Global ClustersCodeSub-domainTitleDescriptionUnit of MeasurementUnit DescriptionDenominatorNumeratorDisaggregationKey indicatorTypesResponse MonitoringStandardsThresholdGuidance on phasesPhase applicabilityGeneral guidanceGuidance for pre-crisis/baselineCommentsData SourcesSector cross-tagging
Food Security;Health;Logistics;Protection;Nutrition;Water Sanitation Hygiene;Camp Coordination / Management;Education;Emergency Shelter and NFI;Emergency Telecommunications;Early RecoveryAAP-1Feedback MechanismsNumber of feedback received (including complaints) which have been acted uponFeedback mechanisms provide a means for all those affected to comment on and thus indirectly influence programme planning and implementation (see HAP’s ‘participation’ benchmark). They include focus group discussions, surveys, interviews and meetings on ‘lessons learnt’ with a representative sample of all the affected population (see ECB’s Good Enough Guide for tools and Guidance notes 3–4). The findings and the agency’s actions in response to feedback should be systematically shared with the affected population.InstitutionNumberN/ANumber of organisations with formal feedback mechanisms in placeYesProcessYesHAP Benchmark 3 on Sharing information, Sphere Core Standard 1: People-centered humanitarian response, The Good Enough Guide - Section 5: Use feedback to improve project impactAll PhasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Feedback mechanisms can take many forms. Whatever the most appropriate channels are should be used; radio talk back programmes, online surveys, sms and twitter inputs, regularised focus group discussions with selected members of the population, suggestions and complaints boxes, designation of sector or camp committees to feedback on specific topics, prioritisation assessments, through dedicated community engagement staff among many other possibilities. Sex, age, ability or other relevant diversity disaggregation of the feedback received is important in order to understand who is most at risk and to take responsible actions. It is important to remember that feedback needs to be collected, digested and acted upon, and then the results of those actions relayed to the population, then another round of feedback can begin on the changed situation. This is the 'feedback loop' - an ongoing dialogue between the humanitarian community and the affected population. Remember that much of this is already happening - through food monitors, community outreach programmes, ongoing assessments - the important thing is to keep the feedback loop continuing.• Clusters and partners have a formal, appropriate feedback mechanism in place that is discussed and agreed with key stakeholders and publicly communicated. • The feedback mechanism employed is appropriate and robust enough to deal with (communicate, receive, process, respond to and learn from) complaints. • Clusters and Lead Agencies/Advisory Groups (SAG) have oversight of feedback (incl. complaints) mechanism and learn from and react to information received. Agencies, NGOs, Government, Media, etc(C) Camp Coordination / Management, C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C1.1 Displacement Site Managers, C1.2 CCCM Mechanisms, C2 Population information management, C2.1 CCCM Mechanisms, C2.2 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, C2.3 Service Provision, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.1 Displacement Site Managers, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C3.4 Service Provision - Protection, C3.5 Service Provision - Food and Nutrition, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, C3.7 Protection, C3.8 Access and Movement, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, C3.10 Service Provision - Health, C3.11 Service Provision - Shelter, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, C4.1 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, (E) Education, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E1.1 Equal Access, E1.2 Facilities and services, E1.3 Protection and Well-being, E2 Teaching and Learning, E2.1 Curricula, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, E3.1 Law and Policy Formulation, E3.2 Recruitment and Selection, E3.3 Supervision, E4 Educational Policy, E4.1 Law and Policy Formulation, (F) Food Security, F1 Food Assistance, F1.1 Cash Transfer, F1.2 Voucher Transfer, F1.3 In-kind Transfer, F1.4 Livelihood Recovery, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F2.1 Cash Transfer, F2.2 Voucher Transfer, F2.3 In-kind Transfer, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F6.1 Food Availability and Agriculture, F6.2 Livestock, F7 Utilization, F8 Agriculture and Livestock, (H) Health, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H3 Communicable diseases, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H4.1 STI & HIV, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H4.3 Sexual violence, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, H6 Environmental Health, (L) Logistics, L1 Volume, L2 Weight, (N) Nutrition, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N1.1 SAM, N1.2 MAM, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, (P) Protection, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children, PC8 Justice for Children, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG2 Develop/apply SOPs context specific, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PG4 Advocacy, awareness, education with affected populations, local authorities, international community, PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, PG6 Prevention Programming, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, PL1 HLP Documentation, PL2 Access to Land, PL3 HLP Disputes, PL4 Security of tenure for informal rights holders or vulnerable groups, P4 (PM) Mine Action, PM1 Clearance of Mines and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW), PM2 Mine and ERW risk education, PM3 Stockpile destruction, PM4 Victim Assistance, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, S1 Shelter, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, (T) Emergency Telecommunications, T1 ICT Performance, T2 ETC Coordination, (W) Water Sanitation Hygiene, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W2 Water Supply, W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality, W2.3 Water Facilities, W3 Excreta Disposal, W3.1 Environment, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation
