmes where BMS are distributedNumber of programmes where baby bottles or teats are being used or distributedGeographical areaYesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.1Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-091N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingBMS distributionProportion of programmes where BMS are distributed as part of the food aid distribution FacilityPercentageNumber of programmes where BMS are distributedNumber of programmes where BMS are distributed as part of food aidGeographical areaYesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.1Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4F1 Food Assistance
NutritionN-092N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingCode violationsNumber of recorded Code violations CommunityNumberN/ANumber of recorded Code violationsGeographical areaNoProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.1Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4F1 Food Assistance
NutritionN-093N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingDonations interceptedNumber of donations of BMS, complementary foods, bottles or teats successfully intercepted Facility or communityNumberN/ANumber of donations of BMS, complementary foods, bottles or teats successfully interceptedGeographical areaYesOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 2.1Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4F1 Food Assistance
NutritionN-094N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingDonations not intercepted Number of donations of BMS, complementary foods, bottles or teats not successfully intercepted Facility or communityNumberN/ANumber of donations of BMS, complementary foods, bottles or teats not successfully interceptedGeographical areaNoOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 2.1Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4F1 Food Assistance
NutritionN-095N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingThe code labelling of BMSProportion of programmes where the labels of BMS DO NOT comply with the labelling requirements of the Code FacilityPercentageNumber of programs where BMS are providedNumber of programs where labels do not comply with the CODEGeographical areaNoProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.1Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-096N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingIYCF in HIV contextProportion of programmes that follows national policy on HIV FacilityPercentageTotal number of programmesNumber of programmes where individual risk assessment (applying AFASS criteria) is carried out on an ongoing basis for artificially fed infantsGeographical areaNoProcessNoPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-097N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding IYCF supportProportion of caregivers received skilled IYCF support IndividualPercentageTotal number of caregivers eligible to receive skilled IYCF support according to national protocols surveyedNumber of caregivers received skilled IYCF supportGeographical area, sexNoOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 2.2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4"skilled "should be defined
NutritionN-098N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingIYCF-E orphans and unaccompanied children receiving servicesNumber of orphans and unaccompanied infants and children 0-23 months who receive nutritional and care support IndividualNumberTotal number of orphans, unaccompanied infants and young children in need of nutritional care and supportNumber of orphans, unaccompanied young children and young children who receive nutritional care and supportGeographical areaNoOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 2.2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-099N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingVoucher/cash IYCFNumber of voucher/cash programmes targeting families with children U2 with an IYCF objective FacilityNumberN/ANumber of voucher/cash programmes targeting families with children U2 with an IYCF objectiveGeographical areaNoOutputYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-100N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingVoucher/cash infantsNumber of voucher/cash programmes targeting families with infants under 6 months with a breastfeeding objective FacilityNumberN/ANumber of voucher/cash programmes targeting families with infants under 6 months with a breastfeeding objectiveGeographical areaNoOutputYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-101N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingCode violations followed upProportion of reported code violations which were followed up FacilityPercentageNumber of reported code violationsNumber of reported code violations which were followed upGeographical areaYesOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 2.1, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 1: Policy guidance and coordination (Key indicator 4)Target - 100%All phasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-102N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesFocus group discussionsProportion of nutrition programmes that had separate focus group discussions with affected girls, women, boys and men during assessment, planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation FacilityPercentageTotal number of nutrition programmesNumber of nutrition programmes that had separate focus group discussions with affected girls, women, boys and men during assessment, planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluationGeographical area, sex, age, phase of project (assessment, planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation), response domainNoProcessNoSphere: Core Standard 1: People-cantered humanitarian responseTarget - 100%All phasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4(R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-103N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesSingle sex consultations on effective responseProportion of partners routinely conducting single sex consultations to discuss about how effectively they respond to distinct nutritional needs of the affected population and to address any challenges in accessing assistance FacilityPercentageTotal number of partners responding to the emergencyNumber of partners routinely conducting single sex consultations to discuss about how effectively they respond to distinct nutritional needs of the affected population and to address any challenges in accessing assistanceResponse domainNoProcessNoSphere: Core Standard 1: People-cantered humanitarian responseTarget - 100%Phases III, IVPhase 3, Phase 4(R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-104N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesSatisfaction with access to servicesProportion of target population disaggregated by sex satisfied with their access to services at the end of the project IndividualPercentageTotal number of men/women benefited from the projectNumber of men/women satisfied with their access to services at the end of the projectGeographical area, sex, response domainNoOutputYesTarget - 100%Phases III, IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-105N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesKnowledge of good nutrition/IYCF practicesProportion of target population disaggregated by sex who have increased knowledge of good nutrition/IYCF practices at the end of the project IndividualPercentageTotal number of men and total number of women participated in the projectNumber of men/women who have increased knowledge of good nutrition practices at the end of the projectGeographical area, response domainNoOutputYesTarget - 100%Phases III, IVPhase 3, Phase 4(R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-106N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesMen participation in nutrition programmesProportion of men participated in nutritional education programmes IndividualPercentageTotal number of people participated in nutritional education programmesNumber of men participated in nutritional education programmesGeographical area, response domainNoOutputYesPhases II, III, IV Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4(R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-107N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingIYCF policyA national and/or agency policy is in place that addresses IYCF and reflects the Operational Guidance on IFE CommunityYes/NoN/AN/AN/AYesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.1, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 1: Policy guidance and coordination (Key indicator 1)YesAll phasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4(R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-108N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingIYCF coordinating bodyA lead coordinating body on IYCF is designated CommunityYes/NoN/AN/AN/AYesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.1, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 1: Policy guidance and coordination (Key indicator 2)YesAll phasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4(R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-109N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingBody to deal with donationsA body to deal with any donations of BMS, milk products, bottles and teats is designated CommunityYes/NoN/AN/AN/AYesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.1, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 1: Policy guidance and coordination (Key indicator 3)YesAll phasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-110N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingIYCF-E CapacityProportion of emergency-affected areas that have an adequate number of skilled IYCF counsellors and/or functioning support groups CommunityPercentageTotal number of emergency-affected areasNumber of emergency-affected areas that have an adequate number of skilled IYCF counsellors and/or functioning support groupsGeographical areaYesBaseline, OutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 2.2, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 2: Basic and skilled supportPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4H2 Child health