Food Security;Health;Logistics;Protection;Nutrition;Water Sanitation Hygiene;Camp Coordination / Management;Education;Emergency Shelter and NFI;Emergency Telecommunications;Early RecoveryAAP-2Sharing InformationNumber of information products distributed to the affected population through a variety of mechanisms on humanitarian program planning, functioning and progressPeople have a right to accurate and updated information about actions taken on their behalf. Information can reduce anxiety and is an essential foundation of community responsibility and ownership. At a minimum, clusters and agencies should provide a description of the cluster's role and responsibilities, agency’s mandate and project(s), the population’s entitlements and rights, and when and where to access assistance (see HAP’s ‘sharing information’ benchmark). (Sphere Core Standard 1, Guidance Note 4) Possible examples:CommunityNumberN/A# of information messages deliveredYesProcessYesHAP Benchmark 3 on Sharing information, Sphere Core Standard 1: People-centered humanitarian responseAll PhasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Common ways of sharing information include noticeboards, public meetings, schools, newspapers, SMS 'blasts', FAQ flyers or radio and TV broadcasts. The information should demonstrate considered understanding of people’s situations and be conveyed in local language(s), using a variety of adapted media so that it is accessible to all those concerned. For example, use spoken communications or pictures for children and adults who cannot read, use uncomplicated language (i.e. understandable to local 12-year-old) and employ a large typeface when printing information for people with visual impairments. Manage meetings so that older people or those with hearing difficulties can hear. Sex, age, ability or other relevant diversity must be considered when preparing information products as is important in order to understand who is able to access information.• Information about an organisation’s or cluster’s mission, values, legal status and contact details. • Information about projects, plans and activities (in particular beneficiary selection criteria and relevant financial information). • Regular reports of actual performance in relation to previously agreed goals. • Specific details for making comments, suggestions or complaints about the cluster or agency’s activities (preferably a named member of staff). Agencies, NGOs, Government(C) Camp Coordination / Management, C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C1.1 Displacement Site Managers, C1.2 CCCM Mechanisms, C2 Population information management, C2.1 CCCM Mechanisms, C2.2 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, C2.3 Service Provision, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.1 Displacement Site Managers, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C3.4 Service Provision - Protection, C3.5 Service Provision - Food and Nutrition, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, C3.7 Protection, C3.8 Access and Movement, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, C3.10 Service Provision - Health, C3.11 Service Provision - Shelter, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, C4.1 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, (E) Education, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E1.1 Equal Access, E1.2 Facilities and services, E1.3 Protection and Well-being, E2 Teaching and Learning, E2.1 Curricula, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, E3.1 Law and Policy Formulation, E3.2 Recruitment and Selection, E3.3 Supervision, E4 Educational Policy, E4.1 Law and Policy Formulation, (F) Food Security, F1 Food Assistance, F1.1 Cash Transfer, F1.2 Voucher Transfer, F1.3 In-kind Transfer, F1.4 Livelihood Recovery, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F2.1 Cash Transfer, F2.2 Voucher Transfer, F2.3 In-kind Transfer, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F6.1 Food Availability and Agriculture, F6.2 Livestock, F7 Utilization, F8 Agriculture and Livestock, (H) Health, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H3 Communicable diseases, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H4.1 STI & HIV, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H4.3 Sexual violence, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, H6 Environmental Health, (L) Logistics, L1 Volume, L2 Weight, (N) Nutrition, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N1.1 SAM, N1.2 MAM, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, (P) Protection, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children, PC8 Justice for Children, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG2 Develop/apply SOPs context specific, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PG4 Advocacy, awareness, education with affected populations, local authorities, international community, PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, PG6 Prevention Programming, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, PL1 HLP Documentation, PL2 Access to Land, PL3 HLP Disputes, PL4 Security of tenure for informal rights holders or vulnerable groups, P4 (PM) Mine Action, PM1 Clearance of Mines and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW), PM2 Mine and ERW risk education, PM3 Stockpile destruction, PM4 Victim Assistance, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, S1 Shelter, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, (T) Emergency Telecommunications, T1 ICT Performance, T2 ETC Coordination, (W) Water Sanitation Hygiene, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W2 Water Supply, W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality, W2.3 Water Facilities, W3 Excreta Disposal, W3.1 Environment, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation
Food Security;Health;Logistics;Protection;Nutrition;Water Sanitation Hygiene;Camp Coordination / Management;Education;Emergency Shelter and NFI;Emergency Telecommunications;Early RecoveryAAP-3ParticipationNumber of persons consulted (disaggregated by sex/age) before designing a program/project [alternatively: while implementing the program/project] Participation in design of assessments, programmes, evaluations etc, means that a selected segment(s) of the affected populaiton have a direct influence on decision making.  Measures should be taken to ensure the participation of members of all groups of affected people – young and old, men and women. Special efforts should be made to include people who are not well represented, are marginalised (e.g. by ethnicity or religion) or otherwise ‘invisible’ (e.g. housebound or in an institution).InstitutionNumberN/Anumber of persons consultedYesProcessYesHAP Benchmark 4 on Participation, Sphere Core Standard 1: People-centered humanitarian response, The Good Enough Guide - Tool 3: How to involve people throughout the projectAll PhasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Understanding and addressing the barriers to participation faced by different people is critical to balanced participation. How a cluster or organisation enables key stakeholders to play an active role in the decision-making processes that affect them. It is unrealistic to expect an organisation to engage with all stakeholders over all decisions all of the time. Therefore the organisation must have clear guidelines (and practices) enabling it to prioritize stakeholders appropriately and to be responsive to the differences in power between them. Mechanisms need to be in place to ensure that the most marginalized and affected are represented and have influence. Participation here also encompasses the processes through which an organisation or cluster monitors and reviews its progress and results against goals and objectives; feeds learning back into the organisation on an on-going basis; and reports on the results of the process. To increase accountability to stakeholders, goals and objectives must be also designed in consultation with those stakeholders. A well known example of participation in developing indicators is the WASH indicator developed by a community which was - "# of hours girls spend in school" - highlighting the importance of education to the community, and also that improved water access had improved education possibilities. So the indicator has a measurement of impact built into it, the improved water access as an outcome can be assumed.• Organisations document how it speaks with a balanced cross-section of representatives from the affected communities. • Agency has a verifiable record of how communities (or their representatives) are demonstrably involved and influential in decision-making, implementation and judgement of impact throughout the lifetime of a project. • Agency has mechanisms in place to monitor and evaluate outcomes and impact and these are reported against (incl. to affected communities). • Cluster has a verifiable record of how it identified interest groups in the affected communities, and the power relationships that exist. Agencies, NGOs, Government(C) Camp Coordination / Management, C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C1.1 Displacement Site Managers, C1.2 CCCM Mechanisms, C2 Population information management, C2.1 CCCM Mechanisms, C2.2 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, C2.3 Service Provision, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.1 Displacement Site Managers, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C3.4 Service Provision - Protection, C3.5 Service Provision - Food and Nutrition, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, C3.7 Protection, C3.8 Access and Movement, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, C3.10 Service Provision - Health, C3.11 Service Provision - Shelter, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, C4.1 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, (E) Education, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E1.1 Equal Access, E1.2 Facilities and services, E1.3 Protection and Well-being, E2 Teaching and Learning, E2.1 Curricula, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, E3.1 Law and Policy Formulation, E3.2 Recruitment and Selection, E3.3 Supervision, E4 Educational Policy, E4.1 Law and Policy Formulation, (F) Food Security, F1 Food Assistance, F1.1 Cash Transfer, F1.2 Voucher Transfer, F1.3 In-kind Transfer, F1.4 Livelihood Recovery, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F2.1 Cash Transfer, F2.2 Voucher Transfer, F2.3 In-kind Transfer, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F6.1 Food Availability and Agriculture, F6.2 Livestock, F7 Utilization, F8 Agriculture and Livestock, (H) Health, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H3 Communicable diseases, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H4.1 STI & HIV, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H4.3 Sexual violence, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, H6 Environmental Health, (L) Logistics, L1 Volume, L2 Weight, (N) Nutrition, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N1.1 SAM, N1.2 MAM, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, (P) Protection, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children, PC8 Justice for Children, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG2 Develop/apply SOPs context specific, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PG4 Advocacy, awareness, education with affected populations, local authorities, international community, PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, PG6 Prevention Programming, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, PL1 HLP Documentation, PL2 Access to Land, PL3 HLP Disputes, PL4 Security of tenure for informal rights holders or vulnerable groups, P4 (PM) Mine Action, PM1 Clearance of Mines and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW), PM2 Mine and ERW risk education, PM3 Stockpile destruction, PM4 Victim Assistance, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, S1 Shelter, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, (T) Emergency Telecommunications, T1 ICT Performance, T2 ETC Coordination, (W) Water Sanitation Hygiene, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W2 Water Supply, W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality, W2.3 Water Facilities, W3 Excreta Disposal, W3.1 Environment, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation
Food SecurityF-1F3 Food AccessChange in food consumption patternsCan be measured by several indicatos like Food Consumption Score (FCS) And Household dietary diveristy score (HDDS). Current compared to pre-crisis. Frequency of meals, dietary diversity, increase/ decrease of certain food items. HouseholdHouseholdGeography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Context specific (HH, Community, Individual); Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklists 1 and 2, Sphere: Food security and nutrition assessment standard 1: Food securitySignficant Change. To be compared with pre-crisis baselineAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-10F6 AvailabilityChange in availability of key commodities in marketsMeasuring the difference in availability of key commodities will indicate if markets are under stress at different periods of time in comparison to the baseline. Othernumber of food commuditiesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklists 1 and 2R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods
Food SecurityF-11F6 AvailabilityPercentage of Households by duration of staple food stockPercentage of households that have stocks of staple food to feed their family or have the capacity to access food stocks for a given duration of time. HouseholdHouseholdsPending Food Cluster review in 2013.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Geography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklists 1 and 2n/aAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.(R) Early Recovery
Food SecurityF-12F6.1 Food Availability and AgricultureChange in production compared to previous year’s harvest by commodityComparing the last years' (normal production) with the post crisis crop production which is also an indicator that can give information on household access to income OtherPending Food Cluster review in 2013. Pending Food Cluster review in 2013. Geography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities) Baseline, OutcomeYesSignificant Change. To be compared with pre-crisis baseline Appropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergency Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Pending Food Cluster review in 2013. Pending Food Cluster review in 2013. (R) Early Recovery
Food SecurityF-13F6 AvailabilityPercentage of Households/ communities unable to plant for next seasonShare of households that are unable to restart their agricultural activities in the upcoming cropping season. To be able to farm, HHs need access to arable land, seeds, tools and other agricultural inputs. Depending on the type of crisis, one or more of these can become unavailable. Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Geography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesn/aAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4This indicator is more precise measured as % of HH, however if this information is not available particularly in early phases of the emergency then % of communities can be used as a proxy.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods
Food SecurityF-14F6 AvailabilityChange in herd sizesReporting on the percentage of change to overall herd sizes (households that either lost animals because of the crisis or had to sell or slaughter their animals as an emergency measure). HouseholdPending Food Cluster review in 2013.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Geography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, LEGS: Veterinary Support Standard 1: Assessment and planningn/aAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4This indicator is more precise measured as % of HH, however if this information is not available particularly in early phases of the emergency then % of communities can be used as a proxy.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.
Food SecurityF-15F6 AvailabilityNumber of reported animal disease outbreaksNumber of animal disease outbreaks in a community or in any given geographical area. Number (animals)Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Geography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, LEGS: Provision of Water Standard 1: Assessment and planning, LEGS: Veterinary Support Standard 1: Assessment and planningn/aAppropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergency Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Need to define which HHs to be included in the denominatorPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.H6 Environmental Health
Food SecurityF-16F6 AvailabilityPercentage of Households with suitable daily water and fodder consumption for livestockPercentage of households that have enough suitable water and fodder available for their animals. In many contexts in may be relevant to collect the data by community. HouseholdsPending Food Cluster review in 2013.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Geography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, LEGS: Ensuring Feed Supplies Standard 1: Assessment and planning, LEGS: Provision of Water Standard 1: Assessment and planningn/aAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Need to define which HHs to be included in the denominatorPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality
Food SecurityF-17F7 UtilizationPercentage of individuals having daily access to an appropriate amount of safe waterPercentage of individuals/HHs that have daily access to an appropriate quantity  (a minimum of 15 litres per person per day of water) and quality of water, coming from an improved water source. IndividualLEGS: Water Points Standard 1: Location of water points, LEGS: Water Point Standard 2: Water point rehabilitation and establishment, LEGS: Water Standard 1: Assessment and planning, Sphere: Water supply standard 1: Access and water quantity, Sphere: Water supply standard 2: Water qualityW2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality
Food SecurityF-18F7 UtilizationPercentage of HHs with capacity to prepare food safelyproportion of households with capacity to prepare food safely (fuel, water, cooking utensils, food) Households Sphere: Food security - food transfers standard 6: Food useH6 Environmental Health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, W1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices
Food SecurityF-19F7 UtilizationPercentage of households that have changed intra-household food distributionAssessing the impact of the crisis on food distribution patterns inside the HHs. The change can occur in several ways and have several degrees of severity: i.e. adults restrict consumption for children to eat, women do not eat to give food only to men (as they work) etc. HouseholdsPending Food Cluster review in 2013.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Geography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, Sphere: Food security - livelihoods standard 2: Income and employment (Key indicator 3 and Guidance Note 8)n/aAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyn/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding
Food SecurityF-2F3 Food AccessChange in food sourceChange in % share of sources for obtaining food compared to baseline, which could include food purchase, food production, borrowed food, food aid, gifts, barter or wild foods. HouseholdsHouseholdGeography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2Signficant Change. To be compared with pre-crisis baselineAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.
Food SecurityF-3F3 Food Access% change in key food & non-food commodity pricesComparison between pre-crisis and actual prices of the main food and non-food commodities in the market. OtherPricesNoLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, Sphere: Food security - cash and voucher transfers standard 1: Access to available goods and services, Sphere: Food security chapter, Annex 1: Food Security and livelihoods assessment checklists (baseline)R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, W1.1 Hygiene items, W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-4F3 Food AccessCoping StrategiesCan be measured by several indicatos like the reduced Coping Strategy Index, the Household Hunger Scale or similar hunger experience indicator. Also the livelihood component can be included. HouseholdHouseholdLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, Sphere: Food security and nutrition assessment standard 1: Food security (Guidance note 8 on coping strategies), Sphere: Food security chapter, Annex 1: Food Security and livelihoods assessment checklists (baseline), Sphere: Food security - livelihoods standards, Sphere: Food security standard 1: General food security (Guidance Note 3 on Risks associated with coping strategies)P5 Vulnerability, S3.2 Assistance, W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-5F3 Food AccessChange in main source of incomethe changes occurred to the income derived from any given sources. It is imperative to have pre-crisis information to be able to value it. Example of sources of income can include crop production, wage labour, trading, livestock, fishery, exploitation of natural resources, salary and remittances. HouseholdHouseholdGeography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, Sphere: Food security chapter, Annex 1: Food Security and livelihoods assessment checklists (baseline), Sphere: Food security - livelihoods standardsSignficant Change. To be compared with pre-crisis baselineAppropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergency Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Specify what is intended by staple food; levels / threshold will vary according to context.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy, W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-6F3 Food AccessChange in ability to meet survival and livelihoods protection thresholdsThis indicator uses the HEA approach to determine households’ survival and livelihoods protection thresholds and with shocks, their ability to meet their needs, using their coping strategies, as per the baseline.HouseholdsHouseholdLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2For Standards, also see: Sphere: Food security and nutrition chapter + assessment annexesP5 Vulnerability, W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-7F3 Food AccessExpenditure patternsChange in expenditure patterns in % terms, especially on items such as food, health, education, housing, transportation, clothing fuel and water among others.. HouseholdHouseholdGeography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, Sphere: Food security - cash and voucher transfers standard 1: Access to available goods and servicesSignficant Change. To be compared with pre-crisis baselineAppropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergency Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Levels / threshold will vary according to contextPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-8F3 Food Accesschange in HH ownership of productive assetsRecording of the pre- and post-crises ownership of specific assets. Assets are generally classified as productive assets (if linked to a livelihood and income generating activities) and household assets. HouseholdHouseholdsGeography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, Sphere: Food security and nutrition assessment standard 1: Food security, Sphere: Food security standard 1: General food security (Guidance Note 3 on Risks associated with coping strategies)n/aAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.(R) Early Recovery
Food SecurityF-9F3 Food AccessChange in access to functioning marketsA market is here understood as a place where people are able to buy and sell products, including food, agricultural inputs and other consumption goods. Functioning markets are characterised by the existence of competition (between sellers as well as buyers), and availability of information. VillageGeography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2n/aAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-Output-1F1 Food AssistanceNumber of beneficiaries receiving food, non-food items, cash transfers and vouchers as % of plannedIndividualGeography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)OutputYesLEGS: Core Standard 6: Monitoring, Evaluation and Livelihoods Impact, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chaptern/aAppropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergency Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.W1.1 Hygiene items, W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-Output-10F8 Agriculture and LivestockQuantity of input items distributed, as % of plannedOtherAgricultural inputs LEGS: Core Standard 6: Monitoring, Evaluation and Livelihoods Impact, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chapter
Food SecurityF-Output-11F1 Food AssistanceNumber of people trained as % of planned (e.g. best nutrition practice or land conservation etc.)IndividualTotal planned peopleActual number of peopleLEGS: Core Standard 6: Monitoring, Evaluation and Livelihoods ImpactR3 Capacity Building
Food SecurityF-Output-12F1 Food AssistanceNumber of market system actors involved in emergency responseIndividualTraders, retailes, or other
Food SecurityF-Output-13F1 Food AssistanceNumber of institutional sites assisted (e.g. schools, health centres), as % of plannedFacilitySchool, health centres or otherE1 Access and Learning Environment, R4 Governance, W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-Output-2F1 Food AssistanceQuantity of food/value of cash/voucher received by beneficiary HH (and proportion in relation to food basket)This indicator should express the percentage of the food needs that are covered by the ration distributed Othern/aTotal planned food basket per HHActual received by HHGeography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)OutputYesLEGS: Core Standard 6: Monitoring, Evaluation and Livelihoods Impactn/aAppropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergency Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods
Food SecurityF-Output-3F1 Food AssistanceQuantity of food assistance distributed, as % of plannedOtherTons, or value of cash or vouchersTotal quantity plannedActual distributed
Food SecurityF-Output-4F1 Food AssistanceTotal value of cash or vouchers for food and basic needs distributed, as % of plannedOtherValue of cahs and/or vouchersTotal quantity plannedActual distributedLEGS: Core Standard 6: Monitoring, Evaluation and Livelihoods ImpactR1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods
Food SecurityF-Output-5F1 Food AssistanceFrequency of food/cash assistance to beneficiary HH (months)OtherNumber of months
Food SecurityF-Output-6F1.4 Livelihood RecoveryTotal value of cash and vouchers for livelihood recovery distributed to targeted beneficiaries as % of plannedother Value of cash and/or vouchersLEGS: Core Standard 6: Monitoring, Evaluation and Livelihoods ImpactR1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods
Food SecurityF-Output-7F1 Food AssistanceNumber of assets built, restored or maintained to targeted beneficiaries, by type and unit of measure (e.g. hectares of land where conservation activities were implemented, length and type of irrigation systems restored, hectares recovered for farming)Title: Number of assets built, restored or maintained to targeted beneficiaries, by type and unit of measure (e.g. hectares of land where conservation activities were implemented, length and type of irrigation systems restored, hectares recovered for farming) as % of planned OtherNumber of assets LEGS: Core Standard 6: Monitoring, Evaluation and Livelihoods ImpactR4 Governance, W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-Output-8F8 Agriculture and LivestockNumber of beneficiaries receiving agricultural inputs as % of planned beneficiariesIncluding animals IndividualNumberPending Food Cluster review in 2013.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Geography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)OutputYesLEGS: Core Standard 6: Monitoring, Evaluation and Livelihoods Impactn/aAppropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergency Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.
Food SecurityF-Output-9F8 Agriculture and LivestockGermination rates/harvest quantities as % of plannedPending Food Cluster review in 2013. Othern/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Geography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)OutputYesn/aAppropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergency Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods