Global ClustersCodeSub-domainTitleDescriptionUnit of MeasurementUnit DescriptionDenominatorNumeratorDisaggregationKey indicatorTypesResponse MonitoringStandardsThresholdGuidance on phasesPhase applicabilityGeneral guidanceGuidance for pre-crisis/baselineCommentsData SourcesSector cross-tagging
Food Security;Health;Logistics;Protection;Nutrition;Water Sanitation Hygiene;Camp Coordination / Management;Education;Emergency Shelter and NFI;Emergency Telecommunications;Early RecoveryAAP-1Feedback MechanismsNumber of feedback received (including complaints) which have been acted uponFeedback mechanisms provide a means for all those affected to comment on and thus indirectly influence programme planning and implementation (see HAP’s ‘participation’ benchmark). They include focus group discussions, surveys, interviews and meetings on ‘lessons learnt’ with a representative sample of all the affected population (see ECB’s Good Enough Guide for tools and Guidance notes 3–4). The findings and the agency’s actions in response to feedback should be systematically shared with the affected population.InstitutionNumberN/ANumber of organisations with formal feedback mechanisms in placeYesProcessYesHAP Benchmark 3 on Sharing information, Sphere Core Standard 1: People-centered humanitarian response, The Good Enough Guide - Section 5: Use feedback to improve project impactAll PhasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Feedback mechanisms can take many forms. Whatever the most appropriate channels are should be used; radio talk back programmes, online surveys, sms and twitter inputs, regularised focus group discussions with selected members of the population, suggestions and complaints boxes, designation of sector or camp committees to feedback on specific topics, prioritisation assessments, through dedicated community engagement staff among many other possibilities. Sex, age, ability or other relevant diversity disaggregation of the feedback received is important in order to understand who is most at risk and to take responsible actions. It is important to remember that feedback needs to be collected, digested and acted upon, and then the results of those actions relayed to the population, then another round of feedback can begin on the changed situation. This is the 'feedback loop' - an ongoing dialogue between the humanitarian community and the affected population. Remember that much of this is already happening - through food monitors, community outreach programmes, ongoing assessments - the important thing is to keep the feedback loop continuing.• Clusters and partners have a formal, appropriate feedback mechanism in place that is discussed and agreed with key stakeholders and publicly communicated. • The feedback mechanism employed is appropriate and robust enough to deal with (communicate, receive, process, respond to and learn from) complaints. • Clusters and Lead Agencies/Advisory Groups (SAG) have oversight of feedback (incl. complaints) mechanism and learn from and react to information received. Agencies, NGOs, Government, Media, etc(C) Camp Coordination / Management, C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C1.1 Displacement Site Managers, C1.2 CCCM Mechanisms, C2 Population information management, C2.1 CCCM Mechanisms, C2.2 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, C2.3 Service Provision, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.1 Displacement Site Managers, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C3.4 Service Provision - Protection, C3.5 Service Provision - Food and Nutrition, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, C3.7 Protection, C3.8 Access and Movement, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, C3.10 Service Provision - Health, C3.11 Service Provision - Shelter, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, C4.1 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, (E) Education, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E1.1 Equal Access, E1.2 Facilities and services, E1.3 Protection and Well-being, E2 Teaching and Learning, E2.1 Curricula, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, E3.1 Law and Policy Formulation, E3.2 Recruitment and Selection, E3.3 Supervision, E4 Educational Policy, E4.1 Law and Policy Formulation, (F) Food Security, F1 Food Assistance, F1.1 Cash Transfer, F1.2 Voucher Transfer, F1.3 In-kind Transfer, F1.4 Livelihood Recovery, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F2.1 Cash Transfer, F2.2 Voucher Transfer, F2.3 In-kind Transfer, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F6.1 Food Availability and Agriculture, F6.2 Livestock, F7 Utilization, F8 Agriculture and Livestock, (H) Health, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H3 Communicable diseases, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H4.1 STI & HIV, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H4.3 Sexual violence, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, H6 Environmental Health, (L) Logistics, L1 Volume, L2 Weight, (N) Nutrition, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N1.1 SAM, N1.2 MAM, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, (P) Protection, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children, PC8 Justice for Children, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG2 Develop/apply SOPs context specific, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PG4 Advocacy, awareness, education with affected populations, local authorities, international community, PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, PG6 Prevention Programming, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, PL1 HLP Documentation, PL2 Access to Land, PL3 HLP Disputes, PL4 Security of tenure for informal rights holders or vulnerable groups, P4 (PM) Mine Action, PM1 Clearance of Mines and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW), PM2 Mine and ERW risk education, PM3 Stockpile destruction, PM4 Victim Assistance, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, S1 Shelter, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, (T) Emergency Telecommunications, T1 ICT Performance, T2 ETC Coordination, (W) Water Sanitation Hygiene, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W2 Water Supply, W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality, W2.3 Water Facilities, W3 Excreta Disposal, W3.1 Environment, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation
Food Security;Health;Logistics;Protection;Nutrition;Water Sanitation Hygiene;Camp Coordination / Management;Education;Emergency Shelter and NFI;Emergency Telecommunications;Early RecoveryAAP-2Sharing InformationNumber of information products distributed to the affected population through a variety of mechanisms on humanitarian program planning, functioning and progressPeople have a right to accurate and updated information about actions taken on their behalf. Information can reduce anxiety and is an essential foundation of community responsibility and ownership. At a minimum, clusters and agencies should provide a description of the cluster's role and responsibilities, agency’s mandate and project(s), the population’s entitlements and rights, and when and where to access assistance (see HAP’s ‘sharing information’ benchmark). (Sphere Core Standard 1, Guidance Note 4) Possible examples:CommunityNumberN/A# of information messages deliveredYesProcessYesHAP Benchmark 3 on Sharing information, Sphere Core Standard 1: People-centered humanitarian responseAll PhasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Common ways of sharing information include noticeboards, public meetings, schools, newspapers, SMS 'blasts', FAQ flyers or radio and TV broadcasts. The information should demonstrate considered understanding of people’s situations and be conveyed in local language(s), using a variety of adapted media so that it is accessible to all those concerned. For example, use spoken communications or pictures for children and adults who cannot read, use uncomplicated language (i.e. understandable to local 12-year-old) and employ a large typeface when printing information for people with visual impairments. Manage meetings so that older people or those with hearing difficulties can hear. Sex, age, ability or other relevant diversity must be considered when preparing information products as is important in order to understand who is able to access information.• Information about an organisation’s or cluster’s mission, values, legal status and contact details. • Information about projects, plans and activities (in particular beneficiary selection criteria and relevant financial information). • Regular reports of actual performance in relation to previously agreed goals. • Specific details for making comments, suggestions or complaints about the cluster or agency’s activities (preferably a named member of staff). Agencies, NGOs, Government(C) Camp Coordination / Management, C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C1.1 Displacement Site Managers, C1.2 CCCM Mechanisms, C2 Population information management, C2.1 CCCM Mechanisms, C2.2 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, C2.3 Service Provision, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.1 Displacement Site Managers, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C3.4 Service Provision - Protection, C3.5 Service Provision - Food and Nutrition, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, C3.7 Protection, C3.8 Access and Movement, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, C3.10 Service Provision - Health, C3.11 Service Provision - Shelter, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, C4.1 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, (E) Education, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E1.1 Equal Access, E1.2 Facilities and services, E1.3 Protection and Well-being, E2 Teaching and Learning, E2.1 Curricula, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, E3.1 Law and Policy Formulation, E3.2 Recruitment and Selection, E3.3 Supervision, E4 Educational Policy, E4.1 Law and Policy Formulation, (F) Food Security, F1 Food Assistance, F1.1 Cash Transfer, F1.2 Voucher Transfer, F1.3 In-kind Transfer, F1.4 Livelihood Recovery, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F2.1 Cash Transfer, F2.2 Voucher Transfer, F2.3 In-kind Transfer, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F6.1 Food Availability and Agriculture, F6.2 Livestock, F7 Utilization, F8 Agriculture and Livestock, (H) Health, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H3 Communicable diseases, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H4.1 STI & HIV, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H4.3 Sexual violence, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, H6 Environmental Health, (L) Logistics, L1 Volume, L2 Weight, (N) Nutrition, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N1.1 SAM, N1.2 MAM, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, (P) Protection, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children, PC8 Justice for Children, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG2 Develop/apply SOPs context specific, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PG4 Advocacy, awareness, education with affected populations, local authorities, international community, PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, PG6 Prevention Programming, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, PL1 HLP Documentation, PL2 Access to Land, PL3 HLP Disputes, PL4 Security of tenure for informal rights holders or vulnerable groups, P4 (PM) Mine Action, PM1 Clearance of Mines and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW), PM2 Mine and ERW risk education, PM3 Stockpile destruction, PM4 Victim Assistance, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, S1 Shelter, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, (T) Emergency Telecommunications, T1 ICT Performance, T2 ETC Coordination, (W) Water Sanitation Hygiene, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W2 Water Supply, W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality, W2.3 Water Facilities, W3 Excreta Disposal, W3.1 Environment, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation
Food Security;Health;Logistics;Protection;Nutrition;Water Sanitation Hygiene;Camp Coordination / Management;Education;Emergency Shelter and NFI;Emergency Telecommunications;Early RecoveryAAP-3ParticipationNumber of persons consulted (disaggregated by sex/age) before designing a program/project [alternatively: while implementing the program/project] Participation in design of assessments, programmes, evaluations etc, means that a selected segment(s) of the affected populaiton have a direct influence on decision making.  Measures should be taken to ensure the participation of members of all groups of affected people – young and old, men and women. Special efforts should be made to include people who are not well represented, are marginalised (e.g. by ethnicity or religion) or otherwise ‘invisible’ (e.g. housebound or in an institution).InstitutionNumberN/Anumber of persons consultedYesProcessYesHAP Benchmark 4 on Participation, Sphere Core Standard 1: People-centered humanitarian response, The Good Enough Guide - Tool 3: How to involve people throughout the projectAll PhasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Understanding and addressing the barriers to participation faced by different people is critical to balanced participation. How a cluster or organisation enables key stakeholders to play an active role in the decision-making processes that affect them. It is unrealistic to expect an organisation to engage with all stakeholders over all decisions all of the time. Therefore the organisation must have clear guidelines (and practices) enabling it to prioritize stakeholders appropriately and to be responsive to the differences in power between them. Mechanisms need to be in place to ensure that the most marginalized and affected are represented and have influence. Participation here also encompasses the processes through which an organisation or cluster monitors and reviews its progress and results against goals and objectives; feeds learning back into the organisation on an on-going basis; and reports on the results of the process. To increase accountability to stakeholders, goals and objectives must be also designed in consultation with those stakeholders. A well known example of participation in developing indicators is the WASH indicator developed by a community which was - "# of hours girls spend in school" - highlighting the importance of education to the community, and also that improved water access had improved education possibilities. So the indicator has a measurement of impact built into it, the improved water access as an outcome can be assumed.• Organisations document how it speaks with a balanced cross-section of representatives from the affected communities. • Agency has a verifiable record of how communities (or their representatives) are demonstrably involved and influential in decision-making, implementation and judgement of impact throughout the lifetime of a project. • Agency has mechanisms in place to monitor and evaluate outcomes and impact and these are reported against (incl. to affected communities). • Cluster has a verifiable record of how it identified interest groups in the affected communities, and the power relationships that exist. Agencies, NGOs, Government(C) Camp Coordination / Management, C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C1.1 Displacement Site Managers, C1.2 CCCM Mechanisms, C2 Population information management, C2.1 CCCM Mechanisms, C2.2 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, C2.3 Service Provision, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.1 Displacement Site Managers, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C3.4 Service Provision - Protection, C3.5 Service Provision - Food and Nutrition, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, C3.7 Protection, C3.8 Access and Movement, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, C3.10 Service Provision - Health, C3.11 Service Provision - Shelter, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, C4.1 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, (E) Education, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E1.1 Equal Access, E1.2 Facilities and services, E1.3 Protection and Well-being, E2 Teaching and Learning, E2.1 Curricula, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, E3.1 Law and Policy Formulation, E3.2 Recruitment and Selection, E3.3 Supervision, E4 Educational Policy, E4.1 Law and Policy Formulation, (F) Food Security, F1 Food Assistance, F1.1 Cash Transfer, F1.2 Voucher Transfer, F1.3 In-kind Transfer, F1.4 Livelihood Recovery, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F2.1 Cash Transfer, F2.2 Voucher Transfer, F2.3 In-kind Transfer, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F6.1 Food Availability and Agriculture, F6.2 Livestock, F7 Utilization, F8 Agriculture and Livestock, (H) Health, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H3 Communicable diseases, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H4.1 STI & HIV, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H4.3 Sexual violence, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, H6 Environmental Health, (L) Logistics, L1 Volume, L2 Weight, (N) Nutrition, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N1.1 SAM, N1.2 MAM, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, (P) Protection, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children, PC8 Justice for Children, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG2 Develop/apply SOPs context specific, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PG4 Advocacy, awareness, education with affected populations, local authorities, international community, PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, PG6 Prevention Programming, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, PL1 HLP Documentation, PL2 Access to Land, PL3 HLP Disputes, PL4 Security of tenure for informal rights holders or vulnerable groups, P4 (PM) Mine Action, PM1 Clearance of Mines and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW), PM2 Mine and ERW risk education, PM3 Stockpile destruction, PM4 Victim Assistance, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, S1 Shelter, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, (T) Emergency Telecommunications, T1 ICT Performance, T2 ETC Coordination, (W) Water Sanitation Hygiene, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W2 Water Supply, W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality, W2.3 Water Facilities, W3 Excreta Disposal, W3.1 Environment, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-01C2 Population information managementTotal estimated number displaced people living in displacement sites (this includes camps, spontaneous sites and collective centres)The number of people in need of different types of assistance will need to be defined at the national and local level. This data is already recorded as a COD and will feed into other indicators. PopulationEstimationn/aTotal estimated number displaced people living in displacement sites (this includes camps, spontaneous sites and collective centres)Displacement site; type of displacement site (camps, spontaneous sites and collective centres) ; sex, age, disability, and other diversity concernsYesBaselineNon/aAs per Indicator description the quality of data collection sources will improve over the duration of the emergency with population profiling early in the emergency and registration in later phases.Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aThis data is already recorded and available as a CODCODC2 Population information management, E1.1 Equal Access, F1 Food Assistance, F1.4 Livelihood Recovery, F8 Agriculture and Livestock, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, (N) Nutrition, P6 Displacement and Return, (R) Early Recovery, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, W7 Aggravating Factors
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-02C2 Population information managementNumber of displacement sitesThis data is already recorded and available as a FOD and will feed into other indicators. Displacement sitesNumber and Percentage (spontaneous)Overall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of spontaneous displacement sitesDisplacement site; Type of displacement site (camps, spontaneous sites and collective centres)YesBaselineNoNew L3 Emergency -Phase 1-4Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4This data is already recorded and available as a FODFODC2 Population information management, E1.1 Equal Access, F1 Food Assistance, F1.4 Livelihood Recovery, F8 Agriculture and Livestock, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, (N) Nutrition, P6 Displacement and Return, (R) Early Recovery, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, W7 Aggravating Factors
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-03C2 Population information managementNumber and percentage of IDP population living in displacement sites that have been registered at the household levelThis can express a need in terms of people requiring registration, or an output in terms of what partners have done to register displaced people by sex and age. PopulationNumber and Percentage (IDP)Total estimated number displaced people living in displacement sites (this includes camps, spontaneous sites and collective centres)Number of people registered by household registration living in displacement sitesDisplacement site; sex, age, disability, and other diversity concernsYesBaselineYesCamp Management Toolkit (Chapters 5, 9)New L3 Emergency - Phases 3-4Phase 3, Phase 4DTM reports, FOCUSC2 Population information management, (E) Education, F1 Food Assistance, F1.4 Livelihood Recovery, F8 Agriculture and Livestock, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, (N) Nutrition, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, W7 Aggravating Factors
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-04C2 Population information managementNumber and percentage of IDP populations living in displacement sites in urban areas.This indicator is concerned with displacement sites in urban areas with sex and age disaggregation. The definition of an urban area should be decided at national level. PopulationNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated in urban areasNumber of displaced people living in displacement sites in urban areasDisplacement site; site type; population size. If displacement sites vary significantly by size, it may be necessary to disaggregate by population size or displacement site type (eg collective centre/ spontaneous site) ; sex, age, disability, and other diversity concernsNoBaselineNoAs per Indicator description the quality of data collection sources will improve over the duration of the emergency with population profiling early in the emergency and registration in later phases.Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4C2 Population information management, E1.1 Equal Access, F1 Food Assistance, F1.4 Livelihood Recovery, F8 Agriculture and Livestock, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, (N) Nutrition, P6 Displacement and Return, (R) Early Recovery, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, W7 Aggravating Factors
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-05C2 Population information managementNumber and percentage of displacement sites in urban areas receiving urban site management services.This indicator is concerned with displacement sites in urban areas. The definition of an urban area should be decided at national level. 'Urban site management services' include CCCM mechanisms such as population statistics monitoring, self governance mechanisms, monitoring service provision, site manager. Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated in urban areasNumber of displacement sites in urban areas receiving urban site management servicesDisplacement site; site type; population size. If displacement sites vary significantly by size, it may be necessary to disaggregate by population size or displacement site type (eg collective centre/ spontaneous site); sex, age, disability, and other diversity concerns of service usersNoOutputYesNew L3 Emergency - Phase 4.Phase 4C2 Population information management, (E) Education, F1 Food Assistance, F8 Agriculture and Livestock, F1.4 Livelihood Recovery, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, (N) Nutrition, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, (R) Early Recovery, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, W7 Aggravating Factors
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-06C2 Population information managementEstimated number and percentage of displaced persons in displacement sites without documentationThis indicator is linked to the registration process when displaced people's documents can be seen Displaced personsNumber and PercentageTotal number of displaced personsNumber of displaced persons without documentationType of registration documentation; Vulnerable persons by sex and ageNoBaselineNoCamp Management Toolkit (Chapters 8, 9)New L3 Emergency - Phase 1-2Phase 1, Phase 2DTM reports, MIRA, Protection Monitoring Tool reportsC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, S2 Shelter-related NFI
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-07C2.1 CCCM MechanismsNumber and percentage of displacement sites with established CCCM mechanismsSites which have any one of the following mechanisms operational - population statistics monitoring by sex and age, women's committees, and camp committees with women representation, self governance mechanisms, monitoring service provision, site manager Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of displacement sites with established CCCM mechanismsDisplacement site; Types of mechanisms (population statistics monitoring, self governance mechanisms, monitoring service provision) ; sex, age, disability, and other diversity concernsYesOutputYesNew L3 Emergency - Phase 4; Early phases may use displacement profiling; and later phases likely to use registration. Although registration is always recommended where possible.Phase 4CCCM mechanisms could include administrative, management and/or coordination structures.CCCM Cluster MeetingsC2 Population information management, (P) Protection, S1 Shelter, S2 Shelter-related NFI, (N) Nutrition
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-08C2.1 CCCM MechanismsNumber and percentage of displacement sites conducting IDP registration activitiesRegistration activities may be at the household or individual level with sex and age disaggregation. An estimiation of the displacement site population is important for creating distibution lists, tracking population movements, monitoring site programing, case management, and ensuring accurate representation of vulnerable populations. Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber and percentage of displacement sites conducting population registrationDisplacement site; sex, age, disability, and other diversity concerns of registered IDPsNoOutputYesCamp Management Toolkit (Chapter 7)New L3 Emergency - Phase 4Phase 4De-registration/departure should be monitored but not controlled in order to adequately calculate needs within the displacement siteDTM, Site Manager RecordsC2 Population information management, (P) Protection, (R) Early Recovery
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-09C2.1 CCCM MechanismsNumber and percentage of displacement sites where de-registration/ departure is monitoredDe-registration/departure should be monitored but not controlled in order to adequately calculate needs within the displacement site and plan accordingly. Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of displacement sites where de-registration/ departure is monitoredDisplacement site; sex, age, disability, and other diversity concerns of departed IDPsNoOutputYesCamp Management Toolkit (Chapter 7)New L3 Emergency - Phase 4Phase 4De-registration/departure should be monitored but not controlled in order to adequately calculate needs within the displacement siteDTM, Site Manager RecordsC2 Population information management, (P) Protection, R4 Governance, S1 Shelter, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-10C1.2 CCCM MechanismsNumber and percentage of displacement sites that have a formal dispute resolution and/or complaint mechanism including PSEADisplacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of displacement sites with organization/ community presence with programmes in dispute resolutionsDisplacement site; organization/ community presence in dispute resolution programmes has balanced representation according to age, sex, other diversity concerns; dispute mechanism users broken down by sex, age, other diversity concernsNoOutputYesCamp Management Toolkit (Chapter 2)New L3 Emergency - Phase 4Phase 4CCCM Cluster MeetingsC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, (P) Protection, (R) Early Recovery
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-11C1.2 CCCM MechanismsNumber and percentage of displacement sites with representative governance structuresIt is important that settlement governance structures be representative of the population groups. These governance structures should be elected and should ensure representation/participation from all strata of the population (women, elderly, cultural, etc.). Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of displacement sites with represnentative governance structures (age, sex & diversity)Displacement site; Site management committee; Site management committee with minority/vulnerable group representation; governance structures should be broken down by age, sex, other diversity concernsYesOutcomeYesCamp Management Toolkit (Chapters 3, 11)New L3 Emergency -Phase 3-4Phase 3, Phase 4Evidence of activities will come from a responsible reporting party, such as the site manager or government official responsible for the site. New emergencies will not have elected committeed.DTM reports, CODs, FODs, site management reportsC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, (P) Protection, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-12C3.3 CCCM MechanismsNumber and Percentage of displacement sites with host community representation in governance structuresThis indicator may not always be relevant in all displacement situations. The site and/or protection environment may determine its appropriateness. Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of displacement sites with host community representation in governamnce structuresDisplacement site; organization/ community presence has balanced representation according to age, sex, disability, other diversity concernsNoOutputYesNew L3 Emergency -Phase 2-4 Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P5 Vulnerability, R4 Governance
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-13C2 Population information managementNumber and Percentage of displacement sites that regularly collect demographic information disaggregated by sex and age to an agreed reporting cycleDisplacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of displacement sites that regularly collect demographic information disaggrgated by sex and ageDisplacement site; age; sexYesOutputYesCamp Management Toolkit (Chapter 8)New L3 Emergency - Phase 4Phase 4Evidence of activities will come from a responsible reporting party, such as the site manager or government official responsible fo rthe site.DTM, FOCUS, PORTALC2 Population information management, E1.1 Equal Access, (F) Food Security, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, (N) Nutrition, P6 Displacement and Return, (R) Early Recovery, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, W7 Aggravating Factors
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-14C3.8 Access and MovementNumber and Percentage of displacement sites with restrictions on movement in and out of the displacement siteThis indicator monitors restrictions on movement of displaced population for various reasons. Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyPercentage of displacement sites with restrictions on movement in and out of the displacement siteDisplacement site; Type of restriction (includes accessibility, national restrictions, security). NB: Accessibility may include logistics constraints, i.e. lack of roads, floods.NoOutcomeNoCamp Management Toolkit (Chapter 8)New L3 Emergency - Phase 4Phase 4Freedom of movement means, for example, that camp residents do not need permits to come and go and are not physically confined in the camp.DTM reports, Community Meetings in displacement site, camp/site Focal PointC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, (P) Protection, S2 Shelter-related NFI
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-15C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordinationNumber and Percentage of displacement sites under threat of forced eviction.The number of displacement sites under threat from forced eviction will provide information for advocacy against these, where necessary. This indicator may not always be relevant in all displacement situations. The site and/or protection environment may determine it's appropriateness. Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageTotal number of displacement sites with threats of forced evictionNumber of displacement sites with advocacy activities against threats of forced evictionsDisplacement site,NoOutcomeNoCamp Management Toolkit (Chapters 2, 7, 8, 12)New L3 Emergency -Phase 1-4Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4DTM reports, CODs, FODs, site management reports, Protection Monitoring Tool reports, Site Manager meeting minutesC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, (P) Protection, (R) Early Recovery, S2 Shelter-related NFI, E1.1 Equal Access
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-16C3.8 Access and MovementNumber and Percentage of displacement sites with restricted humanitarian accessThis indicator monitors restrictions to humanitarian actors' access to displacement sites for various reasons but may include: insecurity, government limitations, infrastructure limitations or others. Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of displacement sites with restricted humanitarian accessDisplacement site; Type of restriction (includes accessibility, national restrictions, security). NB: Accessibility may include logistics constraints, i.e. lack of roads, floods.NoOutcomeNoNew L3 Emergency - Phase 1-4Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, (P) Protection, S2 Shelter-related NFI, F1 Food Assistance, F1.4 Livelihood Recovery, F8 Agriculture and Livestock
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-17C3.4 Service Provision - ProtectionNumber and percentage of displacement sites where residents have access to law enforcement mechanismsThis indicator covers one aspect of protection in displacement sites. Law enforcement mechanisms, such as policing, civilian security patrols, access to courts and national justice systems, codes for dispute resolution, reporting mechanisms, and referral systems, contribute to a safer site environment by reducing the risk of protection incidents and providing a means to address them when they occur. Even when law enforcement mechanisms are in place, these may not be equally accessible to all members of the displaced population.Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of displacement sites where residents have access to law enforcement mechanismsDisplacement site; law enforcement mechanism; law enforcement structure representation and users should be broken down by age, sex, disability, other diversity concernsNoOutputNoNew L3 Emergency - Phases 2-4 Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4When using this indicator the cluster should be careful to define whether this is or is not including the host population, as this may greatly affect whether needs are met.C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, (P) Protection, (R) Early Recovery
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-18C3.11 Service Provision - ShelterNumber and percentage of displacement sites where all IDPs have access to shelterThis indicator monitors whether people in a displacement site have access to shelter in each phase of an emergency. Where all IDPs do not have access to shelter, qualitative data should also be sought about who lacks access (eg. sex, age, ethnicity). Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of displacement sites where all IDPs have access to shelterDisplacement Site; shelter type; sex, age, other diversity concerns of IDPs who have access to shelterNoOutcomeYesSphere: Shelter and settlement standard 1: Strategic planningNew L3 Emergency - Phases 2-4 Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R4 Governance, S2 Shelter-related NFI, W7 Aggravating Factors
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-19C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or ShelterNumber and Percentage of displacement sites with NFI needs, in which at least one NFI distribution has taken place in the last three monthsThis indicator monitors whether people in displacement sites with NFI needs are receiving distributions. This indicator is also a component of WASH and/or Shelter service provision. Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of displacement sites with NFI needs that have received at least one NFI distributionDisplacement site; sex, age, other diversity concerns of NFI recipientsNoOutputYesCamp Management Toolkit (Chapter 14), Sphere: Non-food items standard 1New L3 Emergency - Phases 3-4Phase 3, Phase 4DTM reports, FOCUSC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H3 Communicable diseases, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H6 Environmental Health, P5 Vulnerability, S1 Shelter, W1.1 Hygiene items, W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality, W2.3 Water Facilities, W3.1 Environment, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage, E1.1 Equal Access, E1.2 Facilities and services
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-20C3.2 Service Provision - WASHNumber and percentage of displacement sites where IDP population has access to potable water supply within walking distance.This indicator monitors whether IDP populations in displacement sites have access to potable water. Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of displacement sites where IDP population has access to potable water supply within walking distance.Displacement Site; Type of service; sex, age, other diversity concerns of those who have access to potable waterNoOutcomeYesSphere: Shelter and settlement standard 2, Sphere: Water supply standard 1: Access and water quantityNew L3 Emergency -Phase 2-4 Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4When using this indicator the cluster should be careful to define whether this is or is not including the host population, as this may greatly affect whether needs are met.C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H6 Environmental Health, (N) Nutrition, P5 Vulnerability, W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality, F1 Food Assistance, F7 Utilization, E1.2 Facilities and services
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-21C3.2 Service Provision - WASHNumber and percentage of displacement sites where IDP population has access to WASH infrastructure.This indicator monitors whether IDP populations in displacement sites have access to WASH infrastructure. A displacement site must have sex separated lockable latrines, solid waste disposal, bathing faciliities, and drainage in order to answer yes to this question. Number and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of displacement sites where IDP population has access to WASH infrastructure.Displacement Site; Type of service; sex, age, other diversity concerns of those who have access to WASH infrastructureNoOutcomeYesSphere WASH chapterNew L3 Emergency -Phase 2-4 Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4When using this indicator the cluster should be careful to define whether this is or is not including the host population, as this may greatly affect whether needs are met.C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, (R) Early Recovery, W2.3 Water Facilities, W3.1 Environment, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-22C3.5 Service Provision - Food and NutritionNumber and percentage of displacement sites with food/nutrition needs where at least one food distribution has taken place within the past monthThis indicator monitors whether IDP populations in displacement sites with food needs have access to food distributions. Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of displacement sites with food/nutrition needs where at least one food distribution has taken place within the past monthDisplacement Site; Type of service; sex, age, other diversity concerns of food/nutrition recipientsNoOutputYesSphere: Food security - food transfers standard 5: Targeting and distributionNew L3 Emergency -Phase 2-4 Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4When using this indicator the cluster should be careful to define whether this is or is not including the host population, as this may greatly affect whether needs are met.C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, (N) Nutrition, P5 Vulnerability, E1.2 Facilities and services
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-23C3.10 Service Provision - HealthNumber and percentage of displacement sites that have functioning health services within walking distance that IDP populations can attendThis indicator monitors whether IDP populations in displacement sites have access to basic health services. Health services include health clinics and moblie health teams. Even if functioning, health services may not be equally accessible to all members of the displaced population (eg. because of disability, sex, and related security concerns). Qualitative data should be sought on who is able/unable to access health services. Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of displacement sites that have functioning health services within walking distance that IDP populations can attendDisplacement Site; Type of service; age, sex, other diversity concerns of those who have access to health servicesNoOutcomeYesSphere: Health systems standard 1: Health service deliveryNew L3 Emergency - Phases 3-4Phase 3, Phase 4When using this indicator the cluster should be careful to define whether this is or is not including the host population, as this may greatly affect whether needs are met.C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H3 Communicable diseases, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, H6 Environmental Health, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-24C3.6 Service Provision - EducationNumber and percentage of displacement sites that have schools within walking distance that IDP children/youth can attend.This indicator monitors whether IDP children and youth in displacement sites have access to education. Even if present, schools may not be equally accessible to all children (eg. because of disability, sex and related security concerns). Qualitative data should also be sought on who is able/unable to attend school based on sex and age. Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of displacement sites that have schools within walking distance that IDP children/youth can attend.Displacement Site; Type of educational institution ; sex, age, other diversity concerns of children who have access to schoolNoOutcomeYesINEENew L3 Emergency - Phases 3-4Phase 3, Phase 4When using this indicator the cluster should be careful to define whether this is or is not including the host population, as this may greatly affect whether needs are met.C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P1 (PC) Child Protection, (R) Early Recovery, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E1.1 Equal Access, E1.2 Facilities and services, E1.3 Protection and Well-being
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-25C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordinationNumber and Percentage of displacement sites where common services are targetted to reach vulnerable groupsCommon services can incude general distributions, food, WASH, and Education (to be define at the national/ local level). This indicator is linked to indicator 16 measuring general services reaching all populations including most vulnerable populations. Such mechanisms are put in place to ensure that general services provided reach the most vulnerable populations (minority groups, female-headed households, disabled, elderly, children). An example of common service targetting would be placing vulnerable groups, such as the elderly, at the front of distribution queues. Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of displacement sites with assistance targeting mechanisms in placeDisplacement site; Vulnerable group (disabled, elderly, singel headed household, children, etc)NoOutputYesSphere Protection Principle 2: Access to impartial assistanceNew L3 Emergency - Phase 2-4 Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Vulnerable sectors of the population include the disabled, single-headed households, UAMs, elderly, GBV, et ceteraDTM reports, FOCUS, Meetings in Camp, camp/site Focal Point, CODs, FODs, MIRA(C) Camp Coordination / Management, E1.1 Equal Access, E1.2 Facilities and services, E1.3 Protection and Well-being, F1 Food Assistance, F1.4 Livelihood Recovery, F8 Agriculture and Livestock, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, (N) Nutrition, (R) Early Recovery, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, W7 Aggravating Factors, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-26C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordinationNumber and Percentage of displacement sites where specific services exist for vulnerable groupsSpecific services are services required by vulnerable groups; Examples in this category include: support for survivors of sexual and gender based violence (SGBV), psychosocial support, sensitization projects (peace, reconciliation etc.), community services, youth programmes, support for special needs, camp committees, Child Friendly Spaces, and Disabled Access. Vulnerable groups may include, but are not limited to: Minority groups; disabled; single headed households; female-headed households; elderly; children Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of displacement sites where specific services exist for vulnerable groups (minority groups, disabled, single headed household, elderly, children)Displacement site; Vulnerable group (disabled, elderly, singel headed household, children)NoOutputYesNew L3 Emergency - Phase 2-4Generic services include WASH, Shelter, NFIs, Health, Education, etc. Vulnerable sectors of the population include the disabled, single-headed households, UAMs, elderly, GBV.FOCUS, Meetings in displacement site, Camp/Site Focal Point, Pre-distribution reports, distribution reports, monitoring reports, DTM reports, Protection Monitoring Tool reports, MIRAC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, (R) Early Recovery, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, E1.1 Equal Access, E1.2 Facilities and services, E1.3 Protection and Well-being, E2.1 Curricula, W7 Aggravating Factors, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-27C4.1 Return/ Relocation/ IntegrationNumber and Percentage of displacement sites with active relocation, reintegration or return programmes.This indicator is intended to measure how many camp managers are actively working on durable solutions. Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageOverall number of displacement sites identified/estimated of the emergencyNumber of displacement sites with active relocation, resettlement or return programmesDisplacement site; sex, age, other diversity concerns of programme participantsNoOutputYesCamp Management Toolkit (Chapter 7)New L3 Emergency - Phase 4Phase 4Evidence of activities will come from a responsible reporting party, such as the site manager or government official responsible for the site.DTM, Site Manager Meeting Minutes, Intention SurveysC4 Camp planning and durable solutions, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, R4 Governance, E1.1 Equal Access
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-28C2.2 Return/ Relocation/ IntegrationNumber and Percentage of displaced persons in displacement sites that cannot returnThis indicator refers to displaced persons by sex and age who intend to return but cannot. This may be for a number of reasons including: lack of money, disability, ongoing security concerns, government or other restrictions on movement. Displaced personsNumber and PercentageTotal number of displaced persons that intend to returnNumber of displaced persons that cannot returnNumber of displaced persons; Intention of return; reason for inability to return; sex; ageNoOutcomeYesCamp Management Toolkit (Chapters 7, 8, 9)New L3 Emergency - Phase 3-4Phase 3, Phase 4DTM reports, Protection Monitoring Tool reportsC2 Population information management, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R3 Capacity Building, S2 Shelter-related NFI, PL2 Access to Land, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-29C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordinationNumber and Percentage of spontaneous displacement sites where a site plan/ map has been created and is kept up to date.Updates to a displacement site plan provide us with a way to measure improvements to the infrastructure of spontaneous displacement sites. Displacement sitesNumber and Percentage (spontaneous)Total number of spontaneous displacement sitesNumber of spontaneous displacement sites with improvements in site planning and facilitiesType of displacement siteNoOutputYesNew L3 Emergency -Phase 2-4Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4DTM reports, CODs, FODs, site management reports, Site Manager meeting minutesC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P5 Vulnerability, W7 Aggravating Factors, E1.1 Equal Access
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-30C1.1 Displacement Site ManagersNumber and Percentage of displacement sites in natural disasters with national authorities as site managersDisplacement sitesNumber and PercentageTotal number of displacement sites in natural disastersNumber of displacement sites with national authorities as site managersDisplacement site; Site management committee; National authority participation in site management committee; sex, age, other diversity concerns of site managerNoOutputYesCamp Management Toolkit (Chapters 1, 2)New L3 Emergency -Phase 2-4 Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4DTM reports, CODs, FODs, site management reportsC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, (R) Early Recovery
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-31C3.1 Displacement Site ManagersNumber and Percentage of site managers with CCCM trainingSite managersNumber and PercentageTotal number of site managersNumber of site managers with CCCM trainingSite manager; CCCM training; Training beneficiary type (Government, NGO, UN, other) ; sex, age, other diversity concerns of site manager with CCCM trainingNoOutputYesCamp Management Toolkit (Chapters 1, 2)See Camp Management ToR to define who is a camp managerNew L3 Emergency -Phase 2-4 Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Training includes CORE, CMC & CCCM trainings.DTM reports, CODs, FODs, site management reports, CCCM training reportsC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-32C2 Population information managementNumber of displacement sites where consultations with all strata of displaced populations take place about their needs to inform planning and programsDisplacement sitesNumber and PercentageTotal number of displacement sitesNumber of displacement sites where consultations with all strata of displaced populations about their needs occurDisplacement site, vulnerable groups; age, sex, other diversity concerns of consulted individualsNoOutputDTM, Sphere: Shelter and settlement standard 1: Strategic planning(P) Protection
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-33C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordinationPercentage of site management personnel (including partners) that have undertaken the IASC Gender E-learning course.Site managersNumber and PercentageTotal number of site managersNumber of site managers that have completed the IASC Gender E-learning courseSite manager, partners; age, sex, other diversity concerns of those who have taken the IASC courseNoOutput(P) Protection
Camp Coordination / ManagementCM-34C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordinationNumber and percentage of displacement sites where gaps in services identified by site managers/DTM are referred, monitored and followed up for responseThis indicator seeks to keep site managers and the CCCM cluster accountable by ensuring gaps which are identified at the displacement site level are referred, monitored and followed up for action by relevant actors (WASH, Shelter, Health, Education, etc.) Displacement sitesNumber and PercentageTotal number of displacement sitesNumber of displacement sites where gaps in services have been referred, monitored and followed up for responseDisplacement SiteYesOutputYesDTM reportsW7 Aggravating Factors, (P) Protection
EducationE-1-01E1.1 Equal AccessPercentage of emergency affected children and youth (5-18 yrs old) attending learning spaces/schools in affected areas.This indicator provides information on children and Youth attending schooling - Gives number of children with access to education. Note that target % will depend on pre-crises enrolment figures (refer to FODs where available) IndividualChildrenTotal # children and youth (5 - 18) in affected areas# of emergency affected children and youth (5-18 yrs old) attending learning spaces/schools in affected areas (Proxy can be: # of children (5-18 years) enrolled in school within the affected area. Or number of open facilities * average number of children at each facility)by geographic location (ie administrative boundary), age and sex, school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary), status of school facility (new, re-opened, damaged, unaffected),YesBaseline, OutcomeYesINEESpecific to CountryInitially based on % of population and pre-crises enrolment figures, later phases use attendance figures (all phases) There is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Alternative formulation of the indicator could be # of children (5-18 years) enrolled in school within the affected area. Proxy indicator can be number of open facilities * average number of children at each facility Disaggregation by primary, secondary and tertiary, note age ranges differ from country to country. Sometimes primary is disaggregated by lower/upper. Also sometimes by formal and non-formal such as accelerated learning and vocational education. In some countries, primary and (higher) secondary education fall under different ministries, which can complicate data collection. Some countries distringuish between primary and secondary, others use basic education, which covers 9 grades. Countries should use what makes most sense, but we should strive towards covering secondary as well.Knowing the ratio of female and male learners will help identify imbalances. Note target will depend on pre-crisis data. Please refer to the FODs where available. In case there is a strong discrepancy between the percentage of girls and of boys enrolled in school, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing in equally accessing education. Please refer to the INEE pocket guide to gender for more information. 50% = gender equality <50% = females are under-represented <50% = males are under-represented National Government (MOE). Cluster Partner reporting - 4Ws, MIRA, other Joint Cluster Needs Assessments (humanitarian caseload monitoring)C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R4 Governance, (P) Protection, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children, PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing
EducationE-1-02E1.1 Equal AccessPercentage of emergency affected children (3-5 yrs old) attending ECD Spaces in affected areasThis indicator provides information on children attending ECD Space. This indicator gives the number of children with access to ECD. IndividualChildrenTotal # of children (3-5 yrs old) in affected areas# of emergency affected children (3-5 yrs old) attending ECD (Child Friendly) Spaces in affected areas (Proxy can be number of open facilities * number of children in each facility)by geographic location (ie administrative boundary), age and sex, school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary), status of school facility (new, re-opened, damaged, unaffected),YesBaseline, OutcomeYesINEESpecific to CountryInitially based on % of population and pre-crises enrolment figures, later phases use attendance figures There is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc... Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4ECD age range may differ from country to country.Knowing the ration of female and male learners will help identify imbalances. Note target will depend on pre-crisis data. Please refer to the FODs where available. In case there is a strong discrepancy between the percentage of girls and of boys enrolled in school, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing in equally accessing education. Please refer to the INEE pocket guide to gender for more information. 50% = gender equality <50% = females are under-represented <50% = males are under-represented National Government (MOE) Cluster Partner reporting - 4Ws, MIRA, other Joint Cluster Needs Assessments (Humanitarian Caseload monitoring)C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, (P) Protection, PC3 Sexual violence, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children, PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R4 Governance
EducationE-1-03E1.1 Equal AccessPercentage of affected schools/learning spaces in affected areaThis indicator gives information on affected school buildings This indicator should breaks down damaged and/or destroyed by degree of damage. FacilitySchools/ Learning spacesTotal # of school buildings/learning spaces in affected area# of affected school buildings/learning spacesby geographic location, school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary), # classrooms , Damage category ((i) No Damage; (ii) Partially Damaged; (iii) Completely Destroyed); note if the school is co-ed, male or femaleYesBaseline, OutcomeYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Damage categories my by locally defined and defined by the local government. Suggeted Damage categories are No Damage Partially Damaged Completely Destroyed *note if the school is co-ed, male or femaleIt is important to continue to ask the question: In countries where girls and boys schools are separated are we able to know which group is particularly affected by the lack of proper school facilities?Cluster Partner reporting - 4WsR2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R4 Governance, S1.1 Access, PC3 Sexual violence, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, PC3 Sexual violence
EducationE-1-04E1.1 Equal AccessPercentage and Number of Temporary Learning Spaces constructed in affected areaThis indicator allows you to track and measure the output activities of constructed Temporary Learning Spaces against the target needed of temporary learning spaces FacilitySchools/ Learning spacesTotal # of Temporary Learning Spaces needed # of Temporary Learning Spaces constructed in affected areaGeography location (ie administrative boundary), Type of school/learning space, # classrooms, # children & youth (by age and sex)YesOutputYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aPreparedness: With government and partners, ensure that pre-crisis baseline data is collected on number and location of schools and number of teachers and students in vulnerable areas. Determine essential supplies needed for temporary learning spaces, including weather appropriate tents, tarpaulins, etc., and determine options for procurement. Identify relevant standby agreements with local suppliers and consider warehousing essential supplies as the situation warrants. Response: With government and partners, determine where temporary learning spaces should be established, ensuring safety and security. Sites should have shade and protection against wind, rain, cold and dust, and be located away from stagnant water, very loud areas, main roads and distribution points. Plan sites with community as partner, preserving previous social arrangements to the extent possible. Consider alternative shelters, besides formal school buildings, such as markets, churches, mosques,temples, etc. Plan sites according to child friendly criteria, with services to include primary education, recreation, psychosocial support, early childhood care and development, youth activities, WASH facilities, and mother support. Determine essential supplies needed for temporary learning spaces, including furniture, weather appropriate tents, tarpaulins, etc., and determine options for procurement. Deploy stockpiled supplies and order additional supplies required based on previous standby agreements with suppliers to meet the demands of temporary learning spaces. Order offshore if local supplies are not available. Collaborate with child protection and WASH to ensure that temporary learning spaces have water and sanitation facilities and are designed to protect children against abuseCluster Partner reporting - 4WsC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R4 Governance, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, PC3 Sexual violence
EducationE-1-05E1.1 Equal AccessPercentage of schools/learning spaces used as shelters in affected areaThis indicator allows you to track the number of schools/learning spaces that are being used as temporary shelters, evauation centers, and occupied by displaced populations FacilitySchools/ Learning spacesTotal # of School/Learning Spaces in affected area# of schools/learning spaces used as temporary sheltersby geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary)YesBaseline, OutcomeYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/an/a Cluster Partner reporting - 4WsC2 Population information management, C2.2 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, C3.8 Access and Movement, C4.1 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R4 Governance, S1.1 Access
EducationE-1-06E1.1 Equal AccessPercentage of damaged or occupied education facilities rehabilitated and reopened in affected areaThis indicator gives information on education facilities re-opend FacilityEducation facilitiesTotal # of affected education facilities # affected education facilities rehabilitatedGeographic location ( ie admisitrative boundary), Type of school/learning space (sex /primary, secondary, tertiary) # classrooms, # of children by age and sexYesOutputYesINEE, Sphere: Shelter and settlement standard 1: Strategic planningSpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/an/aCluster Partner reporting - 4WsR2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R4 Governance, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, C4.1 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, PC3 Sexual violence, PG6 Prevention Programming
EducationE-1-07E1.1 Equal AccessPercentage of schools/learning spaces that lost learning materialsSchools that have lost learning materials FacilitySchools/ Learning spacesTotal # of affected schools/learning spaces# of affected school buildings that lost learning materialsby geographic location (ie administrative boundary), Type of school/learning space (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary), # classroomsYesBaselineNoINEESpecific to CountryNA Baseline and Phase 4 There is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 4n/an/aMoE, Secondary Data Review, NA AssessmentS2.1 Access
EducationE-1-08E1.1 Equal AccessPercentage of schools/learning spaces provided learning materialsSchools provided with learning materials FacilitySchools/ Learning spacesTotal # of affected school buildings/learning spaces# of affected school buildings provided with learning materialsby geographic location ( ie administrative boundary), Type of school/learning space (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary), # classroomsYesOutputYesINEESpecific to CountryNA Baseline and Phase 4 There is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 4n/an/aCluster Partner reporting - 4WsC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter
EducationE-1-09E1.1 Equal AccessNumber of education kits required in affected areaEducation Kits required in affected area KitsN/A# of education kits required in affected areaBy geographic location ( ie administrative boundary), Kit type (School kits, recreation kits, teacher kits, student kits, sanitation kits), School type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary),YesBaselineNoINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...There are different typs of kits which can be defined locally and what it contains may differ. n/aMoE, Needs Assessment C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, PG6 Prevention Programming, S2.1 Access
EducationE-1-10E1.1 Equal AccessPercentage and number of affected Schools/learning spaces provided education kitsEducation Kits distributed FacilitySchools/Learning SpacesTotal number of affected schools/learning spaces Number of affected Schools/learning spaces provided education kitsBy geographic location ( ie administrative boundary), Kit type (School kits, recreation kits, teacher kits, student kits, sanitation kits), School type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary), number of kits per school YesOutputYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...There are different typs of kits which can be defined locally and what it contains may differ. Recreation Kits: A box with materials that enables children to participate in team sports and games under the guidance of a teacher. The Early Childhood Development Kit: The Kit contains materials to help caregivers create a safe learning enviornment for up to 50 young children ages 0-6 If formal curriculum materials are not available work with MoE officials and partners to identify numbers and types of pre-packaged kits needed for affected locations. If not already completed during the emergency education preparedness phase, with MoE and partners, localize, adapt and translate into appropriate local languages emergency education teacher's guides and curriculum materials to be used in conjunction with each pre-packaged kit. Develop a localized version of the Early Childhood Education Kit if it was not done during preparedness phase. In collaboration with MoE counterparts and partners, identify the key supplies needed to restart educational activities. With Supply Officer, identify the sources of potential supplies. Consider pre-positioned supplies and existing stocks of supplies from the regular country programme that can be diverted to meet emergency needs. Decide whether to order supplies locally or offshore, based on availability, quality, cost and delivery time. Get cost estimates from the Supply Officer, including freight, warehousing, and delivery costs. Identify funding sources and ensure there is sufficient funding available for the supply requirements. Complete supply requisition/PGM in ProMS. Include information on the target arrival date at the final destination or port of entry Follow up to ensure timely delivery and distribution of supplies. If there are obstacles to delivery due to the emergency, work with NGOs and CBOs and other partners to find alternative ways to deliver supplies. Monitor delivery of supplies to ensure arrival, quality and proper use.Cluster Partner Reporting-4WC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter
EducationE-1-11E1.2 Facilities and servicesNumber and percentage of emergency affected children (3-18 years) accessing to emergency education programmes that incorporate health interventionsChildren and Youth with access to with school health interventions IndividualChildrenTotal # of affected children (3-18 years)# of affected children (3-18 years) with access to emergency education programmes that incorporate health interventions in affected areasby geographic location ( ie administrative boundary), type of school/learning space (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary), # children by age and sexNoBaseline, Outcome, OutputYesINEE, Sphere Health chapterSpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...n/aMoE, NA Assessment, Cluster Partner Reporting-4WC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.5 Service Provision - Food and Nutrition, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, C3.10 Service Provision - Health, F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R4 Governance, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, H6 Environmental Health
EducationE-1-12E1.2 Facilities and servicesPercentage of learning spaces/schools with adequate male and female WASH facilities in affected areasSchools/learning spaces with adequate male and female WASH facilities FacilitySchools/ Learning spacesTotal # of affected schools/ learning spaces# of affected schools/learning spaces with adequate male and female WASH facilitiesby geographic location ( ie administrative boundary), type of school/learning space (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary), WASH facility male and female (# of latrine doors for m/f)YesBaseline, OutcomeNoINEE, Sphere WASH chapterSpecific to CountryPre-Crisis Data, NA Baseline There is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Pre-crisis/BaselineWASH facilities are adequate water source, latrines/toilets. See INEE for definition of "adequate" . Also refer to the INEE pocket guide on gender for a definition of "adequate" which means that there are separate latrine doors for girls and for boys, with a pictogram, and that can be locked from the inside. What are the recommendations for teachers latrines in terms of sex separation?n/aCluster Partner reporting - 4Ws, Education Cluster Needs Assessment, EMISC3.2 Service Provision - WASH, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R4 Governance, W1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W3.1 Environment, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors
EducationE-1-13E1.2 Facilities and servicesPercentage of learning spaces/schools provided with adequate male and or female WASH facilities in affected areasSchools provided adequate with male and or female WASH facilities FacilitySchools/ Learning spacesTotal # of affected schools/learning spaces needing adequate male and or female WASH facilities# of affected schools/learning spaces with adequate male and or female WASH facilities constructed/ rehabilitatedby geographic location ( ie administrative boundary), type of school/learning space (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary), WASH facility male and female (# of latrine doors for m/f)YesOutputYesINEE, Sphere WASH chapterSpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...WASH facilities are adequate water source, latrines/toilets. See INEE for definition of "adequate" . Also refer to the INEE pocket guide on gender for a definition of "adequate" which means that there are separate latrine doors for girls and for boys, with a pictogram, and that can be locked from the inside. What are the recommendations for teachers latrines in terms of sex separation?n/aCluster Partner reporting - 4WsC3.2 Service Provision - WASH, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R4 Governance, W1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W3.1 Environment, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors
EducationE-1-14E1.3 Protection and Well-beingNumber and percentage of assessed formal and informal learning environments that are considered safe for boys and girls of different agesSchools/ Learning Spaces that are safe and protective FacilitySchools/ Learning spacesTotal # of learning spaces assessed in affected area# of affected school/learning spaces assessed safe and protectiveGeography location ( ie. administrative boundary), type of learning space (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary)NoBaseline, Outcome, OutputYesChild ProtectionSpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...n/ahttp://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1103 http://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1064MoE, NA Assessment, Cluster Partner Reporting-4WC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, (P) Protection, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, PC6 Child Labour, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), S1.2 Assistance
EducationE-1-15E1.3 Protection and Well-beingNumber of incidents where formal and informal education facilities, students, teachers and other education personnel have been attackedSchools that have been attacked attack incidentsn/a# of incidents where formal and informal education facilities, students, teachers and other education personnel have been attackedGeographic Location ( ie administrative boundary); Type of incident/ date (time period); Type of Incident - Learning spaces/ Schools/ teachers/ students/ education personnel/Age/sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesChild ProtectionSpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...need to cover the number of incidents in specific time periods to see if incidents are reducing or increasing. Part of MRM reportingn/aMoE, NA Assessment, Cluster Partner Reporting-4W(P) Protection, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, PC6 Child Labour, PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, PM1 Clearance of Mines and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW), P5 Vulnerability
EducationE-1-16E1.1 Equal AccessPercentage of schools/learning spaces occupied by security forces in affected areaSchools occupied by armed groups FacilitySchools/ Learning spacesTotal # of School/ Learning Spaces in affected arrea# of schools/ learning spaces occupied by security forces in affected areaby geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary)YesBaseline, OutcomeYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...n/an/aMoE, NA Assessment, Cluster Partner Reporting-4WC2 Population information management, (P) Protection, PC6 Child Labour
EducationE-1-17E1.2 Facilities and servicesNumber and percentage of emergency affected children/youth (3-18 years) accessing to emergency education programmes that incorporate nutrition interventionsChildren and Youth with access to schools with nutrition programmes IndividualChildrenTotal # of affected children (3-18 years)# of affected children (3-18 years) with access to emergency education programmes that incorporate nutrition interventions by geographic location (ie administrative boundary), age and sex, school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary), status of school facility (new, re-opened, damaged, unaffected),NoBaseline, Outcome, OutputYesINEE, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chapterSpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...n/an/aMoE, NA Assessment, Cluster Partner Reporting-4WPC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.5 Service Provision - Food and Nutrition, F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding
EducationE-1-18E1.2 Facilities and servicesPercentage of affected schools/learning spaces with feeding programmesSchools/learnnig spaces with feeding programmes FacilitySchools/ Learning spacesTotal number of affected schools/learning spaces Number of affected schools/learning spaces with feeding programs by geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary)YesBaseline, Outcome, OutputYesINEE, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chapterSpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...MoE, NA Assessment, Cluster Partner Reporting-4WC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.5 Service Provision - Food and Nutrition, C3.10 Service Provision - Health, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding
EducationE-1-19E1.2 Facilities and servicesPercentage of schools/learning spaces structures that meet the mimumun safe construction standardsSchools/learning spaces meet safe construction standards FacilitySchools/ Learning spacesTotal number of schools/learning spaces in affected areaNumber of school /learning space structures that meeting the minimum stafe construction standards in affected areaby geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary)YesBaseline, Outcome, OutputYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...See Guidance Notes on Safer School Construction: The Guidance Notes briefly address the need and rationale for safer school buildings; recommend a series of suggested steps that highlight key points that should be considered when planning a safer school construction and/or retrofitting initiative; and identify basic design principles and requirements a school building must meet to provide a greater level of protection. Finally, the Guidance Notes provide a list of key resources for more detailed, technical and context-specific information. http://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1005MoE, NA Assessment, Cluster Partner Reporting-4WPC3 Sexual violence
EducationE-1-20E1.2 Facilities and servicesPercentage of schools/learning spaces accessible for children with physical and or learning disabilities Schools accessible for children with disabilites (physical and or learning disabiliies) FacilitySchools/ Learning spacesTotal number of affected schools/learning spaceNumber of affected schools/learning spaces accessible for children with physical and or learning disabilities by geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary)YesBaseline, Outcome, OutputYesINEE, SPHERESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...See INEE Pocket Guide to Supporting Learners with Disabilities which offers practical ideas for including children and young people with disabilities.http://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1138 See Pocket Guide to Supporting Learners with Disabilities Implementation Tools for useful resources and tools: http://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1139MoE, NA Assessment, Cluster Partner Reporting-4WC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.6 Service Provision - Education, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, P5 Vulnerability
EducationE-1-21E1.2 Facilities and servicesPercentage of affected marganalised children (3-18 years) attending school?Marganlised children attending school. Marganalised to be defined locally IndividualChildren Total number of affected marganalised children (3-18 years) in affected areaNumber of affected marganalised children (3-18 years) affending school by geographic location (ie administrative boundary), age and sex, school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary)YesBaseline, Outcome, OutputYesINEE, SPHERESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...See Pocket Guide to Inclusive Education http://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1007MoE, NA Assessment, Cluster Partner Reporting-4WPC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, P5 Vulnerability, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.6 Service Provision - Education
EducationE-1-22E1.3 Protection and Well-beingPercentage of affected Teachers and other Education Personnel receving pschosocial support Affected education personnel receiving psychosocial support IndividualEducation Personnel Total Number of affected Teachers and Education PersonnelNumber of affected Teachers and other Education Personnel receving pschosocial support by geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school level (primary, secondary, tertiary), sexYesBaseline, Outcome, OutputYesINEE, SPHERESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...See INEE Psychosocial support guidance and implementing materials http://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1065 http://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1104Cluster Partner Reporting-4WC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, (P) Protection, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), P5 Vulnerability
EducationE-1-23E1.2 Facilities and servicesPercentage of affeceted schools/learning spaces with adequate quantites of safe water for drinking and personal hygiene Affected schools with adequate supplies of safe water for drinking and hygiene purposes FacilitySchools/ Learning spacesTotal number of Schools/adequate quantites of safe water for drinking and personal hygiene in affected areaNumber of affected schools/learning spaces with adequate quantites of safe water for drinking and personal hygiene by geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary)YesBaseline, Outcome, OutputYesINEE, Sphere: Shelter and settlement standard 1: Strategic planning, Sphere: Water supply standard 1: Access and water quantitySpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...MoE, NA Assessment, Cluster Partner Reporting-4WC3.2 Service Provision - WASH, W1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality, W2.3 Water Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors
EducationE-1-24E1.2 Facilities and servicesPercentage of affected schools/learning spaces provided with adequate water supplies/facilities for drinking and personal hygieneAffected Schools / Learning Spaces  with adequate supplies of safe water for drinking and hygiene purposes  FacilitySchools/ Learning spacesTotal number of affected schools needing adequate water supplies/facilites Number of affected schools/learning spaces provided with adequate water supplies /facilities for drinking and personal hygiene by geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary)NoOutputYesINEE, SPHERESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, e.g the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc.MoE, NA Assessment, Cluster Partner Reporting-4WC3.2 Service Provision - WASH, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, W1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality, W2.3 Water Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors
EducationE-1-25E1.2 Facilities and servicesPercentage of affected schools/learning spaces with adequate hand washing facilitiesAffected Schools / Learning Spaces  with adequate hand washing facilities  FacilitySchools/Learning SpacesTotal number of affected schoolsNumber of affected schools/learning spaces with adequate hand washing facilitiesby geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary)YesBaseline, OutcomeNoINEE, SPHERESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, e.g the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc.MoE, NA Assessment, Cluster Partner Reporting-4WW1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors
EducationE-1-26E1.2 Facilities and servicesPercentage of affected schools/learning spaces provided with adequate hand washing facilitiesAffected Schools / Learning Spaces  provided with adequate hand washing facilities  FacilitySchools/Learning SpacesTotal number of affected schools needing adequate hand washing facilities Number of affected schools/learning spaces provided adequate hand washing facilitiesby geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary)NoOutputYesINEE, SPHERESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, e.g the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc.MoE, NA Assessment, Cluster Partner Reporting-4WW1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH
EducationE-1-27E1.2 Facilities and servicesPercentage of affected learning spaces/schools with a functioning solid waste management systemSchools / Learning Spaces  with functioning solid waste management system  FacilitySchools/Learning SpacesTotal number of affected schools Number of affected learning spaces/schools with a functioning solid waste management systemby geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary)YesBaseline, OutcomeINEE, SPHERESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, e.g the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc.MoE, NA Assessment, Cluster Partner Reporting-4WW1.2 Hygiene Practices, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors
EducationE-1-28E1.2 Facilities and servicesPercentage of affected learning spaces/schools provided with a functioning solid waste management systemSchools / Learning Spaces  provided functioning solid waste management system  FacilitySchools/ Learning spacesTotal number of affected schools needing a functioning solid waste management systemNumber of affected learning spaces/schools provided a functioning solid waste management systemby geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary)NoOutputYesINEE, SPHERESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, e.g the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc.MoE, NA Assessment, Cluster Partner Reporting-4WC3.2 Service Provision - WASH, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors
EducationE-2-01E2.1 CurriculaPercentage of emergency affected learning spaces/ schools in target areas incorporating psycho-social supportSchools providing Psychosocial support FacilitySchools/ Learning spacesTotal number of affected schools/learning spaces # of affected learning spaces/schools incorporating psycho-social supportGeography, Type of school/learning space (sex /primary, secondary, tertiary)NoBaseline, Outcome, OutputYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Cluster Partner reporting - 4Ws, MIRA, other Joint Cluster Needs Assessments (Humanitarian Caseload monitoring), EMISC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, R4 Governance, (P) Protection, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial)
EducationE-2-02E2.1 CurriculaPercentage of emergency affected learning spaces/ schools in affected areas where children and youth receive key messages on emergency life skillsSchools providing Life skills FacilitySchools/Learning SpacesTotal # of affected schools/learning spaces# of emergency affected learning spaces/schools where children and youth receive key messages on emergency life skillsby geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary)NoBaseline, Outcome, OutputYesINEE, SPHERESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...n/aSee INEE Life Skills and Complementary Education Guidance: http://www.ineesite.org/en/resources/life_skills_and_complementary_education See Life Skills for Adolescents: http://www.ineesite.org/en/resources/life_skills_for_adolescents Cluster Partner reporting - 4Ws, MIRA, other Joint Cluster Needs Assessments (Humanitarian Caseload monitoring), EMISC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, R4 Governance, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), PM1 Clearance of Mines and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW), PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial)
EducationE-2-03E2.1 CurriculaPercentage of emergency affected learning spaces/ schools in target areas where children and youth receive key messages on DRRSchools providing DRR key messages FacilitySchools/Learning SpacesTotal # of affected learning spaces/schools # of affected learning spaces/schools where children and youth receive key messages on DRR in target areasby geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary)NoBaseline, Outcome, OutputYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...n/aSee INEE DDR Guidance and Implementing Materials http://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1054 http://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1097Cluster Partner reporting - 4Ws, MIRA, other Joint Cluster Needs Assessments (Humanitarian Caseload monitoring), EMISC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, R4 Governance, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial)
EducationE-2-04E2.1 CurriculaPercentage of teachers/other educational personnel in affected areas trained in psycho-social supportTeachers trained in psychosocial support IndividualEducation PersonnelTotal # of affected teachers/other educational personnel # of affected teachers/other educational personnel trained in pycho-social supportby geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school level (primary, secondary, tertiary), sexNoOutputYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...n/aSee INEE Psychosocial support guidance and implementing materials http://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1065 http://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1104Cluster Partner reporting - 4WsR4 Governance, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, P5 Vulnerability
EducationE-2-05E2.1 CurriculaPercentage of teachers/other educational personnel in affected areas trained in emergency life skillsTeachers trained in Life Skills IndividualEducation PersonnelTotal # of affected teachers/other educational personnel # of affected teachers/other educational personnel trained in emergency life skillsby geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school level (primary, secondary, tertiary), sexNoOutputYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...n/aSee INEE Life Skills and Complementary Education Guidance: http://www.ineesite.org/en/resources/life_skills_and_complementary_education See Life Skills for Adolescents: http://www.ineesite.org/en/resources/life_skills_for_adolescents Cluster Partner reporting - 4WsR4 Governance, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PM1 Clearance of Mines and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW), P5 Vulnerability
EducationE-2-06E2.1 CurriculaPercentage of teachers/other educational personnel in affected areas trained in DRRTeachers trained in DRR IndividualEducation PersonnelTotal # of affected teachers/other educational personnel # of affected teachers/other educational personnel trained in DRRby geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school level (primary, secondary, tertiary), sexNoOutputYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...n/aSee INEE DDR Guidance and Implementing Materials http://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1054 http://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1097Cluster Partner reporting - 4WsR4 Governance, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), P5 Vulnerability
EducationE-2-07E2.1 CurriculaPercentage of affected schools/learning spaces with DDR interventionsSchools with DDR interventions FacilitySchools/Learning SpacesTotal number of affected schools/learning spaces Number of affected schools/learning spaces with DDR interventions by geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary)NoBaseline, OutcomeYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...See INEE DDR Guidance and Implmenting Materials http://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1055 http://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1097 MoE, NA Assessment, Cluster Partner Reporting-4WR4 Governance, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial)
EducationE-2-08E2.1 CurriculaPercentage of affected schools/learning spaces with peacebuilding programs Schools with peacebuilding programs FacilitySchools/Learning SpacesTotal number of affected schools/learning spaces Number of affected schools/learning spaces with peacebuilding programs by geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary)NoOutputYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...See Peace Education Programme Materials http://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1117 See also guidance on Protecting Education in Countries Affected by Conflict - Booklet 6 - Education for Building Peace http://education.humanitarianresponse.info/system/files/documents/files/Cluster%20booklet%206%20-%20Education%20for%20Buidling%20Peace_0.pdf Cluster Partner Reporting-4WC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, R4 Governance, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial)
EducationE-2-09E2.1 CurriculaPercentage of affected schools/learning spaces promoting health and hygiene including sexual and reproductive health and HIV AIDSSchools with health programs FacilitySchools/Learning SpacesTotal number of affected schools/learning spaces Number of affected schools/learning spaces promoting health and hygiene including sexual and reproductive health and HIV AIDSby geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary)YesBaseline, Outcome, OutputYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...See guidance and implmenting materials on on HIV in Education in Emergencies http://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1140 http://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1100 http://toolkit.ineesite.org/toolkit/Toolkit.php?PostID=1060 MoE, NA Assessment, Cluster Partner Reporting-4WC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, R4 Governance, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), P5 Vulnerability, W1.2 Hygiene Practices, W4 Vector Control, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors
EducationE-2.10E2.1 CurriculaPercentage of affected s affected schools/learning spaces with active recreational sports education programs for boys and girls Schools/learning spaces with active recreational sports education programs for boys and girls FacilitySchools/Learning SpacesTotal number of affected schools/learning spaces Number of affected schools/learning spaces with active recreational sports education programs for boys and girls by geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school type (sex/primary, secondary, tertiary)YesBaseline, Outcome, OutputYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...MoE, NA Assessment, Cluster Partner Reporting-4WC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C4.1 Return/ Relocation/ Integration, R4 Governance, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour
EducationE-3-1E3.2 Recruitment and SelectionPercentage of affected teachers teaching in affected areaTeachers teaching in affected area IndividualEducation PersonnelTotal # number of affected teachers# of affected teachers teachingby geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school level (primary, secondary, tertiary), sexYesOutcome, OutputYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...n/an/aCluster Partner reporting - 4WsR2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, PC3 Sexual violence, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children
EducationE-3-2E3.2 Recruitment and SelectionRatio of affected teachers teaching in affected areaTeacher Ratio in affected area. Knowing the existing ration of female and male teachers could help identify imbalances which could help inform the recruitment and selection process. Note target will depend on pre-crisis data. Please refer to the FODs where available. IndividualEducation Personnel# affected Male Teachers teaching # of affected Female Teachers teachingby geographic location ( ie administrative boundary) and school level (primary, secondary, tertiary), sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...n/a1 = gender equality The closer to 0, the more females are under-represented >1 = males are under-representedCluster Partner reporting - 4WsR2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, PC3 Sexual violence, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children
EducationE-3-3E3.2 Recruitment and SelectionNumber of new teachers required for affected areaNumber of new teachers required IndividualEducation Personneln/a# of new teachers required for affected areaGeography( ie. Administrative boundary), sex and school level (ECD/ primary/ secondary/ tertiary/ non formal)YesBaseline, OutcomeYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...n/an/aCluster Partner reporting - 4WsR2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, PC3 Sexual violence, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children
EducationE-3-4E3.2 Recruitment and SelectionNumber of new facilitators/volunteers/peer educators recruited for affected areaNumber of other classroom staff recruited IndividualEducation Personneln/a# of new facilitators/volunteers/peer educators recruited for affected areaGeography (ie. Administrative boundary), sex and job title, school level (ECD/ primary/ secondary/ tertiary/ non formal)NoOutputYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...n/an/aCluster Partner reporting - 4WsR2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, PC3 Sexual violence, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children
EducationE-3-5E3.3 SupervisionNumber and percentage of surveyed active-duty education staff who have signed the adopted code of conductTeachers working to code of practice IndividualEducation PersonnelTotal # of active-duty education staff who have signed the code of conduct# of active-duty education staff surveyedGeography (ie. Administrative boundary), sex and job title, school level (ECD/ primary/ secondary/ tertiary/ non formal)NoBaseline, OutcomeYesChild ProtectionSpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...n/an/aCluster Partner reporting - 4WsR2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, PC3 Sexual violence, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children, PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM), PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PG6 Prevention Programming
EducationE-3-6E3.3 SupervisionPercentage of affected Ministry of Education Office facilitiesAffected Ministry of Education office facilities are those slightly damaged, moderately damaged, and severely damaged. This indicator should breaks down damaged and/or destroyed shelter by degree of damage. FacilityEducation FacilitiesTotal # of Education Office facilities in affected area# of affected Education Office facilities in affected areaGeography (ie. Administrative boundary), sex and job title, school level (ECD/ primary/ secondary/ tertiary/ non formal)NoBaseline, OutcomeYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...n/an/aCluster Partner reporting - 4WsS1.1 Access, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, PC3 Sexual violence, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, PC6 Child Labour, PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children
EducationE-4-1E4.1 Law and Policy FormulationPercentage of MoE officials at sub-national level in emergency affected areas trained in EiELocal MoE officials trained in EiE IndividualPublic sector employee# of MoE officials in emergency affected areas# of MoE officials at sub-national level in emergency affected areas trained in Education in Emergencies (EIE)Geography location ( ie. Administrative boundary), sex , Level of personnel (management, teacher)NoBaseline, Outcome, OutputYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...n/an/aCluster Partner reporting - 4WsC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, R4 Governance, PC3 Sexual violence, PG6 Prevention Programming, P5 Vulnerability
EducationE-4-2E4.1 Law and Policy FormulationPercentage of MoE officials at sub-national level in emergency affected areas attending trainingLocal MoE officials trained in EiE IndividualPublic sector employee# of MoE officials in emergency affected areas# of MoE officials at sub-national level in emergency affected areas trained in Education in Emergencies (EIE)Geography ( ie administrative boundary), sex , Level of personnel (management, teacher)NoBaseline, Outcome, OutputYesINEESpecific to CountryThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...n/an/aCluster Partner reporting - 4WsC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, R4 Governance, PC3 Sexual violence, PG6 Prevention Programming, P5 Vulnerability
Food SecurityF-1F3 Food AccessChange in food consumption patternsCan be measured by several indicatos like Food Consumption Score (FCS) And Household dietary diveristy score (HDDS). Current compared to pre-crisis. Frequency of meals, dietary diversity, increase/ decrease of certain food items. HouseholdHouseholdGeography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Context specific (HH, Community, Individual); Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklists 1 and 2, Sphere: Food security and nutrition assessment standard 1: Food securitySignficant Change. To be compared with pre-crisis baselineAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-10F6 AvailabilityChange in availability of key commodities in marketsMeasuring the difference in availability of key commodities will indicate if markets are under stress at different periods of time in comparison to the baseline. Othernumber of food commuditiesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklists 1 and 2R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods
Food SecurityF-11F6 AvailabilityPercentage of Households by duration of staple food stockPercentage of households that have stocks of staple food to feed their family or have the capacity to access food stocks for a given duration of time. HouseholdHouseholdsPending Food Cluster review in 2013.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Geography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklists 1 and 2n/aAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.(R) Early Recovery
Food SecurityF-12F6.1 Food Availability and AgricultureChange in production compared to previous year’s harvest by commodityComparing the last years' (normal production) with the post crisis crop production which is also an indicator that can give information on household access to income OtherPending Food Cluster review in 2013. Pending Food Cluster review in 2013. Geography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities) Baseline, OutcomeYesSignificant Change. To be compared with pre-crisis baseline Appropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergency Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Pending Food Cluster review in 2013. Pending Food Cluster review in 2013. (R) Early Recovery
Food SecurityF-13F6 AvailabilityPercentage of Households/ communities unable to plant for next seasonShare of households that are unable to restart their agricultural activities in the upcoming cropping season. To be able to farm, HHs need access to arable land, seeds, tools and other agricultural inputs. Depending on the type of crisis, one or more of these can become unavailable. Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Geography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesn/aAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4This indicator is more precise measured as % of HH, however if this information is not available particularly in early phases of the emergency then % of communities can be used as a proxy.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods
Food SecurityF-14F6 AvailabilityChange in herd sizesReporting on the percentage of change to overall herd sizes (households that either lost animals because of the crisis or had to sell or slaughter their animals as an emergency measure). HouseholdPending Food Cluster review in 2013.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Geography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, LEGS: Veterinary Support Standard 1: Assessment and planningn/aAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4This indicator is more precise measured as % of HH, however if this information is not available particularly in early phases of the emergency then % of communities can be used as a proxy.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.
Food SecurityF-15F6 AvailabilityNumber of reported animal disease outbreaksNumber of animal disease outbreaks in a community or in any given geographical area. Number (animals)Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Geography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, LEGS: Provision of Water Standard 1: Assessment and planning, LEGS: Veterinary Support Standard 1: Assessment and planningn/aAppropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergency Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Need to define which HHs to be included in the denominatorPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.H6 Environmental Health
Food SecurityF-16F6 AvailabilityPercentage of Households with suitable daily water and fodder consumption for livestockPercentage of households that have enough suitable water and fodder available for their animals. In many contexts in may be relevant to collect the data by community. HouseholdsPending Food Cluster review in 2013.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Geography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, LEGS: Ensuring Feed Supplies Standard 1: Assessment and planning, LEGS: Provision of Water Standard 1: Assessment and planningn/aAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Need to define which HHs to be included in the denominatorPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality
Food SecurityF-17F7 UtilizationPercentage of individuals having daily access to an appropriate amount of safe waterPercentage of individuals/HHs that have daily access to an appropriate quantity  (a minimum of 15 litres per person per day of water) and quality of water, coming from an improved water source. IndividualLEGS: Water Points Standard 1: Location of water points, LEGS: Water Point Standard 2: Water point rehabilitation and establishment, LEGS: Water Standard 1: Assessment and planning, Sphere: Water supply standard 1: Access and water quantity, Sphere: Water supply standard 2: Water qualityW2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality
Food SecurityF-18F7 UtilizationPercentage of HHs with capacity to prepare food safelyproportion of households with capacity to prepare food safely (fuel, water, cooking utensils, food) Households Sphere: Food security - food transfers standard 6: Food useH6 Environmental Health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, W1.1 Hygiene items, W1.2 Hygiene Practices
Food SecurityF-19F7 UtilizationPercentage of households that have changed intra-household food distributionAssessing the impact of the crisis on food distribution patterns inside the HHs. The change can occur in several ways and have several degrees of severity: i.e. adults restrict consumption for children to eat, women do not eat to give food only to men (as they work) etc. HouseholdsPending Food Cluster review in 2013.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Geography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, Sphere: Food security - livelihoods standard 2: Income and employment (Key indicator 3 and Guidance Note 8)n/aAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyn/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding
Food SecurityF-2F3 Food AccessChange in food sourceChange in % share of sources for obtaining food compared to baseline, which could include food purchase, food production, borrowed food, food aid, gifts, barter or wild foods. HouseholdsHouseholdGeography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2Signficant Change. To be compared with pre-crisis baselineAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.
Food SecurityF-3F3 Food Access% change in key food & non-food commodity pricesComparison between pre-crisis and actual prices of the main food and non-food commodities in the market. OtherPricesNoLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, Sphere: Food security - cash and voucher transfers standard 1: Access to available goods and services, Sphere: Food security chapter, Annex 1: Food Security and livelihoods assessment checklists (baseline)R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, W1.1 Hygiene items, W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-4F3 Food AccessCoping StrategiesCan be measured by several indicatos like the reduced Coping Strategy Index, the Household Hunger Scale or similar hunger experience indicator. Also the livelihood component can be included. HouseholdHouseholdLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, Sphere: Food security and nutrition assessment standard 1: Food security (Guidance note 8 on coping strategies), Sphere: Food security chapter, Annex 1: Food Security and livelihoods assessment checklists (baseline), Sphere: Food security - livelihoods standards, Sphere: Food security standard 1: General food security (Guidance Note 3 on Risks associated with coping strategies)P5 Vulnerability, S3.2 Assistance, W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-5F3 Food AccessChange in main source of incomethe changes occurred to the income derived from any given sources. It is imperative to have pre-crisis information to be able to value it. Example of sources of income can include crop production, wage labour, trading, livestock, fishery, exploitation of natural resources, salary and remittances. HouseholdHouseholdGeography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, Sphere: Food security chapter, Annex 1: Food Security and livelihoods assessment checklists (baseline), Sphere: Food security - livelihoods standardsSignficant Change. To be compared with pre-crisis baselineAppropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergency Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Specify what is intended by staple food; levels / threshold will vary according to context.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy, W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-6F3 Food AccessChange in ability to meet survival and livelihoods protection thresholdsThis indicator uses the HEA approach to determine households’ survival and livelihoods protection thresholds and with shocks, their ability to meet their needs, using their coping strategies, as per the baseline.HouseholdsHouseholdLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2For Standards, also see: Sphere: Food security and nutrition chapter + assessment annexesP5 Vulnerability, W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-7F3 Food AccessExpenditure patternsChange in expenditure patterns in % terms, especially on items such as food, health, education, housing, transportation, clothing fuel and water among others.. HouseholdHouseholdGeography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, Sphere: Food security - cash and voucher transfers standard 1: Access to available goods and servicesSignficant Change. To be compared with pre-crisis baselineAppropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergency Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Levels / threshold will vary according to contextPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-8F3 Food Accesschange in HH ownership of productive assetsRecording of the pre- and post-crises ownership of specific assets. Assets are generally classified as productive assets (if linked to a livelihood and income generating activities) and household assets. HouseholdHouseholdsGeography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2, Sphere: Food security and nutrition assessment standard 1: Food security, Sphere: Food security standard 1: General food security (Guidance Note 3 on Risks associated with coping strategies)n/aAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.(R) Early Recovery
Food SecurityF-9F3 Food AccessChange in access to functioning marketsA market is here understood as a place where people are able to buy and sell products, including food, agricultural inputs and other consumption goods. Functioning markets are characterised by the existence of competition (between sellers as well as buyers), and availability of information. VillageGeography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)Baseline, OutcomeYesLEGS Chapter 3: Initial Assessment Checklist 2n/aAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-Output-1F1 Food AssistanceNumber of beneficiaries receiving food, non-food items, cash transfers and vouchers as % of plannedIndividualGeography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)OutputYesLEGS: Core Standard 6: Monitoring, Evaluation and Livelihoods Impact, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chaptern/aAppropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergency Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.W1.1 Hygiene items, W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-Output-10F8 Agriculture and LivestockQuantity of input items distributed, as % of plannedOtherAgricultural inputs LEGS: Core Standard 6: Monitoring, Evaluation and Livelihoods Impact, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chapter
Food SecurityF-Output-11F1 Food AssistanceNumber of people trained as % of planned (e.g. best nutrition practice or land conservation etc.)IndividualTotal planned peopleActual number of peopleLEGS: Core Standard 6: Monitoring, Evaluation and Livelihoods ImpactR3 Capacity Building
Food SecurityF-Output-12F1 Food AssistanceNumber of market system actors involved in emergency responseIndividualTraders, retailes, or other
Food SecurityF-Output-13F1 Food AssistanceNumber of institutional sites assisted (e.g. schools, health centres), as % of plannedFacilitySchool, health centres or otherE1 Access and Learning Environment, R4 Governance, W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-Output-2F1 Food AssistanceQuantity of food/value of cash/voucher received by beneficiary HH (and proportion in relation to food basket)This indicator should express the percentage of the food needs that are covered by the ration distributed Othern/aTotal planned food basket per HHActual received by HHGeography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)OutputYesLEGS: Core Standard 6: Monitoring, Evaluation and Livelihoods Impactn/aAppropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergency Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods
Food SecurityF-Output-3F1 Food AssistanceQuantity of food assistance distributed, as % of plannedOtherTons, or value of cash or vouchersTotal quantity plannedActual distributed
Food SecurityF-Output-4F1 Food AssistanceTotal value of cash or vouchers for food and basic needs distributed, as % of plannedOtherValue of cahs and/or vouchersTotal quantity plannedActual distributedLEGS: Core Standard 6: Monitoring, Evaluation and Livelihoods ImpactR1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods
Food SecurityF-Output-5F1 Food AssistanceFrequency of food/cash assistance to beneficiary HH (months)OtherNumber of months
Food SecurityF-Output-6F1.4 Livelihood RecoveryTotal value of cash and vouchers for livelihood recovery distributed to targeted beneficiaries as % of plannedother Value of cash and/or vouchersLEGS: Core Standard 6: Monitoring, Evaluation and Livelihoods ImpactR1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods
Food SecurityF-Output-7F1 Food AssistanceNumber of assets built, restored or maintained to targeted beneficiaries, by type and unit of measure (e.g. hectares of land where conservation activities were implemented, length and type of irrigation systems restored, hectares recovered for farming)Title: Number of assets built, restored or maintained to targeted beneficiaries, by type and unit of measure (e.g. hectares of land where conservation activities were implemented, length and type of irrigation systems restored, hectares recovered for farming) as % of planned OtherNumber of assets LEGS: Core Standard 6: Monitoring, Evaluation and Livelihoods ImpactR4 Governance, W7 Aggravating Factors
Food SecurityF-Output-8F8 Agriculture and LivestockNumber of beneficiaries receiving agricultural inputs as % of planned beneficiariesIncluding animals IndividualNumberPending Food Cluster review in 2013.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Geography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)OutputYesLEGS: Core Standard 6: Monitoring, Evaluation and Livelihoods Impactn/aAppropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergency Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.
Food SecurityF-Output-9F8 Agriculture and LivestockGermination rates/harvest quantities as % of plannedPending Food Cluster review in 2013. Othern/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.Pending Food Cluster review in 2013.Geography; Sex; Age; Disabilities; Any other relevant criteria, such as urban/rural, community, household, religious, ethnic or political identities)OutputYesn/aAppropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergency Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.n/aPending Food Cluster review in 2013.R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods
HealthH-A.1.aH1 General clinical services & essential trauma careNumber of functional basic health units/10 000 populationProxy indicator of geographical accessibility, and of equity in availability of health facilities across different administrative units. FacilityThe total population for the same administrative or health area, at the same point in timeThe number of basic health units, i.e. all public and private health facilities, defined as a static facility (a designated building) or mobile clinics in which general health services are offered, in a defined administrative or health area, at a given point in timeAdministrative area; health area; public/private; fixed/mobile; support/no support from humanitarian organisations;YesBaseline, OutputYesSphere: Health systems standard 1: Health service delivery (Key indicator 1)1 Basic Health Unit per 10,000 population Follow-up of trendsThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Calculation: Basic health unit is related to the lowest level of health facility at the national level. This indicator can be adjusted to measure the support provided by one or several humanitarian organisations beside the MoH: number of functional basic health units supported by humanitarian organisation/10 000 population. Interpretation: This indicator is a snapshot of the situation at a given point in time. At the pre-crisis phase, this indicator indicates the baseline availability of functional health facilities. In the early phase after a crisis occurs, this indicator will show the consequences of the crisis (decrease/reduction in availability of health facilities) when compared to pre-crisis and the needs in terms of support to health facilities. At later stages of crisis, trends in this indicator will allow to monitor the response in supporting health facilities. Limitation: this indicator measures the availability of health facilities but does not measure access to the facilities by the population nor the quality of service provided. It is therefore only a proxy for coverage.Census of health facilities, administrative boundaries, health areas boundaries, population per administrative areas,and population per health areas should be available for crisis-prone countries, possibly as part of the COD/FOD, as a prepardness instrument; the indicator itself could be available pre-crisis.Further guidance: Monitoring the building blocks of the health system (http://www.who.int/healthinfo/systems/monitoring/en/index.html)Numerator: census of health facilities; assessment of functionality of health facilities; 3 Ws Denominator: administrative boundaries; health areas boundaries; population per administrative area; population per health area;N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, PM4 Victim Assistance, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, W7 Aggravating Factors
HealthH-A.1.bH1 General clinical services & essential trauma careNumber of functional health centres/50 000 populationProxy indicator of geographical accessibility, and of equity in availability of Health Facilties across different administrative units FacilityThe total population for the same administrative or health area, at the same point in timeThe number of basic health units, i.e. all public and private health facilities, defined as a static facility (a designated building) or mobile clinics in which general health services are offered, in a defined administrative or health area, at a given point in timeAdministrative area; health area; public/private; fixed/mobile; support/no support from humanitarian organisations;YesBaseline, OutputYesSphere: Health systems standard 1: Health service delivery (Key indicator 1)1 Health Centre per 50 000 population Follow-up of trendsThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Calculation: This indicator can be adjusted to measure the support provided by one or several humanitarian organisations beside the MoH: number of health centres supported by humanitarian organisation/50 000 population. Interpretation: This indicator is a snapshot of the situation at a given point in time. At the pre-crisis phase, this indicator indicates the baseline availability of functional health facilities. In the early phase after a crisis occurs, this indicator will show the consequences of the crisis (decrease/reduction in availability of health facilities) when compared to pre-crisis and the needs in terms of support to health facilities. At later stages of crisis, trends in this indicator will allow to monitor the response in supporting health facilities. Limitation: this indicator measures the availability of health facilities but does not measure access to the facilities by the population nor the quality of service provided. It is therefore only a proxy for coverage.Census of health facilities, administrative boundaries, health areas boundaries, population per administrative areas,and population per health areas should be available for crisis-prone countries, possibly as part of the COD/FOD, as a prepardness instrument; the indicator itself could be available pre-crisis.Further guidance: Monitoring the building blocks of the health system (http://www.who.int/healthinfo/systems/monitoring/en/index.html)Numerator: census of health facilities; assessment of functionality of health facilities; 3 Ws Denominator: administrative boundaries; health areas boundaries; population per administrative area; population per health area;F1 Food Assistance, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PM4 Victim Assistance, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, W7 Aggravating Factors
HealthH-A.1.cH1 General clinical services & essential trauma careNumber of functional district-rural hospitals/250 000 populationProxy indicator of geographical accessibility, and of equity in availability of Health Facilties across different administrative units FacilityThe total population for the same administrative or health area, at the same point in timeThe number of district/rural hospitals, i.e. all public and private district-rural hospitals, including field hospitals, in a defined administrative or health area, at a given point in timeAdministrative area; health area; public/private; support/no support from humanitarian organisations;YesBaseline, OutputYesSphere: Health systems standard 1: Health service delivery (Key indicator 1)1 Rural/District Hospital per 250 000 population Follow-up of trendsThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Calculation: This indicator can be adjusted to measure the support provided by one or several humanitarian organisations beside the MoH: number of functional rural/district hospitals supported by humanitarian organisation/250 000 population. Interpretation: This indicator is a snapshot of the situation at a given point in time. At the pre-crisis phase, this indicator indicates the baseline availability of functional health facilities. In the early phase after a crisis occurs, this indicator will show the needs in terms of support to health facilities and the consequences of the crisis (decrease/reduction in availability of health facilities) when compared to pre-crisis. At later stages of crisis, trends in this indicator will allow to monitor the response in supporting health facilities. Limitation: this indicator measures the availability of health facilities but does not measure access to the facilities by the population nor the quality of service provided. It is therefore only a proxy for coverage.Census of health facilities, administrative boundaries, health areas boundaries, population per administrative areas,and population per health areas should be available for crisis-prone countries, possibly as part of the COD/FOD, as a prepardness instrument; the indicator itself could be available pre-crisis.Further guidance: Monitoring the building blocks of the health system (http://www.who.int/healthinfo/systems/monitoring/en/index.html)Numerator: census of health facilities; assessment of functionality of health facilities; 3 Ws Denominator: administrative boundaries; health areas boundaries; population per administrative area; population per health area;F1 Food Assistance, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG4 Advocacy, awareness, education with affected populations, local authorities, international community, PM4 Victim Assistance, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, W7 Aggravating Factors
HealthH-A.2H4.2 Maternal and newborn careNumber of functional health facilities with Comprehensive Emergency Obstetric Care (CEmOC) per 500,000 populationProxy indicator for the physical availability and geographical accessibility of emergency obstetric services and their distribution across districts in the affected areas. An unbalance between the availability of BEmOC and CEmOC (with too few BEmOC) is often observed. FacilityThe total population for the same administrative or health area, at the same point in timeNumber of functional health facilities, i.e. all public and private health facilities, with Comprehensive Emergency Obstetric Care in a defined administrative or health area at a certain point in timeAdministrative area; health area; public/private; support/no support from humanitarian organisationsYesBaseline, OutputYesSphere: Essential health services – sexual and reproductive health standard 1: Reproductive health (Key indicator 4)>= 1 health facilities with Comprehensive Emergency Obstetric Care/ 500,000 population; Follow-up of trendsThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Calculation: CEmOC includes BEmOC plus caesarian sesction plus safe blood transfusion available 24 hours and 7 days Interpretation: This indicator is a snapshot of the situation at a certain period of time. At the pre-crisis phase, this indicator will indicate the baseline availability of health services. In the early phase after a crisis occurs, this indicator will show the consequences of the crisis (decrease/reduction in availability of health services) when compared to pre-crisis and the needs in term of support to health facilities. At later stages of crisis, trends in this indicator will allow to monitor the response in supporting health services. Limitation: this indicator measures the availability of health services but does not measure access to the service by the popualtion nor the quality of service and is therefore only a proxy for coverage. Quality of services (including trained staff and adequate supplies) should be further appraised.Census of health facilities and assessment of service availability should be available pre-crisis through the realisation of SARA or HeRAMS.Further guidance: Monitoring Emergency Obstetric Care (http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/monitoring/9789241547734/en/) Numerator: census of health facilities; assessment of functionality of health facilities; assessment of service availability (eg SARA, HeRAMS); Denominator: administrative boundaries; health areas boundaries; population per administrative area; population per health area;N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, P1 (PC) Child Protection, (R) Early Recovery, W7 Aggravating Factors
HealthH-A.2aH4.2 Maternal and newborn careNumber of functional health facility with Basic Emergency Obstetric Care (BEmOC) per 500,000 populationProxy indicator for the physical availability and geographical accessibility of emergency obstetric services and their distribution across districts. An unbalance between the availability of BEmOC and CEmOC (with too few BEmOC) is often observed. FacilityThe total population for the same administrative or health area, at the same point in time Number of functional health facilities, i.e. all public and private health facilities, with Basic Emergency Obstetric Care in a defined administrative or health area at a certain point in time Administrative area; health area; public/private; support/no support from humanitarian organisations YesBaseline, OutputYesSphere: Essential health services – sexual and reproductive health standard 1: Reproductive health (Key indicator 3)>= 4 health facilities with Basic Emergency Obstetric Care/ 500,000 population Follow-up of trends There is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc... Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Calculation: BEmOC includes parenteral antibiotics, oxytocic/anticonvulsant drugs, manual removal of placenta, removal of retained products with manual vacuum aspiration (MVA), assisted vaginal delivery available 24 hours and 7 days Interpretation: This indicator is a snapshot of the situation at a certain period of time. At the pre-crisis phase, this indicator will indicate the baseline availability of health services. In the early phase after a crisis occurs, this indicator will show the consequences of the crisis (decrease/reduction in availability of health services) when compared to pre-crisis and the needs in term of support to health facilities. At later stages of crisis, trends in this indicator will allow to monitor the response in supporting health services. Limitation: this indicator measures the availability of health services but does not measure access to the service by the popualtion nor the quality of service and is therefore only a proxy for coverage. Quality of services (including trained staff and adequate supplies) should be further appraised. Census of health facilities and assessment of service availability should be available pre-crisis through the realisation of SARA or HeRAMS. "Further guidance: Monitoring Emergency Obstetric Care (http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/monitoring/9789241547734/en/) " Numerator: census of health facilities; assessment of functionality of health facilities; assessment of service availability (eg SARA, HeRAMS); Denominator: administrative boundaries; health areas boundaries; population per administrative area; population per health area; N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, P1 (PC) Child Protection, (R) Early Recovery, W7 Aggravating Factors
HealthH-A.5H1 General clinical services & essential trauma careNumber of inpatient beds per 10,000 populationIndicator for the availability of hospital beds across crisis areas and proxy indicator of equity in the allocation of resources. BedThe total population for the same administrative or health area, at the same point in timeNumber of inpatient beds in functional health facilities, i.e. all public and private health facilities, in a defined administrative or health area at a given point in timeAdministrative area; health area; public/private; support/no support from humanitarian organisations;YesBaseline, OutputYesSphere: Health systems standard 1: Health service delivery (Key indicator 1)>10 inpatient beds per 10 000 population Follow-up of trendsThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Calculation: this includes total hospital beds (for long-term and acute care), maternity beds and paediatric beds, but not delivery beds. Interpretation: This indicator is a snapshot of the situation at a certain period of time. At the pre-crisis phase, this indicator will indicate the baseline availability of health services. In the early phase after a crisis occurs, this indicator will show the consequences of the crisis (decrease/reduction in availability of health services) when compared to pre-crisis and the needs in term of support to health facilities. At later stages of crisis, trends in this indicator will allow to monitor the response in supporting health services. Limitation: this indicator measures the availability of inpatient beds but does not measure access by the popualtion.Number of inpatient beds, administrative boundaries, health areas boundaries, population per administrative areas and population per health areas should be available for crisis-prone countries, possibly as part of the COD/FOD, as a prepardness instrumentFurther guidance: Monitoring the building blocks of the health system (http://www.who.int/healthinfo/systems/monitoring/en/index.html)Numerator: health statistics; assessment of service availability (eg SARA, HeRAMS); Denominator: administrative boundaries; health areas boundaries; population per administrative area; population per health area;C2 Population information management, C2.3 Service Provision, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.10 Service Provision - Health, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PM4 Victim Assistance, (R) Early Recovery
HealthH-A.6H4.3 Sexual violencePercentage of functional health facilities with clinical management of rape survivor servicesKey indicator to measure the allocation of resources and the availability of services to address consequences of sexual violence. FacilityTotal number of functional health facilities in the same administrative or health area at the same point in timeNumber of functional health facilities, i.e. all public and private health facilities, with clinical management of rape survivors in a defined administrative or health area at a certain point in timeAdministrative area; health area; public/private; support/no support from humanitarian organisationsYesBaseline, OutputYesSphere: Essential health services – sexual and reproductive health standard 1: Reproductive health (Key indicator 1)100% of health facilities with clinical management of rape survivor services Follow-up of trendsThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Calculation: should include clinical management of rape survivor plus contraception and PEP as a target. However countries must define which elements of this package are in place to define the locally appropriate monitoring package. Interpretation: This indicator is a snapshot of the situation at a certain period of time. At the pre-crisis phase, this indicator will indicate the baseline availability of health services. In the early phase after a crisis occurs, this indicator will show the consequences of the crisis (decrease/reduction in availability of health services) when compared to pre-crisis and the needs in term of support to health facilities. At later stages of crisis, trends in this indicator will allow to monitor the response in supporting health services. Limitation: this indicator measures the availability of health services but does not measure access to the service by the popualtion nor the quality of service and is therefore only a proxy for coverage. Quality of services (including trained staff and adequate supplies) should be further appraised.Census of health facilities and assessment of service availability should be available pre-crisis through the realisation of SARA or HeRAMS.Numerator: assessment of service availability (eg SARA, HeRAMS); Denominator: census of health facilities; assessment of functionality of health facilities;PC3 Sexual violence, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PG4 Advocacy, awareness, education with affected populations, local authorities, international community, PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, PG6 Prevention Programming, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery
HealthH-A.7H1 General clinical services & essential trauma careNumber of health workers per 10,000 populationKey indicator to monitor the availability of health workers. It can serve as a proxy to monitor equity in the allocation of resources by humanitarian actors across different groups within the humanitarian case load and/or crisis affected population versus local populations. IndividualThe total population for the same geographical or health area at a certain point in timeTotal number of health workers (medical doctor + nurse + midwife) in a defined administrative or health area at a certain point in timeAdministrative area; health area; sex of health workers; level of health workers (medical doctor, nurse, midwife); support/no support from humanitarian organisations;YesBaseline, OutputYesSphere: Health systems standard 2: Human resources (Key indicator 1)> 22 health workers per 10 000 population Follow-up of trendsThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Calculation: health workers include medical doctors, nurses and midwifes Interpretation: This indicator is a snapshot of the situation at a certain period of time. At the pre-crisis phase, this indicator will indicate the baseline availability of work force. In the early phase after a crisis occurs, this indicator will show the consequences of the crisis (decrease/reduction in work force reporting to the facilities) when compared to pre-crisis and the needs in term of support. At later stages of crisis, trends in this indicator will allow to monitor the response in supporting health services. There is no consensus about optimal level of health workers for a population. Limitation: this indicator measures the availability of work force but does not measure the competencies of the work force. Competencies should be further appraised.Number of health workers, administrative boundaries, health areas boundaries, population per administrative areas and population per health areas should be available for crisis-prone countries, possibly as part of the COD/FOD, as a prepardness instrumentFurther guidance: Monitoring the building blocks of the health system (http://www.who.int/healthinfo/systems/monitoring/en/index.html)Numerator: health statistics; assessment of service availability (eg SARA, HeRAMS); Denominator: administrative boundaries; health areas boundaries; population per administrative area; population per health area;C2 Population information management, C2.3 Service Provision, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.10 Service Provision - Health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, PM4 Victim Assistance, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, W7 Aggravating Factors
HealthH-A.8H1 General clinical services & essential trauma careNumber of Community Health Workers per 10,000 populationIndicator monitoring the availability of human resources key to delivering community-based intervention. IndividualThe total population for the same administrative or health area at the same point in timeTotal number of community health workers in crisis affected areas in a defined administrative or health area at a given point in timeAdministrative Area; health area; sex of community health workers; support/no support from humanitarian organisations;YesBaseline, OutputYesSphere: Health systems standard 2: Human resources (Key indicator 1)>=10 community health workers per 10 000 population Follow-up of trendsThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Interpretation: This indicator is a snapshot of the situation at a certain period of time. At the pre-crisis phase, this indicator will indicate the baseline availability of work force. In the early phase after a crisis occurs, this indicator will show the consequences of the crisis (decrease/reduction in work force reporting to the facilities) when compared to pre-crisis and the needs in term of support. At later stages of crisis, trends in this indicator will allow to monitor the response in supporting health services. Limitation: this indicator measures the availability of work force but does not measure the competencies of the work force. Competencies should be further appraised.Number of health workers, administrative boundaries, health areas boundaries, population per administrative areas and population per health areas should be available for crisis-prone countries, possibly as part of the COD/FOD, as a prepardness instrumentFurther guidance: Monitoring the building blocks of the health system (http://www.who.int/healthinfo/systems/monitoring/en/index.html)Numerator: health statistics; assessment of service availability (eg SARA, HeRAMS); Denominator: administrative boundaries; health areas boundaries; population per administrative area; population per health areas;C2 Population information management, C2.3 Service Provision, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.10 Service Provision - Health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, PM4 Victim Assistance, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, W7 Aggravating Factors
HealthH-A.9H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H3 Communicable diseases, H4 Sexual and Reproductive HealthNumber and percentage of functional health facilities providing selected relevant servicesProxy indicator for the physical availability and geographical accessibility of selected services relevant to the local context. FacilityThe total population for the same administrative or health area, at the same point in timeThe number of basic health units, i.e. all public and private health facilities, defined as a static facility (a designated building) or mobile clinics in which general health services are offered, in a defined administrative or health area, at a given point in timeadministrative area; health area; health services; support/no support from humanitarian organisations;YesBaseline, OutputYesSphere: Health systems standardsDepending on services and country; Follow-up of trendsThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Calculation: relevant services and package of services should be chosen according to the local context. Interpretation: This indicator is a snapshot of the situation at a certain period of time. At the pre-crisis phase, this indicator will indicate the baseline availability of health services. In the early phase after a crisis occurs, this indicator will show the consequences of the crisis (decrease/reduction in availability of health services) when compared to pre-crisis and the needs in term of support to health facilities. At later stages of crisis, trends in this indicator will allow to monitor the response in supporting health services. Limitation: this indicator measures the availability of health services but does not measure access to the service by the popualtion nor the quality of service and is therefore only a proxy for coverage. Quality of services (including trained staff and adequate supplies) should be further appraised.Census of health facilities and assessment of service availability should be available pre-crisis through the realisation of SARA or HeRAMS.Health Resource Availability Mapping System HeRAMS (http://www.who.int/hac/global_health_cluster/guide/tools/en/)Numerator: assessment of service availability (e.g. SARA, HeRAMS); Denominator: census of health facilities; assessment of functionality of health facilities;C2 Population information management, C2.3 Service Provision, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.10 Service Provision - Health, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, F1 Food Assistance, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, PG6 Prevention Programming, PM4 Victim Assistance, (R) Early Recovery, W7 Aggravating Factors
HealthH-A.9aH1 General clinical services & essential trauma careNumber and Percentage of non functional health facilitiesIndicator of the consequence of the crisis on the availability of the health services FacilityNumber of health facilities in the same administrative or health area at the same point in time Number of non-functional health facilities in a defined administrative or health area at a given point in time administrative area; health area; type of health facilities, i.e. basic health units, health centres, rural/district hospitals YesBaseline, OutputYesFollow-up of trends There is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc... Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Calculation: A facility is considered non-functional when health care activities cannot take place e.g. because of destruction of building, absence of personnel or no supplies. If some activities can be conducted, even partially and/or non-optimally, the structure is considered functional. Interpretation: This indicator is a snapshot of the situation at a given point in time. In the early phase after a crisis occurs, this indicator will show the consequences of the crisis (decrease/reduction in availability of health facilities) when compared to pre-crisis and the needs in terms of support to health facilities. At later stages of crisis, trends in this indicator will allow to monitor the response in supporting health facilities. Census of health facilities should be available for crisis-prone countries, possibly as part of the COD/FOD, as a prepardness instrument Numerator: assessment of functionality of health facilities Denominator: census of health facilities N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PM4 Victim Assistance, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, W7 Aggravating Factors
HealthH-A.9bH1 General clinical services & essential trauma careNumber and Percentage of health facilities supported by humanitarian organisationsIndicator of support by health cluster partners beside MoH to the health system; in very disrupted health system can be a proxy for functional health facilities/services as non-supported health facilities have stopped functioningFacilityNumber of health facilities supported by stakeholders other than MoH in a defined administrative or health area at a given point in time Number of health facilities in the same administrative or health area at a given point in time administrative area; health area; type of health facilities, i.e. basic health units, health centres, rural/district hospitals YesBaseline, OutputYesFollow-up of trends There is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc... Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4"Calculation: only sustained comprehensive support should be included, e.g. staffing support to run/manage the facility; one-off medicine supplies or equipment, for example, should not be included. Support should be further measured, wherever possible, against established needs as explained under A.1.a and A.1.b Interpretation: this indicator can be used to assess gaps and overlaps in the health response" Census of health facilities should be available for crisis-prone countries, possibly as part of the COD/FOD, as a prepardness instrument Health Resource Availability Mapping System HeRAMS (http://www.who.int/hac/global_health_cluster/guide/tools/en/) Numerator: 3 Ws , Denominator: census of health facilities N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P1 (PC) Child Protection, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for Survivors, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PM4 Victim Assistance, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, W7 Aggravating Factors
HealthH-C.1H1 General clinical services & essential trauma careNumber of outpatient consultations per person per year (attendance rate or consultation rate)Proxy indicator for accessibility and utilization of health services that may reflect the quality of services. It does not measure the coverage of this service, but the average number of visits in a defined population. IndividualThe total population for the same administrative or health areaThe number of visits to health facilities, i.e. all public and private health facilities and mobile clinics, for ambulant care in a defined administrative or health area during a yearAdministrative area; health area; age; sex; support/no support from humanitarian organisations;YesBaseline, OutputYesSphere: Health Action chapter, Appendix 3: Formula for calculating Health Facility Utilisation Rate, Sphere: Health systems standard 1: Health service delivery (Key indicator 2)> = 1 new visit/person per year Follow-up of trendsThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Calculation: The numerator is defined as the number of visits to health facilities for ambulant care, not including immunization (can be divided into children under five years of age and aged five years and over); The attendance rate is usually calculated annualy. It can be used, nevertheless, to monitor the monthly evolution. In that case, the denominator (target population) should be divided by 12 for keeping the same unit. Interpretation: the patient volumes at outpatient facilities are not a coverage indicator because the population in need is not well defined. Low rates, however, are indicative of poor availability and quality of services. For example, several countries have demonstrated that outpatient department rates go up when constraints to using health services are removed, such as by bringing services closer to the people or reducing user fees. In contrast, once rates exceed a certain threshold the number of visits is no longer an indicator of the strength of the health services.Further guidance: Monitoring the building blocks of the health (http://www.who.int/healthinfo/systems/monitoring/en/index.html)Numerator: routine health facility reporting system; Denominator: administrative boundaries; health areas boundaries; population per administrative area; population per health areas;N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, PM4 Victim Assistance, P7 Documentation, W7 Aggravating Factors
HealthH-C.2H1 General clinical services & essential trauma careNumber of consultations per clinician per dayMeasure for the workload and proxy indicator of the quality of care. IndividualNumber of full-time equivalent clinicians in the outpatient departement in the same health facility x number of working days in the same health facility in period of analysisNumber of outpatient consultations in a given health facility during a given period of timeYesBaseline, OutputYesSphere: Health Action chapter, Appendix 3: Formula for calculating the Number of Consultatinos per Clinician per Day, Sphere: Health systems standard 2: Human resources (Key indicator 3)< 50 consultations per clinician per day Follow-up of trendsThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Calculation: Numerator: outpatient consultations include new and repeated cases; denominator: a clinician is a health care practitioner that works as a primary care giver in outpatient department. This can include physicians, midwives, nurses and paramedics.Numerator: routine health facility reporting system Denominator: health statisticsN1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practices, PC3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, PM4 Victim Assistance, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, W7 Aggravating Factors
HealthH-C.3H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, H6 Environmental HealthCoverage of measles vaccination (%)Measles coverage refers to the percentage of children who have received at least one dose of measles-containing vaccine in a given year. This indicator is used for estimating the vaccine coverage of the total EPI strategy. To avoid overestimation, measles vaccination coverage is often used as a proxy since it is usually lower than DPT3 coverage. IndividualEstimated total number of children in the target age group in the same administrative or health area in the same period of timeNumber of children in the target age group who received measles vaccination in a defined administrative or health area in a given period of timeAdministrative area; health area; sexYesBaseline, OutputYesSphere: Essential health services – child health standard 1: Prevention of vaccine-preventable diseases (Sphere: 95% irrespective of location)> 95% in camps or urban areas; > 90% in rural areas Follow-up of trendsThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc... Periodical household vaccination coverage surveys should be considered, particularly following a campaign. Households surveys will be more doable in later phases of the emergency.Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Calculation: Measles vaccination coverage can be estimated after a mass vaccination campaign and for EPI; target age group should be determined according to local circumstances. Limitations: The coverage estimates calculated using the administrative method can be biased due to inaccurate numerators or denominators. Numerators may be underestimated (due to incomplete reporting from reporting units or non-inclusion of other vaccinating sources (e.g. private sector, non-governmental organizations), or overestimated (due to over-reporting from reporting units e.g. inclusion of other target groups) Denominator inaccuracies may be due to issues such as: population movement, inaccurate census estimations or projections and/or numerous sources of denominator data Alternatively, vaccination coverage can be estimated by household surveys, where the numerator will be the number of children in a given age range vaccinated and the denominator will be the total number of children in the same age range in the survey.Further guidance: Immunisation coverage (http://www.who.int/healthinfo/systems/WHO_MBHSS_2010_full_web.pdf)Numerator: routine health facility reporting system Denominator: administrative boundaries; health areas boundaries; population per administrative area; population per health areas; Alternatively numerator and denominator can be recorded through household surveysN1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P1 (PC) Child Protection, (R) Early Recovery
HealthH-C.4H2 Child healthcoverage of DTP3 in < 1 year old (%)Indicators used for estimating the vaccine coverage of the total EPI strategy. To avoid overestimation, measles vaccination coverage is often used as a proxy since it is usually lower than DTP3 coverage. IndividualEstimated number of infants (under 12 months of age) in the same yearNumber of infants (under 12 months of age) who received DTP3 in a given yearAdministrative area; health area; sexYesBaseline, OutputYesSphere: Essential health services – child health standard 1: Prevention of vaccine-preventable diseases (Key indicator 2) Sphere: 90%>95% Follow-up of trendsThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc... Periodical household vaccination coverage surveys should be considered, particularly following a campaign. Households surveys will be more doable in later phases of the emergency.Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Calculation: DTP3 coverage refers to the percentage of one-year-olds who have received three doses of the combined diphtheria, tetanus toxoid and pertussis vaccine in a given year; Limitations: The coverage estimates calculated using the administrative method can be biased due to inaccurate numerators or denominators. Numerators may be underestimated (due to incomplete reporting from reporting units or non-inclusion of other vaccinating sources (e.g. private sector, non-governmental organizations), or overestimated (due to over-reporting from reporting units e.g. inclusion of other target groups) Denominator inaccuracies may be due to issues such as: population movement, inaccurate census estimations or projections and/or numerous sources of denominator data Alternatively, vaccination coverage can be estimated by household surveys, where the numerator will be the number of children in a given age range vaccinated and the denominator will be the total number of children in the same age range in the survey.Further guidance: Immunisation coverage (http://www.who.int/healthinfo/systems/WHO_MBHSS_2010_full_web.pdf)Numerator: routine health facility reporting system Denominator: administrative boundaries; health areas boundaries; population per administrative area; population per health areas; Alternatively numerator and denominator can be recorded through household surveysN1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P1 (PC) Child Protection, (R) Early Recovery
HealthH-C.5H4.2 Maternal and newborn carePercentage of births assisted by a skilled attendantProxy measure for the utilization rate of obstetrics services in health facilities and in communities where Village-Trained Midwives are operating. It is a measure of a health system?s ability to provide adequate care for pregnant women during labour and delivery. IndividualEstimated total number of births in the same administrative or health area in the same period of timeNumber of births in a defined administrative or health area in a given period of timeAdministrative area; health areaYesBaseline, OutputYes>90% Follow-up of trendsThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc... Periodical household surveys should be considered. Households surveys will be more doable in later phases of the emergency.Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Calculation: Numerator: A skilled birth attendant is an accredited health professional ? such as a midwife, doctor or nurse ? who has been educated and trained to proficiency in the skills needed to manage normal (uncomplicated) pregnancies, childbirth and the immediate postnatal period, and in the identification, management and referral of complications in women and newborns. Traditional birth attendants, trained or not, are excluded from the category of skilled attendant at delivery. Denominator should be calculated by using the fertility rate by age class and region (e.g. obtained via demographic and health surveys). In Sub-Saharan Africa, for instance, the expected proportion of births is between 4 and 5 % of the total population. Alternatively, percentage of births assisted by a skilled attendant can be assessed through household surveys where the numerator is the number of reported deliveries over a certain period of time assisted by a skilled attendant and the denominator is the reported number of births over the same period of time. Interpretation: This indicator can serve as a proxy for monitoring progress in the health response. Limitations: the indicator may not sufficiently capture women?s access to high quality care, particularly when complications arise. It also does not provide information on availability of any supplies and equipment a skilled attendant may need. Both administrative and household survey methods have limitations. The calculation of the number of births from administrative population number and fertility rates can be very imprecise. Reporting bias in houshold surveys can lead to imprecision in the estimate.Further guidance: monitoring maternal and newborn child health (http://www.who.int/healthmetrics/news/monitoring_maternal_newborn_child_health.pdf) Numerator: routine health facility reporting system Denominator: administrative boundaries; health areas boundaries; population per administrative area; population per health areas; fertility rate (from DHS, for example) Alternatively numerator and denominator can be recorded through household surveysN2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, P1 (PC) Child Protection, (R) Early Recovery, W7 Aggravating Factors
HealthH-C.6H4.2 Maternal and newborn carePercentage of deliveries by caesarean sectionThe proportion of all deliveries by caesarean section in a geographical area is a measure of access to and use of a common obstetric interventions for averting maternal and neonatal deaths and for preventing complications such as obstetric fistula. Of all the procedures used to treat major obstetric complications, caesarean section is one of the commonest, and reporting is relatively reliable. IndividualEstimated total number of births in the same administrative or health area in the same period of timeNumber of births by Caesarean section in a defined administrative or health area in a given period of timeAdministrative area; health area;YesBaseline, OutputYesSphere: Essential health services – sexual and reproductive health standard 1: Reproductive health (Key indicator 5)>=5% and <=15% of deliveries by ceasarian section Follow-up of trendsThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc... Periodical household surveys should be considered. Households surveys will be more doable in later phases of the emergency.Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Calculation: Denominator should be calculated by using the fertility rate by age class and region (e.g. obtained via demographic and health surveys). In Sub-Saharan Africa, for instance, the expected proportion of births is between 4 and 5 % of the total population. Alternatively, percentage of deliveries by Caesarean section can be assessed through household surveys where the numerator is the number of reported deliveries by Caesarian section over a certain period of time and the denominator is the reported number of births over the same period of time. Interpretation: This indicator can serve as a proxy for monitoring progress in the health response. Limitations: Both administrative and household survey methods have limitations. The calculation of the number of births from administrative population number and fertility rates can be very imprecise. Reporting bias in houshold surveys can lead to imprecision in the estimate.Further guidance: Monitoring Emergency Obstetric Care (http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/monitoring/9789241547734/en/) Numerator: routine health faicility reporting system; Denominator: administrative boundaries; health areas boundaries; population per administrative area; population per health areas; fertility rate (from DHS, for example) Alternatively numerator and denominator can be recorded through household surveysN2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, P1 (PC) Child Protection, (R) Early Recovery, W7 Aggravating Factors
HealthH-R.1H3 Communicable diseases, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental healthIncidence for selected diseases relevant to the local contextUseful measure of the burden of diseases and detect outbreaks. The list of diseases is context specific and can include communicable and non-communicable diseases. IndividualTotal population in the same administrative or health area and at the same time periodNumber of cases of selected disease in a defined administrative or health area in a given period of timeAdministrative area; health area; age (usually < 5 years; >= 5 years)YesBaselineYesThresholds for alert/outbreak depending on disease Follow-up of trendsThere is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc...Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Calculation: incidence rate, i.e. number of cases per pers per time period, should be calculated, especially when large population movement occurs; however, in many settings, accurate calculation of incidence is severely limited by inaccurate population data, and total number of cases seen should be used instead. Proportional morbidity (cases of disease divided by total cases and expressed as a percentage) is also useful when the population denominators are unknown or changing. Interpretation: can be used both for detection of outbreaks and for monitoring of the effect of the health response. Limitations: Health facility surveillance may have low sensitivity for conditions that do not commonly go to clinic. Access to health services is another factor.Further guidance: Outbreak surveillance and response in humanitarian emergencies (http://whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/2012/WHO_HSE_GAR_DCE_2012_1_eng.pdf)Numerator: EWARS, health facility based surveillance, routine health facility reporting system Denominator: administrative boundaries; health areas boundaries; population per administrative area; population per health areas;N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, (R) Early Recovery, S1 Shelter, S2 Shelter-related NFI, W7 Aggravating Factors
HealthH-R.3H3 Communicable diseases, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental healthCase Fatality Ratio (CFR) for most common diseasesProbability of dying as a result of a given disease. Is a result of a mixture of disease severity and quality of health care.IndividualTotal number of cases related to the disease in the same administrative or health area and the same time period Total number of fatalities related to the disease in a defined administrative or health area in a given time period Administrative area; health area; sex YesBaselineYesSphere: Essential health services – control of communicable diseases standard 3: Outbreak detection and response (Key indicator 4)Cholera : 1 per cent or lower; Shigella dysentery : 1 per cent or lower; typhoid : 1 per cent or lower; meningococcal meningitis : varies, 5-15 per cent; malaria : varies, aim for <5 per cent in severely ill malaria patients; measles : varies, 2-21 per cent reported in conflict-affected settings, aim for <5 per cent. Follow-up of trends There is a differing level of quality of data which can be collected at different phases of the emergency depending on the context, eg the data available and the systems for data collection in place before the crisis, the accessibility of the affected areas, the resources on the ground, etc... Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Interpretation: the CFR is an indicator of the quality of case management, late arrival at the facility or severity of disease. Limitations: most likely to be biased upwards because only more severe cases normally go to clinics. Further guidance: IDSR guide CDC Afro. NB: This indicator is relevant to WASH only for certain diseases. (http://www.cdc.gov/globalhealth/dphswd/idsr/pdf/Technical%20Guidelines/IDSR%20Technical%20Guidelines%202nd%20Edition_2010_English.pdf) Numerator: health facility based surveillance; routine health facility reporting system Denominator: health facility based surveillance; routine health facility reporting system N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, (R) Early Recovery, S1 Shelter, S2 Shelter-related NFI, W7 Aggravating Factors
LogisticsL-1L2 WeightWeight of cargo transported/storedMetric Tonnes (MT)n/an/aType of logistics service (Storage or Transport by Mode); Organisation who requested the service; Sector supported; Date(s) of service provision; Location(s)YesOutputYesn/an/aNote: The Logistics cluster does not provide transport and storage services in all countries where the cluster is activated, and even where it does the Logs cluster is not the only, and often not the primary supplier of services for humanitarian actors. Therefore this indicator will only provide a partial picture of total humanitarian logistics in a given country. When the logs cluster uses this indicator in a country, an explanation of the limitations on its usage should also be provided.Logistics Cluster Reports
LogisticsL-2L1 VolumeVolume of cargo transported/storedCubic metres (m3)n/an/aType of logistics service (Storage or Transport by Mode); Organisation who requested the service; Sector supported; Date(s) of service provision; Location(s)YesOutputYesn/an/aNote: The Logistics cluster does not provide transport and storage services in all countries where the cluster is activated, and even where it does the Logs cluster is not the only, and often not the primary supplier of services for humanitarian actors. Therefore this indicator will only provide a partial picture of total humanitarian logistics in a given country. When the logs cluster uses this indicator in a country, an explanation of the limitations on its usage should also be provided.Logistics Cluster Reports
NutritionN-001N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionGlobal acute malnutrition (GAM) Prevalence rate (%) of global acute malnutrition in children 6 to 59 months of age based on presence of bilateral pitting oedema and / or weight-for-height z-score less than -2 standard deviations of the median of the standard population (WHO 2006) IndividualPercentage Total number of children aged 6-59 months surveyedNumber of children aged 6-59 months that meet the criteria for global acute malnutritionGeographical area, age, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Appendix 4: Measuring acute malnutrition, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chapterWHO TRS 854. Severity classification: 5,10, 15%preparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsNote that WFH and MUAC do not measure the same things and are not comparable. Data on the global malnutrition rate should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific discrimination girls or boys might face in accessing nutrition. In case there is an important difference between the percentage of girls and the percentage of boys suffering from malnutrition, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing in equally accessing nutrition, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs that might differently impact on girls' and boys' nutritional well being.Population-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-002N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionAcute malnutrition in infants less than 6 monthsPrevalence rate (%) of global acute malnutrition in infants less than 6 months of age based on presence of bilateral pitting oedema and /or weight-for-height z-score less than -2 standard deviations of the median of the standard population (WHO 2006) IndividualPercentage Total number of children less than 6 months surveyedNumber of infants 0-5 months that meet the criteria for global acute malnutritionGeographical area, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Food security and nutrition chapter, Appendix 4: Measuring acute malnutritionWHO TRS 854. Severity classification: 5,10, 15%preparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsNote that WFH and MUAC do not measure the same things and are not comparable. Data on the acute malnutrition rate should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific discrimination baby girls or baby boys might face in accessing nutrition. In case there is an important difference between the percentage of infant girls and the percentage of infant boys suffering from malnutrition, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs on breastfeeding that might differently impact on baby girls' and baby boys' nutritional well being.Population-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-003N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSevere acute malnutrition (SAM)Prevalence rate (%) of severe acute malnutrition in children 6 to 59 months of age based on presence of bilateral pitting oedema and / or weight-for-height z-score less than -3 standard deviations of the median of the standard population (WHO 2006) IndividualPercentage Total number of children aged 6-59 months surveyedNumber of children aged 6-59 months that meet the criteria for severe acute malnutritionGeographical area, age, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Appendix 4: Measuring acute malnutrition, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chapter, Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutritionNo standard WHO thresholds; this indicator cut-off should be interpreted in consideration of other indicators including morbidity, mortality and proportion of GAM; Reference: WHO child growth standards and the identification of severe acute malnutrition in infants and children. A Joint Statement by the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund, 2009. preparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsNote that WFH and MUAC do not measure the same things and are not comparable. Data on the severe acute malnutrition rate should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific discrimination girls or boys might face in accessing nutrition. In case there is an important difference between the percentage of girls and the percentage of boys suffering from malnutrition, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing in equally accessing nutrition, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs that might differently impact on girls' and boys' nutritional well being.Population-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-004N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSevere acute malnutrition (SAM) in infants 0-5 monthsPrevalence rate (%) of severe acute malnutrition in infants less than 6 months of age based on presence of bilateral pitting oedema and weight-for-height z-score less than -3 standard deviations of the median of the standard population (WHO 2006) IndividualPercentage Total number of children 0-5 months surveyedNumber of infants 0-5 months that meet the criteria for severe acute malnutritionGeographical area, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Appendix 4: Measuring acute malnutrition, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chapterNo standard WHO thresholds; this indicator cut-off should be interpreted in consideration of other indicators including morbidity, mortality and proportion of GAM; Reference: WHO child growth standards and the identification of severe acute malnutrition in infants and children. A Joint Statement by the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund, 2009. preparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsNote that WFH and MUAC do not measure the same things and are not comparable. Data on the severe acute malnutrition rate should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific discrimination baby girls or baby boys might face in accessing nutrition. In case there is an important difference between the percentage of infant girls and the percentage of infant boys suffering from malnutrition, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs on breastfeeding that might differently impact on baby girls' and baby boys' nutritional well being.Population-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-005N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionModerate acute malnutrition (MAM)Prevalence rate (%) of moderate acute malnutrition in children 6 to 59 months of age based on presence of weight-for-height z-score less than -2 and equal or greater than -3 standard deviations of the median of the standard population (WHO 2006) IndividualPercentage Total number of children aged 6-59 months surveyedNumber of children aged 6-59 months that meet the criteria for moderate acute malnutritionGeographical area, age, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Appendix 4: Measuring acute malnutrition, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chapter, Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micro-nutrient deficiencies standard 1: Moderate acute malnutritionNo standard WHO thresholds; this indicator cut-off should be interpreted in consideration of other indicators including morbidity, mortality and proportion of GAMpreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsPrevalence easy to derive by subtracting SAM from GAMNote that WFH and MUAC do not measure the same things and are not comparable. Data on the moderate acute malnutrition rate should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific discrimination girls or boys might face in accessing nutrition. In case there is an important difference between the percentage of girls and the percentage of boys suffering from malnutrition, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing in equally accessing nutrition, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs that might differently impact on girls' and boys' nutritional well being.Population-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-006N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionModerate acute malnutrition (MAM) in infants 0-5 monthsPrevalence rate (%) of moderate acute malnutrition in infants less than 6 months of age based on weight-for-height z-score less than -2 and equal or greater than -3 standard deviations of the median of the standard population (WHO 2006) IndividualPercentage Total number of children less than 6 months surveyedNumber of infants less than 6 months that meet the criteria for moderate acute malnutritionGeographical area, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesNo standard WHO thresholds; this indicator cut-off should be interpreted in consideration of other indicators including morbidity, mortality and proportion of GAMpreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsPrevalence easy to derive by subtracting Proportion of SAM from Proportion of GAMNote that WFH and MUAC do not measure the same things and are not comparable. Data on the moderate acute malnutrition rate should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific discrimination baby girls or baby boys might face in accessing nutrition. In case there is an important difference between the percentage of infant girls and the percentage of infant boys suffering from malnutrition, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs on breastfeeding that might differently impact on baby girls' and baby boys' nutritional well being.Population-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-007N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionChildhood stuntingPrevalence rate (%) of stunting in children 0 to 59 months of age based on height-for-age z-score less than -2 standard deviations of the median of the standard population (WHO 2006) IndividualPercentage Total number of children 0 to 59 months of age surveyedNumber of children 0 to 59 months of age that meet the criteria for stuntingGeographical area, age, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesWHO TRS 854. Severity classification: 20,30,40 %preparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsAim should be to assess stunting in the entire age group 0-59 monthsDisaggregation by sex and age group should be aimed for and results should be analysed. Note: if surveys being undertaken include 0-59 then use this age group - if not - and the survey is including 6-59 then we may use 6-59. Ideally the Proportion of should be adjusted for 0-59 months)Population-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W4 Vector Control, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-008N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionAcute malnutrition based on MUAC and oedemaPrevalence rate (%) of children 6-59 months with MUAC less than 125 mm and/or having bilateral pitting oedema IndividualPercentage Total number of children aged 6-59 months surveyedNumber of children aged 6-59 months that meet the criteria for wasting based on MUACGeographical area, age, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesWHO child growth standards and the identification of severe acute malnutrition in infants and children. A Joint Statement by the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund, 2009. Phase I,II; added to surveys Phase III,IV Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4When possible to use representative surveys, alternatively - rapid nutrition assessment with smaller number of children can give an idea of the situation - but these findings from a rapid nutrition assessment - with small numbers of children need to be treated with caution and should NOT be presented as prevalence but as number of children It is a good practice to disaggregate oedema cases, however there is a concern of accuracy and precisionPopulation surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART) & rapid nutrition assessment F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F5 Market Access, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W4 Vector Control, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-009N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSevere acute malnutrition based on MUAC and oedemaPrevalence rate (%) children 6-59 months with MUAC less than 115 mm and/or having bilateral pitting oedema IndividualPercentage Total number of children aged 6-59 months surveyedNumber of children aged 6-59 months that meet the criteria for severe wasting based on MUACGeographical area, age, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesWHO child growth standards and the identification of severe acute malnutrition in infants and children. A Joint Statement by the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund, 2009. Phase I,II; added to surveys Phase III,IVPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4When possible to use representative surveys, alternatively - rapid nutrition assessment with smaller number of children can give an idea of the situation - but these findings from a rapid nutrition assessment - with small numbers of children need to be treated with caution and should NOT be presented as prevalence but as number of children It is a good practice to disaggregate oedema cases, however there is a concern of accuracy and precision.Population surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART) & rapid nutrition assessment F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F5 Market Access, F7 Utilization, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W4 Vector Control, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-010N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionModerate acute malnutrition based on MUACPrevalence rate (%) children 6-59 months with MUAC less than 125 mm but equal or more than 115 mm IndividualPercentage Total number of children aged 6-59 months surveyedNumber of children aged 6-59 months that meet the criteria for moderate wasting based on MUACGeographical area, age, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Appendix 4: Measuring acute malnutrition, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chapter, Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micro-nutrient deficiencies standard 1: Moderate acute malnutritionPhase I,II; added to surveys Phase III,IVPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4When possible to use representative survey, alternatively - rapid nutrition assessment with smaller number of children can give you a idea of the situation - but these findings from a rapid nutrition assessment - with small numbers of children need to be treated with caution and should NOT be presented as prevalence but as number of children Prevalence easy to derive by subtracting Proportion of severe wasting based on low MUAC from Proportion of wasting based on low MUACPopulation-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F5 Market Access, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W4 Vector Control, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-011N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionAcute malnutrition in Pregnant and Lactating WomenPrevalence rate (%) PLW with MUAC less than 210-230 mm (Note: Countries use a range of different cut-offs depending on resources) IndividualPercentage Total number of Pregnant and Lactating Women with infants below age of 0 to 5 months surveyedNumber of Pregnant and Lactating Women with infants 0-5 months that meet the criteria for acute malnutrition based on MUACGeographical areaYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Appendix 4: Measuring acute malnutrition, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chapterAll phases Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4There are NO agreed international Cut off points for MUAC for PLW so National MUAC cut off points may vary, If available/possible, use representative survey, if not - rapid nutrition assessment with smaller number of PLW can give you some idea of the situationPLW may be a problematic to define and identify, SMART surveys provide data for women with children, so definition of lactating should be mothers with infants 0-5 months; caution on excluding women in first pregnancyPopulation-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART) or rapid nutrition assessment F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W4 Vector Control, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-012N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionStunting in women of reproductive agePrevalence rate (%) of women 15-49 years old who have height less than 145 cm IndividualPercentage Total number of women 15-49 years surveyedNumber of women 15-49 years that meet the criteria for stuntingGeographical areaNoBaseline, OutcomeYespreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsPopulation-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W4 Vector Control, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-013N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionUndernutrition for adultsPrevalence rate (%) of adults aged 19.1 to 59.9 years old with BMI less than 17.00 kg/m2 and/or having bilateral pitting oedema IndividualPercentage Total number of adults aged 19.1 to 59.9 years old surveyedNumber of adults aged 19.1 to 59.9 years old that meet the criteria for undernutritionGeographical area, age, sexNoBaseline, OutcomeYesWHO TRS 854 classification: mild thinness (BMI = 17.00-18.49 kg/m2), moderate thinness (BMI = 16.00-16.99 kg/m2), and severe thinness (BMI < 16.00 kg/m2).Preparatory and phase IV and beyond Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsAnthropometric data should be interpreted with a contextual analysis of the associated nutritional risks for the population using underlying causes. In particular, data on the undernutrition rate should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific discrimination adult women or adult men might face in accessing nutrition. In case there is an important difference between the percentage of women and the percentage of men suffering from undernutrition, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs that might differently impact their nutritional well being.Population-based surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H3 Communicable diseases, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W4 Vector Control, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-014N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionUndernutrition for 5 to 19 year oldsPrevalence rate (%) of children and adolescents 5-19 years of age with Z-scores defined as BMI-for-age index less than -2 standard deviations from the median BMI of a reference population of children/adolescents of the same age and/or having bilateral pitting oedema IndividualPercentage Total number of children and adolescents 5-19 years surveyedNumber of children and adolescents 5-19 years that meet the criteria for undernutritionGeographical area, sexNoBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Appendix 4: Measuring acute malnutrition, SPHERE Food security and nutrition chapterWHO Reference 2007 www.who.int/growthref. Preparatory and phase iv and beyond Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 4Should be based on a methodologically solid anthropometric nutrition survey finding and include Confidence IntervalsParticularly important for adolescent girls. Data on the undernutrition rate should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific discrimination girls, boys, adolescent girls and adolescent boys might face in accessing nutrition. In case there is an important difference between the percentage of girls and the percentage of boys suffering from undernutrition, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs that might differently impact on girls' and boys' nutritional well being. Note: the indicator includes 5.0 to 19.0 years. Based on WHO 2007 reference populationF1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H3 Communicable diseases, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W4 Vector Control, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-015N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionAcute malnutrition for older peoplePrevalence rate (%) of older people with a MUAC below 210mm or having bilateral pitting oedema IndividualPercentage Total number of older people surveyed Number of older people that meet the criteria for acute malnutritionGeographical area, sex: in preparatory, Phase III and IV, disaggregate by severity (<185mm and between 185 and 209mm)YesBaseline, OutcomeYesHelp Age guidelines 2013MUAC >210mm: no malnutrition; MAM: MUAC <210mm SAM: MUAC<185mm or oedema (Help Age guidelines 2013)In preparatory phase as well as phases I and II: use rapid assessment methods In phases III and IV, organize surveys with larger samples or use rapid assessment method, with multi-indicator questionnairePre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Rapid assessment methods can be used at any phase. The questionnaire should include questions about socio-economic status, health, household food security, water and sanitation.In preparatory phase,: Collect baseline demographic data about the percentage of people 50 and above (or 60 and above) disaggregated by sex and by age groups of 5 years (50-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70-74, 75-80, 80 and above) Assess household food security Organize focus group discussions with older people to have an idea of their access to food.older people are defined as "people aged 60 and above" (UN definition), but in some contexts (e.g. Somali, Ethiopia, Sudan etc.), can be 50 and above (as people are considered "old" from this age); Note: Nutritional oedema in older people may be difficult to distinguish from other types of oedema, so suggestion to separate BMI and oedema cases if necessary. Data on acute malnutrition rate should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific discrimination elderly women and elderly men might face in accessing nutrition. In case there is an important difference between the percentage of elderly women and the percentage of elderly men suffering from acute malnutrition, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs as well as on the social and family support networks available to them that might differ, hence impacting differently their nutritional well being.surveys: rapid assessmentsF1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H3 Communicable diseases, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W4 Vector Control, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-016N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionMinimum meal frequency for children 24-59 monthsProportion of children 24-59 months who are eating 3 meals a day or more IndividualPercentage Total number of children 24-59 months surveyedNumber of children 24-59 months who are eating 3 meals a day or moreGeographical area, age, sexNoBaselineNopreparatory; Phase I and II; Phase II and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Use 6-23 months age group indicator as proxy for 24-59 months, and assume older age group is worse off CAN be an important ALERT indicator in early phases of an emergency Indicator used for IYCF for 6-23 month age group based on WHO indicator. surveys; rapid assessments; F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-018N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesMinimum dietary diversity for children 24-59 months Proportion of children 24-59 months who receive foods from 4 or more food groups IndividualPercentage Total number of children 24-59 months surveyedNumber of children 24-59 months who receive from 4 or more of the following food groups.Geographical area, age, sexNoBaselineNoFood Security and Nutrition 4.1.1, Sphere: Food security - food transfers standard 1: General nutrition requirementsNo standard identified, only WHO source indicatorpreparatory; Phase I and II; Phase II and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 4Use 6-23 months age group indicator as proxy for 24-59 months, and assume older age group is worse off - CAN be an important ALERT indicator in early phases of an emergency (WHO uses a parameter of previous 24 hours). Food groups defined as follows: (1) grains, roots and tubers (2) legumes and nuts (3) dairy products (milk, yogurt, cheese) (4) flesh foods (meat, fish, poultry and liver/organ meats) (5) eggs (6) vitamin-A rich fruits and vegetables (7) other fruits and vegetablesIndicator used for IYCF for 6-23 month age group based on WHO indicatorsurveys; rapid assessments; F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-019N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesLevel of risk to common micronutrient deficiencies (high, medium, low)Qualitative assessment of nutritional risk of common micronutrient deficiencies (anaemia, iodine deficiency, vitamin A deficiency (night blindness), scurvy, beri beri, vitamin D deficiency) based on composite indicator analysis on prevalence rates, diet analysis, water quality and diarrheal disease, case finding Communityhigh, medium, lowN/AN/ABy deficiency; geographical area, sex, potentially vulnerable groups: PLW, children 6-59 months, other potentially vulnerable groupsYesBaselineNoSphere: Food security and nutrition, Appendix 5: Measures of the public health significance of micronutrient deficienciesSPHERE 2011, appendix 5 - thresholds (http://www.spherehandbook.org/en/appendix-15/)Preparatory; Phase II, III, IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4List prevalence rates for micronutrient status known for any vitamins and minerals and collect additional information on diet, water quality and disease, to assess the severity of the risk for specific population groupsuse survey data ; estimate from numbers of affected population by type of vulnerable groupsF1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, (R) Early Recovery, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-020N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesVitamin A coverage in children 6--59 monthsProportion of children 6 - 59 months having received vitamin A in previous 6 monthsIndividualPercentageTotal number of children 6-59 months surveyed Number of children 6 - 59 months that received vitamin A in the previous 6 months (mother's recall or card verified)Geographical area, age (6-11, 12-23 months), sex YesBaseline, OutputYesHealth Action 2.2.1, Sphere: Essential health services – child health standard 1: Prevention of vaccine-preventable diseases (Key indicator 1)Target: 95%. Upon completion of measles vaccination campaign at least 95 per cent of children aged 6–59 months have received an appropriate dose of Vitamin Apreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4The indicator applies for children living in settings where VAD is a public health problem, WHO follows the GAVA recommendation and advocates for two doses in the last year. In case there is an important difference, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs that might differently impact on girls' and boys' nutritional well being. Consider the dates of the actual vitamin A supplementation to get an indication of number of children uncovered (0 to 5 months old) and who should be included in the new supplementation programme. population surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART) F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health
NutritionN-021N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesIron supplementation coverage rate in children Proportion of children 6-59 months of age receiving micronutrient supplements that contain adequate iron IndividualPercentage Total number of children 6-59 months surveyedNumber of children 6-59 months who received micronutrient supplements with adequate iron in/with one of their meals the previous dayGeographical area, age (6-24, 24-59 months), sexNoBaseline, OutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 4.1.1, Sphere: Food security and nutrition, Appendix 5: Measures of the public health significance of micronutrient deficienciespreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4population surveys with representative sampling methods (MICS, DHS, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health
NutritionN-022N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesIron-folic acid supplementation in pregnant womenProportion of pregnant women having received iron-folic acid contained supplementation daily in previous 6 months/during pregnancy IndividualPercentage Total number of pregnant women surveyedNumber of pregnant women who bought or received iron-folic acid contained supplementation daily in the previous 6 months during pregnancyGeographical areaYesBaseline, OutputYesSphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 2: basic and skilled support (GN 2), Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micro nutrient deficiencies standard 1: Moderate acute malnutrition (GN 6 and 7)preparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4In some countries iron-folic acid supplements are replaced by multiple micronutrients, therefore depending on the situation the indicator should be changed to "received iron-folic acid supplements "or "received multiple micronutrient supplements"Population survey with representative sampling methods (eg, MICS, DHA, SMART)F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F6 Availability, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-023N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesIodized salt consumption Proportion households using adequately iodized salt in previous 6 months HouseholdsPercentage Total number of households surveyedNumber of households using adequately iodized salt (20-40 ppm) in previous 6 monthsGeographical areaNoBaseline, OutputYesSphere: Food security and nutrition, Appendix 5: Measures of the public health significance of micronutrient deficiencies, Sphere: Food security and nutrition assessment standard 2: NutritionIndicator should be equal to or greater than 90Proportion of(reference?) -Number of households using adequately iodized salt (20-40 ppm) in previous 6 monthspreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Adequately iodized salt is salt containing 15 to 40 ppm of iodine at the household level. Reference: Assessment of iodine deficiency disorders and monitoring their elimination : a guide for programme managers. 3rd edition WHO, 2008Use of "using" rather than "having regularly consumed in previous 6 months" based on recommended assessment methods, which is measuring iodine level in salt in households at a time of assessment and not collecting retrospective data (as the level of iodine in salt consumed cannot be assessed and many people do not know if salt is / was iodized). Alternative formulation: "Proportion of households using adequately iodized salt" - see reference. Apparently not a food security indicator; F1 Food Assistance, F6 Availability, H2 Child health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health
NutritionN-024N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesPrevalence rate of vitamin A deficiency(1)Proportion of children below five years of age with sub-clinical vitamin A deficiency (2) Proportion of women of reproductive age with clinical vitamin A deficiencyIndividualPercentage Total number of children below five years of age surveyed or Total number of women of reproductive age surveyed Number of children below five years of age with vitamin A deficiency (serum retinol values <0.70µmol/l) or Proportion of women of reproductive age or 15-49 years of age) with Vitamin A deficiency (serum retinol values<0.70µmol/l) Geographical area, boys and girls 0-59 months, women of reproductive age YesBaselineNoFood Security and Nutrition 4.1.1Public Health Significance: <2Proportion of normal; 2-9.9Proportion of Low; 10-19.9Proportion of Medium; >20Proportion of High (ref: WHO 1996) Preparatory Pre-crisis/Baseline FOR CHILDREN - Serum or plasma retinol levels measured in capillary or venous samples is an invasive test that is expensive if HPLC is used. Newer methods for dry blood spots with the capillary method are emerging. FOR WOMEN - Information can be ascertained verbally. Since the question is targeted at a specific subset of women, the indicator fails to capture the full range of women of reproductive ages. There is a need to standardize the phrasing of the question. WHO guideline: who.int/vmnis/retinol.pdf primary data - National Surveys, Local studies, DHS, MICS; secondary data - VMNIS F1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health
NutritionN-025N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesPrevalence rate of anaemiaProportion of children below five years of age with Hb concentration of <11 g/dL Proportion of women in reproductive age with Hb concentration of <12 g/dL IndividualPercentage Total number of children below five years of age surveyed or Total number of women of reproductive age surveyedNumber of children below five years of age with Hb concentration of <11 g/dL or Number of women of reproductive age with anaemia (Hb<11g/dl for pregnant women; <12 g/dl for non pregnant women)Geographical areaNoBaseline, OutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 4.1.1Public Health Significance: <4.9Proportion of Normal/Adequate; 5-19.9Proportion of Low; 20-39.9Proportion of Medium; >40Proportion of High (ref: WHO 2001).PreparatoryPre-crisis/BaselineThe finger-prick blood sample test is easy to administer in the field. The test could be easily integrated in regular health or prenatal visit to capture all women in reproductive ages. Cost of equipment may be prohibitiveWHO guideline: who.int/indicators/haemolobin.pdf; primary data - National Surveys, Local studies, DHS, MICS; secondary data - VMNISF1 Food Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health
NutritionN-026N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesPrevalence rate of iodine deficiencyMedian urinary iodine concentration (?g/L) in children aged 6-12 years IndividualPercentage Total number of children aged 6- 12 years surveyed Median urinary iodine concentration (?g/L) in children aged 6-12 years Geographical area, age YesBaselineFood Security and Nutrition 4.1.1, Sphere: Food security and nutrition, Appendix 5: Measures of the public health significance of micronutrient deficienciesFor children under-5, Public Health significance if <100µg/l but I don't know for children 6-12 years of age (ref: WHO, UNICEF, ICCIDD 2007) Preparatory Pre-crisis/BaselineA median urinary iodine concentration in a population of < 100 ?g/l indicates that the iodine intake is insufficient. A non-invasive method of measurement, the cost of spoturine samples tests is affordable. School age children 6-12 years can be easily tested in population-based surveys. WHO guideline: apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/85972/1/WHO_NMH_NHD_EPG_13.1_eng.pdf; According to WHO ideally one should also assess PLW primary data - National Surveys, Local studies; secondary data - VMNIS F1 Food Assistance, F6 Availability, H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health
NutritionN-027N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionChild morbidity Proportion of children 0-59 months whose caregiver reported an illness in the previous 2 weeks IndividualPercentage Total number of children 0 to 59 months of age surveyedNumber of children 0-59 months whose caregiver reported an illness in the previous 2 weeksGeographical areaYesBaselineNoNo thresholdpreparatory; Phase I and II; Phase II and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 4survey dataThis information may be available through the Health Cluster, but nutrition surveys may provide updated representative informationSMART surveys, Disease early warning systemsH1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H3 Communicable diseases, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-028N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionUnder-five mortalityThe rate of death among children below of 5 years of age in the populationIndividualdeath per 10,000 children under 5 years/day Total number of children under 5 years multiple by number of days in time period over 10,000 persons Total number of death in children under 5 years during time period Geographical area YesBaselineNoHealth Action 2.2.1, Sphere: Essential health services standard 1: Prioritizing health services (Key indicator 2 and GNs)See Sphere (http://www.spherehandbook.org/en/essential-health-services-standard-1-prioritising-health-services/) for emergency thresholds for different regions. When the baseline rate is unknown or of doubtful validity, agencies should aim to maintain the U5MR at least below 2.0/10,000/day preparatory; Phases I, II III and IV Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Under-five mortality rate as defined here is strictly speaking not a rate (i.e. the number of deaths divided by the number of population at risk during a certain period of time) but a probability of death derived from a life table and expressed as rate per 1000 live births These data should be taken from Health Cluster or specific mortality surveys, representative surveys, A proxy can be calculated through health facilities and community records in early phases of emergency. Under-five mortality rate measures child survival. It also reflects the social, economic and environmental conditions in which children (and others in society) live, including their health care. Because data on the incidences and prevalence of diseases (morbidity data) frequently are unavailable, mortality rates are often used to identify vulnerable populations. Under-five mortality rate is an MDG indicator Representative survey and or from health facility / community records H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-029N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingEarly initiation of breastfeedingProportion of children 0-23 months who were put to the breast within one hour of birth.IndividualPercentage Total number of women with a live birth in the X years prior to the survey Number of women with a live birth in the X years prior to the survey who put the newborn infant to the breast within one hour of birth Geographical area, sex NoBaselineNoFood Security and Nutrition 4.2.1, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 2: Basic and skilled supportNo standard; < 80Proportion of is generally a priority. Discuss high, medium and low designations as a group For Phases III-IV, an adapted indicator should be used where the same methodology is used but the denominator is infants born since onset of the emergency. (Proportion of children born since the onset of the emergency who were put to the breastfed within one hour of birth). In Phase 1 and 2, the denominator used should be infants born since onset of the emergency. In these phases opportunistic sampling will be necessary, e.g. at facilities providing obstetric services/newborn support. Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4 WHO IYCF core indicator. For preparatory phase, the WHO core indicator should be used as a baseline where the denominator is children born in the last 24 months (Proportion of children born in the last 24 months who were put to the breastfed within one hour of birth). Note: DHS data are based on the three years or five years prior to survey and MICS data are based on the two years prior to survey Preparatory, Phase III and IV: representative IYCF survey. Phase I and II: use key informant interviews and opportunistic sampling to give an ALERT indication H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, (R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-030N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingExclusive breastfeeding under 6 monthsProportion of infants 0-5 months of age who are fed exclusively with breast milk IndividualPercentage Total number of infants 0 to 5 months of age surveyedInfants 0 to 5 months of age who received only breast milk during the previous dayGeographical area, sex, age: 0-1, 2-3, 4-5 months if availableYesBaseline, OutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 4.2.1, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 2: Basic and skilled support (Key Indicator 1)No standard; < 80Proportion of is generally a priority. Discuss high, medium and low designations as a groupFor Phases III and IV, core WHO indicator should be measured. In Phases 1 and 2, it is not possible to accurately assess the exclusive breastfeeding rate in the population. Baseline information and N-40 (not breastfed) will be key information in Phases I and II.Phase 3, Phase 4 WHO IYCF core indicator. For preparatory phase, core WHO indicator should be measuredAttention should be paid on the potential difference in breastfeeding male and female infants. If difference exists, this should inform the nutritional education messages.Preparatory, Phase III and IV: representative IYCF survey. Phase I and II: use key informant interviews and opportunistic sampling to give an ALERT indication H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, (R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-031N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingContinued breastfeeding at one year and at 2 yearsProportion of children 12-15 months of age and 20-23 months of age who are fed breast milk IndividualPercentage Total number of infants 12-15 months of age and total number of infants 20-23 months of age surveyedInfants 12-15 months of age and 20-23 months of age who receive any breast milkGeographical areaNoBaseline, OutcomeYesSPHERE Food security and nutrition chapter, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 2: Basic and skilled support (Key Indicator 1)preparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4The WHO IYCF core indicator reports continued breastfeeding at 1 year. In emergencies, it is important to also monitor continued breastfeeding rate at 2 years (WHO IYCF optional indicator) as children 1-2 years are also at significant risk of increased morbidity and mortality if not breastfed in this context. Attention should be paid on the potential difference in breastfeeding male and female infants. If difference exists, this should inform the nutritional education messages.representative IYCF surveyH2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, (R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-032N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingChildren ever breastfedProportion of children born in the last 24 months who were ever breastfed IndividualPercentage Total number of infants born in the past 23 months in the surveyed areaNumber of infants 0-23 months of age who ever received breast milkGeographical areaYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSPHERE Food security and nutrition chapter, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 2: Basic and skilled supportNo standard; < 80Proportion of is generally a priority. Discuss high, medium and low designations as a groupFor measurement in Phases 1-IV, an adapted indicator should be used where the denominator should be infants born since onset of the emergency. In phases 1 and 2, opportunistic sampling will be necessary, e.g. piggy backed onto reproductive health sampling or anthropometric screening or food security assessment. Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4WHO IYCF core indicator. For preparatory phase, the core WHO Indicator should be used as a baseline where the denominator is infants born in the last 24 months. Preparatory, Phase III and IV: representative IYCF survey. Phase I and II: use key informant interviews and opportunistic sampling to give an ALERT indicationH2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, (R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-033N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingPredominant breastfeeding under 6 monthsProportion of infants 0-5 months of age who are predominantly breastfed IndividualPercentage Total number of infants 0 to 5 months of age surveyedNumber of infants 0-5 months of age who are predominantly breastfedGeographical area, sexNoBaselineNoSPHERE Food security and nutrition chapter, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 2: Basic and skilled supportNo standard; < 80Proportion of is generally a priority. Discuss high, medium and low designations as a grouppreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4 WHO IYCF optional indicatorAttention should be paid on the potential difference in breastfeeding male and female infants. If difference exists, this should inform the nutritional education messages.representative IYCF surveyH2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, (R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-034N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingBottle feedingProportion of children 0-23 months of age who are fed with a bottle IndividualPercentage Total number of infants 0-23 months surveyedNumber of infants 0-23 months who are fed with a bottleGeographical area, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSPHERE Food security and nutrition chapter, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 2: Basic and skilled supportpreparatory; Phases I, II, III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4 WHO IYCF optional indicator. This indicator determines the use of bottles which carry risk; is not an indicator of use of infant formula or breast milk substitutes, since it records any item fed using a bottle including breast milk, water, semi-solids, etc.). Preparatory, Phase III and IV: representative IYCF survey. Phase I and II use key informant interviews and opportunistic sampling to give an ALERT indicationH2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-035N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingMinimum dietary diversityProportion of children 6-23 months of age who receive foods from 4 or more food groups IndividualPercentage Total number of children 6-23 months surveyedNumber of children 6-23 months who receive food from 4 or more food groupsGeographical area, sexNoBaseline, OutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 4.2.2, Sphere: Food security and nutrition assessment standard 1: Food security, Sphere: Food security - food transfers standard 1: General nutrition requirementsNo standard; < 80Proportion of is generally a priority. Discuss high, medium and low designations as a grouppreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4This indicator is adapted from the WHO IYCF core indicator for children 6-23 months. Data should be compared by sex in order to identify any specific limitation girls or boys might face in accessing dietary diversity. In case there is an important difference, the programme should address these gaps by undertaking a gender analysis of the specific challenges the disadvantaged group is facing, including an analysis of the socio cultural habits and beliefs (i.e. food taboos) that might differently impact on girls' and boys' dietary diversity.representative IYCF surveyF3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health
NutritionN-036N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingMinimum meal frequencyProportion of children 6-23 months who received solid, semi-solid or soft foods the minimum number of times or more. IndividualPercentage Total number of children 6-23 months surveyedNumber of children 6-23 months who received solid, semi-solid or soft foods for the minimum number of times or moreGeographical area, sexNoBaseline, OutcomeNoFood Security and Nutrition 4.2.2, Sphere: Food security and nutrition assessment standard 1: Food security, Sphere: Food security - food transfers standard 1: General nutrition requirementsNo standard; < 80Proportion of is generally a priority. Discuss high, medium and low designations as a grouppreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4 WHO IYCF core indicatorrepresentative IYCF surveyF3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health
NutritionN-037N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingMinimum acceptable dietProportion of children 6-23 months of age who receive a minimum acceptable diet (apart from breast milk) IndividualPercentage Total number of children 6-23 months surveyedNumber of children 6-23 months who receive a minimum acceptable dietGeographical area, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 4.2.2, Sphere: Food security and nutrition assessment standard 1: Food security, Sphere: Food security - food transfers standard 1: General nutrition requirementsNo standard; < 80Proportion of is generally a priority. Discuss high, medium and low designations as a grouppreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4 WHO IYCF core indicatorrepresentative IYCF surveyF3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health
NutritionN-038N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingIntroduction of solid, semi-solid or soft food Proportion of children 6-8 months of age who received solid, semi-solid or soft foods during the previous day IndividualPercentage Total number of infants 5-8 months surveyedNumber of infants 5-8 months who received solid, semi-solid or soft foods during the previous dayGeographical area, sexNoBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Food security and nutrition assessment standard 1: Food security, Sphere: Food security - food transfers standard 1: General nutrition requirementsNo standard; < 80Proportion of is generally a priority. Discuss high, medium and low designations as a grouppreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4 WHO IYCF core indicator. Need guidance on sample sizerepresentative IYCF surveyF3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, H2 Child health
NutritionN-039N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingNot breastfedProportion of infants 0<12 months and 12<24 months not breastfed IndividualPercentage Total number of children 0<12 months and 12<24 months surveyedNumber of infants 0-12 months and 12-24 months not breastfedGeographical area; 0-<12 months, 12-<24 months, sexYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSphere: Food security and nutrition assessment standard 1: Food security, Sphere: Food security - food transfers standard 1: General nutrition requirementsCalculate this indicator based on standardized data collected. In phases 1 and 2, an indication of the proportion of non-breastfed infants should be estimated based on key informant interviews and opportunistic sampling.Phase 1, Phase 2This is not a standard indicator. However it is possible to calculate this indicator using standardized data collected to produce WHO IYCF core indicators. Preparatory: calculate this indicator based on standardized data collected. In phases 1 and 11, an indication of the proportion of non-breastfed infants should be estimated based on key informant interviews and opportunistic sampling.Need to raise this with WHO to see how we might develop this as a standard indicator to report in emergency prone contexts.Preparatory, Phases 111 and IV: Indicator produced from data collected from MICS/DHS. Phase I and II will use key informant interviews and opportunistic sampling to give an ALERT indication.H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-040N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingDistribution of infant formula, dried or liquid milk to the affected populationConfirmed distribution of infant formula, dried or liquid milk to the affected population IndividualYes/NoN/AN/AGeographical areaYesBaseline, OutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 4.2.1, Sphere: Food security - food transfers standard 2: Appropriateness and acceptability (Key indicator 3)zero tolerance Phases I,II, III and IV.Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4This is an alert to problems. Any general distribution of these products to the affected population is a concern as there is a risk of spill over to infants and young children.Key informant interviews (include logistics and any agencies involved in distribution, as well as health and nutrition staff and caregivers). Distribution reports. Observations.H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-041N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingInappropriate distribution of infant formula, dried or liquid milk to children 0-<2 yearsConfirmed distribution of infant formula, dried or liquid milk to children 0-< 2 years CommunityYes/NoN/AN/AGeographical areaYesBaseline, OutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 4.2.1, Sphere: Food security - food transfers standard 2: Appropriateness and acceptability (Key indicator 3)zero tolerance Phases I,II,III and IV.Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4This is an alert to problems. Inappropriate distribution is where distribution is not in accordance with the Operational Guidance on IFE in meeting criteria for assessment of need, skilled support available, guaranteed continuity of supplies, individual follow up, availability of storage and preparation facilities, appropriate labelling, and monitoring for spill over to breastfed infants. Key informant interviews (include logistics and any agencies involved in distribution, as well as health and nutrition staff and caregivers). Distribution reports. Observations.H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-042N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition SAM new admissionsNumber of cases with severe acute malnutrition newly admitted for treatment FacilityNumberN/ANumber of cases with severe acute malnutrition newly admitted for treatmentGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5 months, children 6-59 months, people 60 years of age and older, inpatient/outpatient, rural/urban/IDPs YesOutputYesSphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutritionN/APhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4The total number of newly admitted children should be based on the aggregate monthly admissions data.We recognize that PLW with SAM are missing from this disaggregation, however this is work in progress to define case definitions. The reporting period is usually monthly, in major emergencies the reporting can be weekly, bi-weekly. Admission rates should be analysed in order to identify if boys, girls, men, women are equally accessing nutrition services. If a group identified as potentially vulnerable, is not oriented to the nutrition centres, it is important to understand why this is (i.e. gender-based discrimination, mobility restrictions, etc.) and to take required actions.SAM management reportingF1 Food Assistance, H2 Child health, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-043N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition SAM currently treatedNumber of cases with severe acute malnutrition receiving treatment FacilityNumberN/ANumber of cases with severe acute malnutrition receiving treatmentGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5 months, children 6-59 months, people 60 years of age and older, inpatient/outpatient, rural/urban/IDPs YesProcessNoSphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutritionN/APhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4The total number of children admitted will be based on the target set (the estimated burden of malnutrition x the total number of children who can be reached). This can be over a specified time period.We recognize that PLW with SAM are missing from this disaggregation, however this is work in progress to define case definitions. The reporting period is usually monthly, in major emergencies the reporting can be weekly, bi-weekly. Admission rates should be analysed in order to identify if boys, girls, men, women are equally accessing nutrition services. If a group identified as potentially vulnerable, is not oriented to the nutrition centres, it is important to understand why this is (i.e. gender-based discrimination, mobility restrictions, etc.) and to take required actions.SAM management reportingH2 Child health
NutritionN-044N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSAM treatment coverageProportion of cases with severe acute malnutrition receiving treatment FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with severe acute malnutritionNumber of cases with severe acute malnutrition receiving for treatmentGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5 months, children 6-59 months, people 60 years of age and older, inpatient/outpatient, rural/urban/IDPs YesOutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 3.2, Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutrition (Key Indicator 2)Sphere Minimum Standards: >50% for rural; >70% for urban; >90% for IDPs"Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Definitions of different types of coverage are being developed. Admission rates should be analysed in order to identify if boys, girls, men, women are equally accessing nutrition services. If a group identified as potentially vulnerable, is not oriented to the nutrition centres, it is important to understand why this is (i.e. gender-based discrimination, mobility restrictions, etc.) and to take required actions.SQUEAC surveysH2 Child health
NutritionN-045N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSAM discharged diedProportion of cases with severe acute malnutrition who died during treatment FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with severe acute malnutrition dischargedNumber of cases with severe acute malnutrition who died during treatment Geographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5 months, children 6-59 months, people 60 years of age and older, inpatient/outpatient, rural/urban/IDPs YesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 3.2, Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutrition (Key Indicator 3)Sphere Standards: should be less than 10%Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4SAM management reportingH2 Child health
NutritionN-046N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSAM discharged recoveredProportion of discharged cases with severe acute malnutrition who recovered FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with severe acute malnutrition dischargedNumber of discharged cases with severe acute malnutrition who recoveredGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 0-59 months, 6-59 months, people 60 years and older, other groups, inpatient/outpatient YesOutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 3.2, Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutrition (Key Indicator 3)Sphere Standards: should be more than 75%Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4SAM management reporting
NutritionN-047N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSAM discharged defaultedProportion of discharged cases with severe acute malnutrition who defaulted FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with severe acute malnutrition dischargedNumber of discharged cases with severe acute malnutrition who defaultedGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5, children 6-59 months, people 60 years old and older, other groups, confirmed/non-confirmedYesOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 3.2, Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutrition (Key Indicator 3)Sphere Standards: should be less than 15%Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Specify timing for defaulters. Unconfirmed defaulter includes defaulted, moved, died. . If you have capacity to confirm the reason for defaulting, correct the relevant discharged indicatorsSAM management reporting
NutritionN-048N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSAM discharged non-recoveredProportion of discharged cases with severe acute malnutrition who non-recovered FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with severe acute malnutrition dischargedNumber of discharged cases with severe acute malnutrition who non-recoveredGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 0-59 months, 6-59 months, people 60 years and older, other groups, inpatient/outpatient NoOutput, ProcessYesNAPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Specify timing for non-recovery. Non-response to treatment should be identified and acted upon with the full medical investigation.SAM management reportingH2 Child health
NutritionN-049N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSAM referredNumber of cases with severe acute malnutrition referred to inpatient care or hospital FacilityNumberN/ANumber of cases with severe acute malnutrition referred to inpatient care or hospitalGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 6-59 months, people 60 years and older, other groupsNoOutput, ProcessYesNAPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4SAM management reportingH1 General clinical services & essential trauma care
NutritionN-050N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSAM average weight gainAverage weight gain for cases with severe acute malnutrition receiving treatment Facilitygram weight gain per kilogram of body mass per day "Calculating weight gain : The example is for weight gain over 7 days, but the same procedure can be applied to any interval: * subtract from today’s weight (in g) the child’s weight 7 days earlier ; * divide by 7 to determine the average daily weight gain (g/day) ; * divide by the child’s average weight in kg to calculate the weight gain as g/kg/da" "Calculating weight gain : The example is for weight gain over 7 days, but the same procedure can be applied to any interval: * subtract from today’s weight (in g) the child’s weight 7 days earlier ; * divide by 7 to determine the average daily weight gain (g/day) ; * divide by the child’s average weight in kg to calculate the weight gain as g/kg/da" Geographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 6-59 months, people 60 years old and older, other groups NoOutputYesSphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutritionpoor <5 g/kg/d, moderate 5-10 g/kg/d, good >10 g/kg/d Phase III and IV Phase 3, Phase 4Average Daily Weight Gain is calculated on a randomized sample of cured discharges for kwashiorkor and marasmus. A reasonable randomized sample of discharged cured cases is 20. If lower numbers have been discharged cured during the period of reporting, take all discharged cured. See Guidelines for the inpatient treatment of severely malnourished children, WHO 2003 SAM management reporting
NutritionN-051N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSAM average length of stayAverage duration of SAM treatment FacilitydaysNumber of beneficiariesSum of lengths of stay for beneficiaries in therapeutic treatment programme (in days)Geographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 6-59 months, PLW, people 60 years old and older, other groupsNoOutputYesSphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutritionAccording to guidelines in usePhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Average Length Of Stay is calculated on a randomized sample of cured discharges for kwashiorkor and marasmus. A reasonable randomized sample of discharged cured cases is 20. If lower numbers have been discharged cured during the period of reporting, take all discharged cured.Guidelines define limits for the mean length of stay for treatment and are aimed at avoiding prolonged recovery periods. Mean length of stay will differ depending on the guidelines in use and so should be adjusted to national context and guidelines in use. (SPHERE)SAM management reporting
NutritionN-052N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionSAM follow-upProportion of severe acute malnutrition problem cases receiving treatment in need for follow-up at home who are visited at home FacilityPercentageTotal number of severe acute malnutrition problem cases receiving treatment in need for follow-up at homeNumber of severe acute malnutrition problem cases receiving treatment in need for follow-up at home who are visited at homeGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 6-59 months, other groupsNoProcessNoN/APhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4This can be calculated through a coverage survey or using a proxy indicator from the reporting systemExample of SAM problem cases: defaulting, non-response to treatment, refusal referral. Each programme will define which cases are problem ones and should be followed up at home.
NutritionN-053N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionAccess to SAM servicesProportion of the severe acute malnutrition target population living within less than one day's return walk from management of SAM site IndividualPercentageEstimated SAM target population (based on the prevalence of SAM in the area) Number of the severe acute malnutrition target population living within less than one day's return walk from management of severe acute malnutrition site Geographical area, rural/urban, group of beneficiaries: children 6-59 months, other groups NoOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 3.2, Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micro nutrient deficiencies standard 2: Severe acute malnutrition (Key indicator 1)SPHERE: More than 90 per cent of the target population is within less than one day’s return walk (including time for treatment) of the programme site. Phase III and IV Phase 3, Phase 4This can be calculated through a coverage survey or using a proxy indicator from the reporting system Management includes: detection, diagnosis, triage, treatment, follow-up at health facility and/or home for treatment progress, prevention of adverse effects, rehabilitation SQUEAC survey P1 (PC) Child Protection, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-054N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition MAM new admissionsNumber of cases with moderate acute malnutrition newly admitted for treatment FacilityNumberN/ANumber of cases with moderate acute malnutrition newly admitted for treatmentGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5 months, children 6-59 months, PLW, people 60 years of age and older, inpatient/outpatient, rural/urban/IDPs YesOutputYesSphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micro-nutrient deficiencies standard 1: Moderate acute malnutritionN/APhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4MAM management reportingF1 Food Assistance, H2 Child health, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-055N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition MAM currently treatedNumber of cases with moderate acute malnutrition receiving treatment FacilityNumberN/ANumber of cases with moderate acute malnutrition receiving treatmentGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5 months, children 6-59 months, PLW, people 60 years of age and older, inpatient/outpatient, rural/urban/IDPs YesProcessNoSphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micro-nutrient deficiencies standard 1: Moderate acute malnutritionN/APhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4MAM management reporting
NutritionN-056N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionMAM treatment coverageProportion of cases with moderate acute malnutrition receiving treatment FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with moderate acute malnutritionNumber of cases with moderate acute malnutrition receiving for treatmentGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5 months, children 6-59 months, PLW, people 60 years of age and older, inpatient/outpatient, rural/urban/IDPs YesOutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 3.1, Sphere: Management of acute malnutrition and micro nutrient deficiencies standard 1: Moderate acute malnutrition (Key indicator 2)geographical area or impact area: Sphere Minimum Standards: >50% for rural; >70% for urban; >90% for camps"Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4SQUEAC survey
NutritionN-057N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionMAM discharged diedProportion of cases with moderate acute malnutrition who died during treatment FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with moderate acute malnutrition dischargedNumber of cases with moderate acute malnutrition who died during treatmentGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5 months, children 6-59 months, people 60 years of age and older, inpatient/outpatient, rural/urban/IDPs YesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 3.1Sphere Standards: should be less than 3%Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4MAM management reportingH2 Child health
NutritionN-058N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionMAM discharged recoveredProportion of discharged cases with moderate acute malnutrition who recovered FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with moderate acute malnutrition dischargedNumber of discharged cases with moderate acute malnutrition who recoveredGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 0-59 months, 6-59 months, PLW, people 60 years and older, other groups, inpatient/outpatient YesOutcomeYesFood Security and Nutrition 3.1Sphere Standards: should be more than 75%Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4MAM management reporting
NutritionN-059N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionMAM discharged defaultedProportion of discharged cases with moderate acute malnutrition who defaulted FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with moderate acute malnutrition dischargedNumber of discharged cases with moderate acute malnutrition who defaultedGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: infants 0-5, children 6-59 months, PLW, people 60 years old and older, other groups, confirmed/non-confirmedYesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 3.1Sphere Standards: should be less than 15%Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Where possible, it can be useful to break this indicator down to confirmed and non confirmed defaulters as defaulters can mask high death rates if not confirmed. This can be an optional category where capacity to trace defaulters is limited MAM management reporting
NutritionN-060N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionMAM discharged non-recoveredProportion of discharged cases with moderate acute malnutrition who non-recovered FacilityPercentageTotal number of cases with moderate acute malnutrition dischargedNumber of discharged cases with moderate acute malnutrition who non-recoveredGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 0-59 months, 6-59 months, PLW, people 60 years and older, other groups, inpatient/outpatient NoProcessNoPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4MAM management reporting
NutritionN-061N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionMAM referredNumber of cases with moderate acute malnutrition referred for treatment of severe acute malnutrition, to inpatient care or hospital FacilityNumberN/ANumber of cases with moderate acute malnutrition referred to inpatient care or hospitalGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 6-59 months, PLW, people 60 years and older, other groupsNoProcessNoPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4MAM management reportingH1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health
NutritionN-062N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionMAM follow-upProportion of moderate acute malnutrition problem cases receiving treatment in need for follow-up at home who are visited at home FacilityPercentageTotal number of moderate acute malnutrition problem cases receiving treatment in need for follow-up at homeNumber of moderate acute malnutrition problem cases receiving treatment in need for follow-up at home who are visited at homeGeographical area, sex, group of beneficiaries: children 6-59 months, other groupsNoProcessNoPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4This can be calculated through a coverage survey or using a proxy indicator from the reporting systemMAM management reporting and SQUEAC survey
NutritionN-063N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionAccess to MAM servicesProportion of the moderate acute malnutrition target population living within less than one day's return walk from management of MAM site IndividualPercentage Estimated MAM target population (based on the prevalence of MAM in the area) Number of the moderate acute malnutrition target population living within less than one day's return walk from management of moderate acute or malnutrition site Geographical area, rural/urban, group of beneficiaries: children 6-59 months, other groups YesOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 3.1SPHERE: More than 90 per cent of the target population is within less than one day’s return walk (including time for treatment) of the programme site. Phase III and IV Phase 3, Phase 4This can be calculated through a coverage survey or using a proxy indicator from the reporting system MAM management reporting and SQUEAC survey
NutritionN-064N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionBSFPs coverageProportion of target beneficiaries enrolled in blanket supplementary feeding programme IndividualPercentageTotal number of beneficiaries meeting the selection criteria for the blanket supplementary feeding programmeNumber of target beneficiaries meeting the selection criteria for the blanket supplementary feeding programme enrolledGeographical area, rural/urban/IDPs, sex, group of beneficiaries based on national criteriaYesOutputYesN/APhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4The total number of children admitted will be based on the target set (the estimated burden of malnutrition x the total number of children who can be reached). This can be over a specified time period.BSFP management reporting and coverage survey
NutritionN-065N1 Prevention and Management of Acute MalnutritionChildren ScreenedNumber of children screened for acute malnutrition in a community IndividualNumberN/ANumber of children screened for acute malnutrition in a communityGeographical area, sex, rural/urban/IDP, group of beneficiaries: children 6-59 months, PLW, other groupsNoOutputYesN/APhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4This can be calculated through a coverage survey or using a proxy indicator from the reporting systemSAM and MAM management reports at district or higher levelH2 Child health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, W1 Hygiene Promotion, W7 Aggravating Factors
NutritionN-066N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesIron-folic acid supplementation coverage in adolescent girlsProportion of adolescent girls receiving micronutrient supplements that contain adequate iron Individual or facilityPercentageEstimated total number of adolescent girls who meet target criteria for iron-folic acid supplementationNumber of adolescent girls who received micronutrient supplements with adequate iron-folic acid in/with one of their meals the previous dayGeographical areaNoOutputYespreparatory; Phase III and IVPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 3, Phase 4Where a survey has been done, these data should be utilized, otherwise administrative or facility level data can be utilized, however a caution should be paid that denominator of this coverage utilizes estimated number of people that meets criteria for supplementation. Population survey with representative sampling methods (eg, MICS, DHA, SMART)H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health
NutritionN-067N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesWomen iodine supplementation coverageProportion of women of child-bearing age who received iodine supplements Individual or facilityPercentageEstimated total number of women of child-bearing ageNumber of women of child-bearing age who received iodine supplementsGeographical area, age groupNoOutputYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Where a survey has been done, these data should be utilized, otherwise administrative or facility level data can be utilized, however a caution should be paid that denominator of this coverage utilizes estimated number of people that meets criteria for supplementation. Iodine supplements for women and/or children according to guideline (http://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/micronutrients/WHOStatement__IDD_pregnancy.pdf). H2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health
NutritionN-068N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesDeworming coverage in childrenProportion of children 12-59 months who received deworming medication in the previous 6 months Individual or facilityPercentageEstimated total number of children 12-59 monthsNumber of children 12-59 months who received deworming medication in the previous 6 monthsGeographical area, sexNoOutputYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Where a survey has been done, these data should be utilized, otherwise administrative or facility level data can be utilized, however a caution should be paid that denominator of this coverage utilizes estimated number of people that meets criteria for supplementation. H2 Child health
NutritionN-069N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesDeworming coverage in adolescentsProportion of adolescent girls who received deworming medication in the previous 6 months Individual or facilityPercentageEstimated total number of adolescent girlsNumber of adolescent girls who received deworming medication in the previous 6 monthsGeographical areaNoOutputYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Where a survey has been done, these data should be utilized, otherwise administrative or facility level data can be utilized, however a caution should be paid that denominator of this coverage utilizes estimated number of people that meets criteria for supplementation. H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-070N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesDeworming coverage in pregnant womenProportion of mothers of children 0-59 months of age who took deworming medication during the last pregnancy. Individual or facilityPercentageEstimated total number of mothers of children 0-59 months of ageNumber of mothers of children 0-59 months of age who took deworming medication during the last pregnancyGeographical areaNoOutputYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Where a survey has been done, these data should be utilized, otherwise administrative or facility level data can be utilised, however a caution should be paid that denominator of this coverage utilizes estimated number of people that meets criteria for supplementation. H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-071N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesMultiple micronutrients coverageProportion of target population that received multiple micronutrient powder/capsules Individual or facilityPercentageEstimated total number of target population that meets selection criteriaNumber of target population that received multiple micronutrient powder/capsulesGeographical area, sex, age groupYesOutputYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Countries or affected areas may choose to modify the age group to 6-23 months or 6-36 months depending on needs. Where a survey has been done, these data should be utilized, otherwise administrative or facility level data can be utilised, however a caution should be paid that denominator of this coverage utilizes estimated number of people that meets criteria for supplementation. Capsules are used for PLW supplementation and powders are used for childrenH2 Child health
NutritionN-072N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesMicronutrient knowledge (in-depth)Proportion of target population who knows key elements of the nutrition messages provided on availability, use and benefits of micronutrient supplements or micronutrient rich or fortified foods/ food supplements IndividualPercentageEstimated total number of target population that meets selection criteriaNumber of target population that meets selection criteria who know key elements of the nutrition messages provided on availability, use and benefits of micronutrient supplements or micronutrient rich or fortified foods/ food supplementsGeographical area, sex, age groupNoOutputYestarget - 85%Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Attention should be paid on how mothers/fathers, women/men are equally knowledgeable about micronutrients. It is important to ensure that target group consists of both males and females.SurveyH2 Child health, H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-073N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesZinc utilization for diarrhoea treatmentProportion of non-SAM children with diarrhoea treated with ORS supplemented with zinc Individual or facilityPercentageTotal number of non-SAM children with diarrhoea treatedNumber of non-SAM children with diarrhoea treated with ORS supplemented with zincGeographical areaNoOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 3.3Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4H2 Child health
NutritionN-074N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesProphylactic zinc supplementation in children coverageProportion of children received prophylactic zinc supplements according to national protocols IndividualPercentageTotal number of children eligible to receive prophylactic zinc supplements according to national protocolsNumber of children received prophylactic zinc supplements according to national protocolsGeographical area, sex, age groupNoOutputYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Only applicable for countries where zinc supplementation for prophylaxis is a policyH2 Child health
NutritionN-075N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesCalcium supplementation in pregnant womenProportion of pregnant women who received calcium supplements during their last pregnancy IndividualPercentageTotal number of pregnant women eligible to receive calcium supplements during their last pregnancyNumber of pregnant women who received calcium supplements during their last pregnancyGeographical area, age group, pregnancy statusNoOutputYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Where a survey has been done, these data should be utilized, otherwise administrative or facility level data can be utilized, however a caution should be paid that denominator of this coverage utilizes estimated number of people that meets criteria for supplementation. In populations where calcium intake is low, calcium supplementation is recommended for the prevention of pre-eclampsia among pregnant women, particularly those at higher risk of hypertension. Calcium for pregnant women http://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/micronutrients/guidelines/calcium_supplementation/en/index.html)H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-076N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingAccess to breastfeeding corners Proportion of breastfeeding mothers of children 0-2 years with access to breastfeeding corners IndividualPercentageNumber of breastfeeding mothers of children 0-2 years of ageNumber of breastfeeding mothers of children 0-2 years of age with access to breastfeeding cornersGeographical areaYesOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 2.2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4H4.2 Maternal and newborn care, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P5 Vulnerability, S1.2 Assistance
NutritionN-077N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingBreastfeeding support inclusionProportion of programmes that includes support of breastfeeding mothers as a specific programme component FacilityPercentageNumber of programmesNumber of programmes where breastfeeding mothers receive support as a specific componentGeographical areaYesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4H4.2 Maternal and newborn care
NutritionN-078N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingProportion of mothers relactatedProportion of mothers who successfully relactated FacilityNumberTotal number of mothers who received relactation supportNumber of mothers who successfully relactatedGeographical areaYesOutcomeYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Need to define criteria for "successful" relactation
NutritionN-079N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingConsumption of iron-rich or iron-fortified foodsProportion of children 6-23 months of age who receive an iron-rich food or iron-fortified food that is specially designed for infants and young children, or that is fortified in the home. IndividualPercentageTotal number of children 6-23 monthsNumber of children 6-23 months who receive an iron-rich food or iron fortified foodGeographical areaYesOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 2.2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4F1 Food Assistance, H2 Child health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health
NutritionN-080N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingProportion of FBFProportion of children 6-23 months received fortified blended foods IndividualPercentageTotal number of children 6-23 monthsNumber of children 6-23 months received fortified blended foodsGeographical areaNoOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 2.2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4F1 Food Assistance
NutritionN-081N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingInfants who have access to BMS supplies and supportProportion of non-breastfed infants under 6 months of age who have access to BMS supplies and support IndividualPercentageTotal number of non-breastfed infants under 6 months of age in surveyed areaTotal number of non-breastfed infants under 6 months of age who have access to BMS supplies and supportGeographical areaNoProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-082N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingBMS targetingProportion of programmes where BMS are appropriately targeted, based on qualified assessment and governed by accepted criteria FacilityPercentageTotal number of programmes where BMS are providedNumber of programmes where BMS are appropriately targetedGeographical areaYesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-083N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingPreparation BMS educationProportion of programmes where education and practical training on safe preparation of BMS for caregivers is included FacilityPercentageTotal number of programmes where BMS are distributedNumber of programmes where education and practical training for caregivers on safe preparation od BMS is includedGeographical areaNoProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4Should be targeted to caregivers or children that will receive BMS (avoid spill over effect)(R) Early Recovery, W1 Hygiene Promotion
NutritionN-084N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingBMS follow upProportion of programmes where there is follow-up of BMS recipients, both at distribution point and at household level FacilityPercentageTotal number of programmes with BMS distributionNumber of programmes where there is follow-up of BMS recipients at distribution point and at household levelGeographical areaNoProcessNoPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-085N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingBMS labelling languageProportion of programmes where BMS used labelled in an appropriate language FacilityPercentageTotal number of programmes where BMS are usedNumber of programmes where BMS used are labelled in an appropriate languageGeographical areaNoProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-086N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingBMS shelf lifeProportion of programmes where distributed BMS DOES NOT have a shelf-life of at least six months FacilityPercentageNumber of programs where BMS are providedNumber of programs where BMS does not have a shelf life of at least six monthsGeographical areaNoProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.1Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-087N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingNo secure supply of BMSProportion of programmes where a secure supply of BMS been HAS NOT been established FacilityPercentageNumber of programmes where BMS are distributedNumber of programmes where a secure supply of BMS have not been establishedGeographical areaNoProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-088N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingAdmissions with BMSProportion of children who were already on BMS when admitted to the programme IndividualNumberTotal number of children admitted to programmeNumber of children admitted to programme who were already BMSGeographical areaNoProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.2target: 100%Phases I, II, III, IVPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-089N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingInfants in need of BMSProportion of children admitted to programme who are in need of BMS IndividualNumberTotal number of children admitted to programmeNumber of children admitted to programme who are in need of BMSGeographical areaNoProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.2Phases I, II, III, IVPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-090N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingBaby bottles or teats distributionProportion of programmes where baby bottles or teats are being used and/or distributed as feeding utensils? FacilityPercentageNumber of programmes where BMS are distributedNumber of programmes where baby bottles or teats are being used or distributedGeographical areaYesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.1Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-091N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingBMS distributionProportion of programmes where BMS are distributed as part of the food aid distribution FacilityPercentageNumber of programmes where BMS are distributedNumber of programmes where BMS are distributed as part of food aidGeographical areaYesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.1Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4F1 Food Assistance
NutritionN-092N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingCode violationsNumber of recorded Code violations CommunityNumberN/ANumber of recorded Code violationsGeographical areaNoProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.1Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4F1 Food Assistance
NutritionN-093N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingDonations interceptedNumber of donations of BMS, complementary foods, bottles or teats successfully intercepted Facility or communityNumberN/ANumber of donations of BMS, complementary foods, bottles or teats successfully interceptedGeographical areaYesOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 2.1Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4F1 Food Assistance
NutritionN-094N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingDonations not intercepted Number of donations of BMS, complementary foods, bottles or teats not successfully intercepted Facility or communityNumberN/ANumber of donations of BMS, complementary foods, bottles or teats not successfully interceptedGeographical areaNoOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 2.1Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4F1 Food Assistance
NutritionN-095N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingThe code labelling of BMSProportion of programmes where the labels of BMS DO NOT comply with the labelling requirements of the Code FacilityPercentageNumber of programs where BMS are providedNumber of programs where labels do not comply with the CODEGeographical areaNoProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.1Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-096N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingIYCF in HIV contextProportion of programmes that follows national policy on HIV FacilityPercentageTotal number of programmesNumber of programmes where individual risk assessment (applying AFASS criteria) is carried out on an ongoing basis for artificially fed infantsGeographical areaNoProcessNoPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-097N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding IYCF supportProportion of caregivers received skilled IYCF support IndividualPercentageTotal number of caregivers eligible to receive skilled IYCF support according to national protocols surveyedNumber of caregivers received skilled IYCF supportGeographical area, sexNoOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 2.2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4"skilled "should be defined
NutritionN-098N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingIYCF-E orphans and unaccompanied children receiving servicesNumber of orphans and unaccompanied infants and children 0-23 months who receive nutritional and care support IndividualNumberTotal number of orphans, unaccompanied infants and young children in need of nutritional care and supportNumber of orphans, unaccompanied young children and young children who receive nutritional care and supportGeographical areaNoOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 2.2Phase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-099N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingVoucher/cash IYCFNumber of voucher/cash programmes targeting families with children U2 with an IYCF objective FacilityNumberN/ANumber of voucher/cash programmes targeting families with children U2 with an IYCF objectiveGeographical areaNoOutputYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-100N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingVoucher/cash infantsNumber of voucher/cash programmes targeting families with infants under 6 months with a breastfeeding objective FacilityNumberN/ANumber of voucher/cash programmes targeting families with infants under 6 months with a breastfeeding objectiveGeographical areaNoOutputYesPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-101N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingCode violations followed upProportion of reported code violations which were followed up FacilityPercentageNumber of reported code violationsNumber of reported code violations which were followed upGeographical areaYesOutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 2.1, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 1: Policy guidance and coordination (Key indicator 4)Target - 100%All phasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-102N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesFocus group discussionsProportion of nutrition programmes that had separate focus group discussions with affected girls, women, boys and men during assessment, planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation FacilityPercentageTotal number of nutrition programmesNumber of nutrition programmes that had separate focus group discussions with affected girls, women, boys and men during assessment, planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluationGeographical area, sex, age, phase of project (assessment, planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation), response domainNoProcessNoSphere: Core Standard 1: People-cantered humanitarian responseTarget - 100%All phasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4(R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-103N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesSingle sex consultations on effective responseProportion of partners routinely conducting single sex consultations to discuss about how effectively they respond to distinct nutritional needs of the affected population and to address any challenges in accessing assistance FacilityPercentageTotal number of partners responding to the emergencyNumber of partners routinely conducting single sex consultations to discuss about how effectively they respond to distinct nutritional needs of the affected population and to address any challenges in accessing assistanceResponse domainNoProcessNoSphere: Core Standard 1: People-cantered humanitarian responseTarget - 100%Phases III, IVPhase 3, Phase 4(R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-104N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesSatisfaction with access to servicesProportion of target population disaggregated by sex satisfied with their access to services at the end of the project IndividualPercentageTotal number of men/women benefited from the projectNumber of men/women satisfied with their access to services at the end of the projectGeographical area, sex, response domainNoOutputYesTarget - 100%Phases III, IVPhase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-105N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesKnowledge of good nutrition/IYCF practicesProportion of target population disaggregated by sex who have increased knowledge of good nutrition/IYCF practices at the end of the project IndividualPercentageTotal number of men and total number of women participated in the projectNumber of men/women who have increased knowledge of good nutrition practices at the end of the projectGeographical area, response domainNoOutputYesTarget - 100%Phases III, IVPhase 3, Phase 4(R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-106N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients DeficienciesMen participation in nutrition programmesProportion of men participated in nutritional education programmes IndividualPercentageTotal number of people participated in nutritional education programmesNumber of men participated in nutritional education programmesGeographical area, response domainNoOutputYesPhases II, III, IV Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4(R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-107N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingIYCF policyA national and/or agency policy is in place that addresses IYCF and reflects the Operational Guidance on IFE CommunityYes/NoN/AN/AN/AYesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.1, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 1: Policy guidance and coordination (Key indicator 1)YesAll phasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4(R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-108N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingIYCF coordinating bodyA lead coordinating body on IYCF is designated CommunityYes/NoN/AN/AN/AYesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.1, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 1: Policy guidance and coordination (Key indicator 2)YesAll phasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4(R) Early Recovery
NutritionN-109N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingBody to deal with donationsA body to deal with any donations of BMS, milk products, bottles and teats is designated CommunityYes/NoN/AN/AN/AYesProcessNoFood Security and Nutrition 2.1, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 1: Policy guidance and coordination (Key indicator 3)YesAll phasesPre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4
NutritionN-110N2 Infant and Young Child FeedingIYCF-E CapacityProportion of emergency-affected areas that have an adequate number of skilled IYCF counsellors and/or functioning support groups CommunityPercentageTotal number of emergency-affected areasNumber of emergency-affected areas that have an adequate number of skilled IYCF counsellors and/or functioning support groupsGeographical areaYesBaseline, OutputYesFood Security and Nutrition 2.2, Sphere: Infant and young child feeding standard 2: Basic and skilled supportPhase III and IVPhase 3, Phase 4H2 Child health
ProtectionP-1(P) ProtectionNumber of civilians reported killed by violenceHouseholdAge, sex, geographic unit, YesBaseline, OutputC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PM4 Victim Assistance, P5 Vulnerability
ProtectionP-10(P) ProtectionPercentage of communities to which international and/or national humanitarian organizations' access to populations has been limited by duty bearers or armed actors Communitygeographic unit/perpetrator/type of settlement/cause YesBaseline, OutputC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.8 Access and Movement, E1 Access and Learning Environment, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return
ProtectionP-11(P) ProtectionPercentage of persons in need of legal assistance receiving legal assistance/adviceIndividualage/sex/geographic unit, title/function YesOutputC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP-12(P) ProtectionEstimated percentage of affected population in need of mental health and/or psychosocial supportInstitutionage/sex YesBaseline, OutputIASC guidelines: "The composite term Mental Health and Psychosocial Support is used to describe any type of local or outside support that aims to protect or promote psychosocial well-being and/or prevent or treat mental disorders."C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H4.3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP-13(P) ProtectionPercentage of communities reporting living in hazardous areas Hazardous areas are those which are prone to flooding, earthquake, fires etc Communitygeographic unit YesBaseline, OutputC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, P6 Displacement and Return, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, S1 Shelter, W7 Aggravating Factors
ProtectionP-14(P) ProtectionPercentage of communities reporting hazardous items in their area that can result in death or injury Hazardous items are debris/rubbel; for more specific indicators on mines/landmines/UxOs see the Mine action indicators Community# of surveyed communities# of communities who have reported existence of dangerous/hazardeous areas/items in their area that can result in death or injury GeographyYesBaseline, OutputC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, P6 Displacement and Return, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, S1 Shelter
ProtectionP-15(P) ProtectionPercentage of communities that indicate deliberate exclusion from services for a specific group (i.e. children, disabled, minority groups) Communitygeographic unit YesBaseline, OutputC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, F3 Food Access, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery, S1.1 Access, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation
ProtectionP-2(P) ProtectionPercentage [or number of] community assets (bridge, school, hospital, place of worship etc.) being attackedThis can be an absolute figure instead of a percentage if the total number of assets is not available CommunityType of assetYesBaseline, OutputThe COD/FODs should provide the basis on how to establish this indicator as community assets are being mapped before the crisis C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PM4 Victim Assistance, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP-3(P) ProtectionNumber of persons reported disappeared/abducted / missing [broken down by geographical area]Individualage/sex/diversity group/geographic unit/perpetratorYesBaseline, OutputC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP-4(P) ProtectionPercentage of communities reporting persons being arbitrarily detainedCommunityage/sex/geographic unit/perpetrator YesBaseline, OutputDetention must be based on grounds and procedures established by law; information of the reasons must be given and court control of the detention must be available as well compensation in case of breach; detention that does not meet these criteria is arbitrary . If protection monitoring is able to be done at the individual level and not just at the community level, this indicator should be adjusted to measure the number of individuals.C1.2 CCCM Mechanisms, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P5 Vulnerability
ProtectionP-5(P) ProtectionPercentage of persons being arbitrarily detained who are receiving legal assistance/advice Individual or facilityage/sex YesOutputC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, PC8 Justice for Children, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP-6(P) ProtectionPercentage of communities reporting persons being forcibly recruited into armed group/forces Communityage/sex/geographic unit/perpetrator YesBaseline, OutputAny recruitment of children is to be considered forced recruitment If protection monitoring is able to be done at the individual level and not just at the community level, this indicator should be adjusted to measure the number of individuals. C1.2 CCCM Mechanisms, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groups, P5 Vulnerability, R4 Governance
ProtectionP-7(P) ProtectionPercentage of communities reporting cases of organized violence, torture, or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishmentIt should be discussed at the coutry level whether and how appropriate it is to report on torture etc. Communityage/sex/diversity group/geographic unit/perpetratorYesBaseline, OutputIf protection monitoring is able to be done at the individual level and not just at the community level, this indicator should be adjusted to measure the number of individuals.C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP-8(P) ProtectionPercentage of communities reporting cases of survivors of organized violence, torture, inhuman and/or degrading treatment receiving assistance Assistance could be psychosocial support, legal assistance, material assistance Communityage/sex/ type of support activityYesOutputIf protection monitoring is able to be done at the individual level and not just at the community level, this indicator should be adjusted to measure the number of individuals.C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP-9(P) ProtectionPercentage of communities reporting survivors of trafficking for exploitation (labour or sex) receiving assistance Communityage/sex/support activityYesOutputIf protection monitoring is able to be done at the individual level and not just at the community level, this indicator should be adjusted to measure the number of individuals.C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, P5 Vulnerability, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods
ProtectionP1-PC1-1PC11 Case ManagementPercentage of care plans for individual children developed within two weeks of the opening of the child's care planThis includes case management for cases of physical violence and other harmful practices(MS 8), psychosocial distress and mental disorders (MS 10), sexual violence (MS 9), children formerly associated with armed forces or armed groups (MS 11), worst forms of child labour (MS 12), separation and unaccompaniment (MS 13), justice for children (MS 14) IndividualPercentage# of care plans for individual children developed# of care plans developed within two weeks of the assessment of the assessment of the child's situationSex, age and type of case NoOutputYes0.9Note that this relates to CP minimum Standard 15: "Case management" 'Strategies' will need to be defined in each context, the IACPIMS is recommended Interagency Child Protection Information Management System (CPIMS)P5 Vulnerability
ProtectionP1-PC1-2PC11 Case ManagementPercentage of targeted communities with a functioning referral system for children at the community levelCommunityPercentage# of targeted communities# of targeted communities with a functioning referral systemGeographyNoOutputYesTo be determined in the countryFunctioning should be defined in the context; referral system for children includes at least the following services:When responding to this need, consider including indicators from Mimimum Standards 7 to 14Systematic ReviewC2 Population information management, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP1-PC2-1PC10 Excluded ChildrenPercentage of identified excluded children who are accessing protection services IndividualPercentage# of excluded children identified # of excluded children identified who have access to protection serviceGeography, age, sexNoOutputYes0.8"Excluded child" needs to be defined in the context; "Protection services" needs to be defined in the context.When responding to this need, consider including indicators from Mimimum Standards 7 to 14Case Management System CPIMS/Systematic ReviewC2 Population information management, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP1-PC2-3PC2 Physical violence and other harmful practicesPercentage of surveyed community members who are able to articulate strategies to prevent physical violence and other harmful practices Individual# community members surveyed# community members surveyed who can articulate knowledge of ways to prevent physical violence and other harmful practices Sex of respondents, type of strategies articulated, type of intervention implemented during 'x'(tdb) months prior to the surveyNoOutcomeYesNote that this relates to CP Minimum Standard 15: "Case management"; the minimum requirements for a strategy need to be defined in the country context, e.g. Child Protection Strategy, Protection Cluster Strategy, etc. SurveyC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, E2 Teaching and Learning, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, E4 Educational Policy, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP1-PC3-1PC3 Sexual violencePercentage of surveyed communities that indicate a change in the incidence of sexual violence against children since [DATE-EMERGENCY-ETC]The date to be used for this baseline indicator needs to be determined in country - it could be the start of the emergency or an interagency agreed date in a protratcted crisis, eg the previous three months CommunityPercentage# of surveyed communities# of surveyed communities that indicate a change in the incidence of sexual violence against children Geography and where appropriate, other distinguishing characteristics of the communities YesBaseline, OutcomeYesA CPRA is recommended for collecting this indicator before and after the response, during which the start of the emergency will be definedChild Protection Rapid Assessment (CPRA)E1 Access and Learning Environment, H2 Child health, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP1-PC3-2PC3 Sexual violenceChild Protection actors have done an analysis of how sexual violence towards boys and girls is viewed and responded to yes/no indicator; need to include both elements of the context analysis (viewed and responded to) to be counted as "yes" Communityn/a# of child protection actors # of child protection actors who have an understanding of how sexual violence (towards boys and girls) is viewed by families and communities before programming (Y/N)GeographyNoOutputYesYesThis indicator is measured based on whether or not proper contextual analysis has been conducted by child protection actors in country and inter-agency strategies programming reflects thisSystematic ReviewE1 Access and Learning Environment, H2 Child health, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP1-PC4-1PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disordersPercentage of communities [or camps] that have functioning safe spaces for children [and/or youth] Community# of communities or camps that were identified as in need of safe spaces for children and/or youth# of communities or camps that have safe spaces for children and/or youthGeographyNoOutputYes1Note that this relates to CP Minimum Standard 17: "Child friendly spaces"; "Functioning" should be defined as per the context.When responding to this need, consider including indicators from CP Minimum Standards 16 and 18CP monitoringC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, E1 Access and Learning Environment, H2 Child health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, R4 Governance
ProtectionP1-PC4-2PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disordersPercentage of surveyed communities who indicate children exhibit behavioural changes that relate to symptoms of distress since [DATE-EMERGENCY-ETC]The date to be used for this baseline indicator needs to be determined in country - it could be the start of the emergency or an interagency agreed date in a protratcted crisis, eg the previous three months CommunityPercentage# of surveyed communities# of surveyed communities who indicate that children exhibit behavioural changes that relate to signs and symptoms of distress Geography and, where appropriate, other distinguishing characteristics of communitiesYesBaseline, OutcomeNoA CPRA is recommended for collecting this indicator before and after the response, during which the start of the emergency will be defined Child Protection Rapid Assessment (CPRA)C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E2 Teaching and Learning, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, H2 Child health, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP1-PC4-3PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disordersPercentage of community members surveyed who know how to support children with psychosocial distressknow means that they can name at least one response activity appropriate for children; the indicator needs to make use of the MHPSS intervention pyramid and will be assessed through a Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices Survey CommunityPercentage# of surveyed communities# of community members surveyed who can demonstrate knowledge of how to support children with psychosocial distressgeographyNoOutputYes0.8SurveyC2 Population information management, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E2 Teaching and Learning, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration
ProtectionP1-PC4-4PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disordersPercentage of Child Friendly Spaces where structured age appropriate CFS activities are implemented based on needs identified by girls, boys and familiesFacilityPercentageEstimated # of affected children Estimated # of children with safe access to child friendly spaces for socialising, play, learning , etc Geography; sexNoOutcome, OutputYesNote that this relates to CP minimum standard 17: "Child friendly spaces"When responding to this need, consider including indicators from Mimimum Standards 16 and 18MonitoringC2 Population information management, C2.3 Service Provision, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, H2 Child health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, R4 Governance
ProtectionP1-PC4-5PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disordersPercentage of cases identified in need of psychosocial/mental health services who are referred to specialist services IndividualPercentage# of children identified as in need of specific psychosocial and mental health services# of children identified as in need of specific psychosocial and mental health services who are referred to focsed specialised servicesage, sex, geographyYesOutputWhen responding to this need, consider including indicators from Mimimum Standards 16 and 18Case Management System CPIMSP1 (PC) Child Protection, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP1-PC5-1PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groupsPercentage of surveyed communities who note the recruitment of children into armed forces and/or groupsCommunityPercentage# of surveyed sites indicating the recruitment of children# of surveyed communities who reported recruitment of children in their community % of reporting surveyed sites indicating recruitment of childrenYesBaseline, OutcomeYesA CPRA is recommended for collecting this indicator before and after the responseChild Protection Rapid Assessment (CPRA)C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C1.2 CCCM Mechanisms, C2 Population information management, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F4 Income Access, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods
ProtectionP1-PC5-2PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groupsPercentage of registered children separated from armed forces or groups, who are effectively reintegrated in their families or alternatively integratedIndividualPercentage# of registered girls and boys separated from armed forces or groups # of registered girls and boys separated from armed forces or groups who are effectively reintegrated in their families and the community or alternatively integratedGeography, sex, ageYesOutcomeYes1Note that this relates to CP Minimum Standard 15: "Case management". 'Effective Reintegration' needs to be defined in the country. 'Registered' refers to children registered in a case management system.When responding to this need, consider including indicators from Mimimum Standards 16 and 18Case Management System CPIMSC2 Population information management, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F4 Income Access, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods
ProtectionP1-PC5-3PC5 Children associated with armed forces and armed groupsPercentage of community members surveyed who can describe at least one action to prevent child recruitment and one action to report on child recruitmentBoth elements, i.e. reporting and prevention need to be assessed to have an idea of the communities capacity IndividualPercentage# of community members surveyed # of communities members surveyed who can describe commonly agreed strategies to prevent and report child recruitmentGeographyNoOutputYesTo be determined in country and contextWhen responding to this need, consider including indicators from Mimimum Standards 16 and 18SurveyC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F4 Income Access, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods
ProtectionP1-PC6-1PC6 Child LabourPercentage of surveyed communities who indictate the involvement of children in worst forms of child labourWorst form of child labour is a term defined in the ILO convention no. 182. It must be prohibited for all people under the age of 18 yrs and includes the following: (i) all forms of slavery and practices similar to slavery; (ii) using, offering, procuring a child for prostitution, production of pornographie or for pornographic performance; (iii) using, procuring, offering a child for illicit activities; (iv) hazardous work CommunityPercentage# of surveyed communities# of surveyed communities who have reported involvement of children in worst forms of child labourAge / Sex; In phase 4 disaggregate by type of labourYesBaseline, OutcomeNoA CPRA is recommended for collecting this indicator before and after the responseChild Protection Rapid Assessment (CPRA)C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, H6 Environmental Health, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
ProtectionP1-PC6-2PC6 Child LabourPercentage of surveyed community members are aware of the danger and consequences of the Worst Forms of Child LabourWorst form of child labour is a term defined in the ILO convention no. 182. It must be prohibited for all people under the age of 18 yrs and includes the following: (i) all forms of slavery and practices similar to slavery; (ii) using, offering, procuring a child for prostitution, production of pornographie or for pornographic performance; (iii) using, procuring, offering a child for illicit activities; (iv) hazardous work; Depending on the country context this indicator should specify which forms of child labour are meant to be assessed and the knowledge thereof by the community CommunityPercentage# of surveyed communities# of communities that are aware of the danger and consequences of the Worst Forms of Child LabourGeography, role of community member interviewedNoOutputYes0.8This indicator is linked to information campaigns and awareness raising efforts.SurveyC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E2 Teaching and Learning, F1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, H6 Environmental Health, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
ProtectionP1-PC7-1PC7 Unaccompanied and separated childrenPercentage of children separated from their caregiversIndividualn/a# of surveyed communities # of surveyed communities that indicate incidence of children separated from their caregiversDisaggregate SC, UAC, and orphans by sex in Phase 4YesBaseline, OutcomeYesCPRA (Question 1)A CPRA is recommended for collecting this indicator before and after the responseChild Protection Rapid Assessment (CPRA)C2 Population information management, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E2 Teaching and Learning, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, F1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, S1.1 Access
ProtectionP1-PC7-2PC7 Unaccompanied and separated childrenPercentage of registered unaccompanied and/or separated children who are reunited with their caregivers OR in appropriate long term alternative careBoth options need to be assessed, i.e. long term care or caregivers; both options are sufficient IndividualPercentage# of registered UASC # of registered Unaccompanied and Separated Children (UASC) who are reunited with their caregivers OR in appropriate long term alternativeGeography, sex, ageYesOutputYes0.9Note that this relates to CP minimum Standard 15: "Case management"When responding to this need, consider including indicators from Mimimum Standards 16 and 18Case Management SystemC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, S1.1 Access
ProtectionP1-PC7-3PC7 Unaccompanied and separated childrenPercentage of children registered for tracing that have been reunified and stayed with their family for more than six monthsThis indicator captures the monitoring of cases which has to be done every three months as follow up action; see Minimum CP standards IndividualPercentage# of children registered for family tracing# of children registered for tracing that has been reunified and stayed with their family for more than six monthsGeography, sex, ageYesOutcomeYes0.9Note that this relates to CP minimum Standard 15: "Case management"When responding to this need, consider including indicators from Mimimum Standards 16 and 18Case Management System CPIMSC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, H2 Child health, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, S1 Shelter
ProtectionP1-PC7-4PC7 Unaccompanied and separated childrenPercentage of registered unaccompanied/separated children in appropriate interim careIndividualPercentage# of registered unaccompanied and separated children# of registered unaccompanied and separated children in appropriate interim careGeography, age, sexYesOutput0.9The appropriate care should be defined in the country context, but need to be related to the CP minimum Standard 15: "Case management"When responding to this need, consider including indicators from Mimimum Standards 16 and 18Case Management System CPIMSC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, H2 Child health, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, S1 Shelter
ProtectionP1-PC7-5PC7 Unaccompanied and separated children SoPs for family reunification established or reflected in generic SoPsFacilityn/a# of child protection actors # of child protection actors who have an understanding of SoPs for family reunification (Y/N)NoOutputYesYes/no indicator Systematic ReviewC2 Population information management, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation
ProtectionP1-PC8-1PC8 Justice for ChildrenPercentage of facilities surveyed who indicate increased numbers of children detained since [DATE-EMERGENCY-ETC]This indicator needs to be collected at the facility level (i.e. detention centres etc.); The date to be used for this baseline indicator needs to be determined in country - it could be the start of the emergency or an interagency agreed date in a protratcted crisis, eg the previous three months FacilityPercentage# of surveyed communities # of surveyed communities who indicate increased numbers of children detained Geography, sex, ageYesBaseline, OutcomeYesTo be determined in the countryA CPRA is recommended for collecting this indicator before and after the response which will define the start of the emergency Child Protection Rapid Assessment (CPRA)C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, R4 Governance
ProtectionP1-PC9-1PC9 Community-based child protection mechanisms (CBCPM)Percentage of communities surveyed who confirm that Community based Child Protection Mechanisms (CBCPMs) exist in their community CommunityPercentage# of community members surveyed # of communities members surveyed who confirm that CBCPMs exist in their communityGeographyYesBaseline, OutcomeYes0.8The data for this indicator should be extracted from a monitoring systemWhen responding to this need, consider including indicators from Mimimum Standards 7-14SurveyC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F1 Food Assistance, H2 Child health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, S1 Shelter
ProtectionP2-PG1-1PG1 Developing Referral Pathway for SurvivorsFunctional referral system in place that includes multi-sectoral services (health, psychosocial, legal and security) for GBV survivorsyes/no indicator CommunityYes/No indicatorN/AN/AGeography, Types of servicesYesBaseline, OutcomeYesC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H4.3 Sexual violence, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, R4 Governance
ProtectionP2-PG2-1PG2 Develop/apply SOPs context specificWritten Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for GBV prevention and response developed and agreed upon by all relevant humanitarian actors CommunityYes/No indicatorN/AN/AGeographyYesBaseline, OutcomeYesC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP2-PG3-1PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial)Proportion of community-based workers trained in psychosocial support for GBV survivorsCommunityPercentagetotal # community workers# community- based workers trained in GBV psychosocial supportGeography; SexYesOutputYesSPHERESurvivors of sexual violence should be supported to seek and be referred for clinical care and have access to mental health and psychosocial support" (Guidance Note 3: sexual violence)[REMOVED COMMENTS HERE]C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, R4 Governance
ProtectionP2-PG3-10PG6 Prevention Programming% of health workers trained on Clinical Management of RapeClinical Management of Rape (CMR) is an internationally recognized standard of care for survivors of sexual violence. CommunityPercentagetotal # of health workers (in the categories selected at the national level, e.g. medical officers, nurses, etc.)# health staff trained on Clinical Management of RapeHealth Administrative Area; Sex: Level of health workers (medical doctor, nurse, midwife)YesOutputYesSPHEREMeasures for assisting survivors must be in place for all primary-level health facilities and include skilled staff to provide clinical management that encompasses emergency contraception, post-exposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV, presumptive treatment of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), wound care, tetanus prevention and hepatitis B prevention..." (Guidance Note 3: sexual violence)To be used in conjunction with the Health Cluster's H-A.6 indicator: "Percentage of functional health facilities with Clinical Management of Rape survivor services". In order for survivors to receive the care they need, in addition to available CMR supplies, there must also be sufficient numbers of staff trained on CMR. Denominator should be limited to doctors, nurses, etc. (not medical admin staff).C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H4.3 Sexual violence, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP2-PG3-2PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial)Percentage of reported rape cases where survivor receives post-exposure prophylaxsis for HIV (PEP) within 72 hours of incidentPEP must be administered within 72 hours of exposure in order to effectively prevent HIV transmission. CommunityPercentageTotal # of reported incidents of rape# survivors of rape who receive PEP within 72 hours of incidentGeography; SADD; DisabilityNoBaseline, OutcomeYesTracking this indicator requires that the user also track Indicator P2-PG5-1 (reported incidents of sexual violence). However, it is important to note that rape -- defined as "non-consensual penetration (however slight) of the vagina, anus or mouth with a penis or other body part. Also includes penetration of the vagina or anus with an object." (GBVIMS definition) -- is a sub-set of the broader category "sexual violence". Care administered should be survivor-centred, respecting the principles of safety, confidentiality and informed consent. Data on GBV incidents/treatment should never be stored with any identifying information about the survivor. For more detailed analysis, the user can calculate this indicator with a slightly different denominator -- "Total # of rape incidents reported within 72 hours". These two options reflect that delays in administering life-saving services can occur before or after a survivor seeks care (for example, are delays occurring because the hospital is far away or because supplies are unavailable?)Two options for denominator in order to reflect that delays in administering life-saving services can occur before or after a survivor seeks care (i.e. is the delay because the hospital is far away or because supplies are unavailable?)C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H4.3 Sexual violence, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability
ProtectionP2-PG3-3PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial)Percentage of reported rape cases where survivor receives emergency contraceptive pills (ECP) within 120 hours of incidentEmergency contraception must be administered within 120 hours of the incident in order to be effective. CommunityPercentage of female rape survivorsTotal # of reported incidents of rape perpetrated against females # female survivors of rape who receive ECP within 120 hours of incidentGeography; SADD; DisabilityNoBaseline, OutcomeYesTracking this indicator requires that the user also track Indicator P2-PG5-1 (reported incidents of sexual violence). However, it is important to note that rape -- defined as "non-consensual penetration (however slight) of the vagina, anus or mouth with a penis or other body part. Also includes penetration of the vagina or anus with an object." (GBVIMS definition) -- is a sub-set of the broader category "sexual violence". Care administered should be survivor-centred, respecting the principles of safety, confidentiality and informed consent. Data on GBV incidents/treatment should never be stored with any identifying information about the survivor. For more detailed analysis, the user can calculate this indicator with a slightly different denominator -- "Total # of rape incidents reported within 120 hours". These two options reflect that delays in administering life-saving services can occur before or after a survivor seeks care (for example, are delays occurring because the hospital is far away or because supplies are unavailable?)Two options for denominator in order to reflect that delays in administering life-saving services can occur before or after a survivor seeks care (i.e. is the delay because the hospital is far away or because supplies are unavailable?)C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H4.3 Sexual violence, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability
ProtectionP2-PG3-4PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial)Percentage of health facilities where Clinical Management of Rape + Emergency Contraceptive Pills + Post-exposure prophylaxsis for HIV availableCommunityPercentagetotal # of health facilities# health facilities with CMR + ECP + PEP availableGeographyNoBaseline, OutcomeYesPeople have access to the priority reproductive health services of the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) at the onset of an emergency and comprehensive reproductive health as the situation stabilises (Need to fill in quantities of each drug per 10,000 populaiton)This indicator should be used in conjunction with the indicator about CMR training.C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H4.3 Sexual violence, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP2-PG3-5PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial)Number of community-based mechanisms/groups working on GBV prevention and response CommunityN/A# of community-based mechanisms working on GBV prevention and responseNoBaseline, OutcomeNoC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, R4 Governance
ProtectionP2-PG3-6PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial)Number of persons prosecuted for GBV related crimesCommunityN/A# of people prosecuted for GBV related crimesSADDNoOutcomeNoC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, R4 Governance
ProtectionP2-PG3-7PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial)Number of persons convicted for GBV related crimesCommunityN/ANumber of pepole convinceted for GBV related crimesSADDNoOutcomeNoC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, R4 Governance
ProtectionP2-PG3-8PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial)Number of service providers providing legal services to survivors of GBVCommunitygeographyNoOutcomeNoC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, R4 Governance
ProtectionP2-PG3-9PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial)Number of service providers providing psychosocial services to survivors of GBVCommunitygeographyNoOutputYesC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, R4 Governance
ProtectionP2-PG5-1PG5 Data collection, storage and sharingNumber of reported incidents of sexual violence per 10,000 population Data can be aggregated at different levels, country, regional, district etc. GBV specialistis in country to determine what is safe and appropriate, based on the context. Communityincidents per 10,000 populationtotal population / 10,000 in the area of analysis# of reported incidents of Sexual Violence in the area of analysisSADDNoBaseline, OutcomeYesIncidence of sexual violence should be monitoredGreat caution must be exercised when interpreting increases/decreases in reported incidents of GBV, as such fluctuations in reports do not necessarily reflect the same changes in overall incidence/prevalence. In general, this indicator is most useful when it serves as denominator for other indicators (i.e. P2-PG3-2 and P2-PG3-3), as opposed to tracking it in isoloation. C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, H4.3 Sexual violence, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, R4 Governance, W7 Aggravating Factors
ProtectionP2-PG5-2PG5 Data collection, storage and sharing% of surveyed communities indicating there is a risk of physical or sexual violenceCommunitytotal # of communities surveyed# of communities indicating there is a risk of physical or sexual violencen/a YesBaseline, OutcomeSPHEREHelp minimise other threats: provide assistance in ways that make people more secure, facilitating people's own efforts to stay safe or taking steps to reduce their exposure to risk (Sphere Guidance Note 10).This question should only be asked at a very general level about perceived risks, not about specific incidents or individual survivors. C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, R4 Governance, W7 Aggravating Factors
ProtectionP2-PG5-3PG5 Data collection, storage and sharingObserved or reported changes in women's and/or girls' mobility patternsQualitative information would be needed to further specify the causes of change; however, the yes/no indicator provides a first entry point for a more specific GBV assessment CommunityYes/ No indicatorN/AN/AGeographyYesBaseline, OutcomeYesSPHEREHelp minimise other threats: provide assistance in ways that make people more secure, facilitating people's own efforts to stay safe or taking steps to reduce their exposure to risk (Guidance Note 10).This is a qualitative indicator, and the changes may not be measurable. However, simply being attuned to such dynamics can lead to improved interventions across all humanitarian clusters/sectors.C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F3 Food Access, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, R4 Governance
ProtectionP2-PG6-1PG6 Prevention ProgrammingProtocols aligned with international standards have been established for the clinical management of rapeThis indicator examines the standards and procedures in place at medical facilities with regards to treating survivors of sexual violence. CommunityYes/ No indicatorn/an/an/aYesBaseline, OutcomeNoSPHEREShould be tracked in conjunction with the other indicators on CMR training and supplies.H4.3 Sexual violence, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP2-PG6-2PG6 Prevention ProgrammingPercentage of humanitarian organizations and service providers that have in place codes of conduct on prevention of sexual exploitation and abuse by own staffFacilityn/a YesBaseline, OutcomeNote: PSEA is not just a Protection or GBV issue. All actors in disaster relief must be aware of the risk of sexual violence including sexual exploitation and abuse by humanitarians, and must work to prevent and respond to it (Guidance Note 3: sexual violence)C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E4 Educational Policy, F1 Food Assistance, F7 Utilization, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H6 Environmental Health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P7 Documentation, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R4 Governance, S1 Shelter, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation
ProtectionP2-PG6-3PG6 Prevention ProgrammingPercentage of humanitarian organizations and service providers that have in place community-based feedback and complaint mechanismsFacilityn/a YesBaseline, OutcomeNote: PSEA is not just a Protection or GBV issue. All actors in disaster relief must be aware of the risk of sexual violence including sexual exploitation and abuse by humanitarians, and must work to prevent and respond to it (Guidance Note 3: sexual violence)C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E4 Educational Policy, F1 Food Assistance, F7 Utilization, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H6 Environmental Health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P7 Documentation, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R4 Governance, S1 Shelter, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy, W8 WASH Programme Design and Implementation
ProtectionP3-PL1-1PL1 HLP DocumentationNumber and Percentage of surveyed persons reporting personalHLP documentation issuesIndividualNumber and PercentageTotal # of persons / communities surveyed (for the percentage)# of persons reporting HLP documentation issuesGeographic; Administrative; Type of displacement site; Age; Sex; Specific groups / categories of persons (ethnicity, religion, disability; etc.); Individual status (i.e. refugee, IDP, host community); Type of documentYesBaselineYesAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Personal HLP documentation include legal and customary, invidual/collective records, and other informal types of evidence on land and property ownership. NB: Personal HLP documentation may have been lost or damaged during the emergency, or may have never been issued in the first place. C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, R4 Governance, S1.1 Access
ProtectionP3-PL1-2PL1 HLP DocumentationNumber of personal HLP documents protected, replaced or issued Numbern/a# of personal HLP documents protected, replaced, issuedGeographic; Administration; Type of displacement site; Age; Sex;Specific groups / categories of persons (ethnicity, religion, disability; etc.); Individual status (i.e. refugee, IDP, host community); Action conducted i.e. personal documents protected, replaced or issuedNoOutputYesAppropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, R4 Governance, S1.1 Access
ProtectionP3-PL1-3PL1 HLP DocumentationNumber of public HLP documents destroyed or damaged Individualn/an/a# public HLP documents destroyed or damaged Geographic; Administrative; Type of documentYesBaselineNoPublic HLP documents include all civil / state administration records, such as for example: land and housing registers; cadastral plans; etc. C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, R4 Governance, S1.1 Access
ProtectionP3-PL1-4PL1 HLP DocumentationNumber of public HLP records protected, replaced, improved, and/or createdIndividual or facilityNumber n/a# of public HLP records protected, replaced, inmproved, and/or createdGeographic; Administration; Action conducted i.e. public records protected, replaced, improved and / or createdNoOutputYesAppropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergency Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, R4 Governance, S1.1 Access
ProtectionP3-PL2-1PL2 Access to LandNumber and Percentage of surveyed persons/communities reporting a situation of forced evictionHouseholds or CommunitiesNumber and PercentageTotal # of persons / communities surveyed# of surveyed persons / communities reporting a situation of forced evictionGeographic; Administrative; Type of displacement site; Age; Sex; Specific groups / categories of persons (ethnicity, religion, disability; etc.); Individual status (i.e. refugee, IDP, host community); Type of situation reported (risk-incident of forced eviction)YesBaseline, OutcomeYesAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Situation of forced eviction can either refer to both the oral or written communication from local authorities, private owners etc.. of a threat/risk of being evicted as well as the incident itself of forced eviction. Forced eviction is defined as the permanent or temporary removal against their will of individuals, families and/or communities from the homes and/or lands which they occupy, without the provision of, and access to, appropriate forms of legal or other protection. Forced evictions can result from a broad range of situation such as for example: conflicts in which eviction, housing demolition and displacement are used as a weapon of war, for ethnic cleansing and population transfer; armed conflict characterized by targeting of civilians homes, including for collective punishment; lack of legal security of tenure, adequate protective legislation and/or their implementation; non-deliverance or non-recognition of titles over land and housing; changes related to housing and land in countries in transition. The scope of the issue of forced eviction is context-specific and should be defined at country level.C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, R4 Governance, S1 Shelter, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy
ProtectionP3-PL2-2PL2 Access to LandNumber and Percentage of surveyed persons / communities provided with support in situation of forced evictionHouseholds or CommunitiesNumber and PercentageTotal # of persons / communities surveyed# persons / communities provided with support in situation of forced evictionGeographic; Administrative; Type of displacement site; Age; Sex; Specific groups / categories of persons (ethnicity, religion, disability; etc.); Individual status (i.e. refugee, IDP, host community); Type of situation reported (risk-incident of forced eviction)NoOutputYesAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Support can be provided before, during and after a forced eviction. When a risk / threat of forced eviction has been communicated and before it occurs, a number of actions can be taken such as consultations with all parties involved to prevent the eviction or to identify appropriate alternatives. During an eviction, support aims at mitigating harm and suffering. After an eviction, continued support is provided to ensure access to remedies such as compensation of all material or non-material losses..C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, R4 Governance, S1 Shelter, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S3 Shelter-related Fuel/Energy
ProtectionP3-PL2-3PL2 Access to LandPercentage of the surveyed population settled on hazardous or inappropriate landCommunityPercentageTotal # of persons / communities surveyed # households / persons settled on hazardous and inappropriate landGeographic; Administrative; Household; Type of displacement site; Specific groups / categories of persons (ethnicity, religion, disability; etc.)YesBaselineYesAppropriate in phases 1-2 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2Refer to land which could be affected by different types of disasters associated with natural hazards (floods; earthquake; etc.) but also land areas affected by environmental degradation and vulnerabilites (include industrial pollution) and land situated in areas with high health risks (epidemics/seasonal outbreaks). This indicator covers both displaced and non-displaced emergency affected population. C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, R4 Governance, S1 Shelter, W7 Aggravating Factors
ProtectionP3-PL2-4PL2 Access to LandNumber and Percentage of surveyed persons / communities reporting lack or limited access to HLP rightsHouseholds or CommunitiesNumber and Percentage Total # persons / communities surveyed# of surveyed persons / communities indicating access to and enjoyment of HLP RightsGeographic; Administrative; Type of displacement site; Age; Sex; Specific groups / categories of persons (ethnicity, religion, disability; etc.); Individual status (i.e. refugee, IDP, host community)YesBaseline, OutcomeYesAppropriate in phases 3-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 3, Phase 4HLP right include a range of statutory and customary rights and entitlements relating to the right to use, control, transfer and enjoy properties. HLP rights may be acquired through a variety of means depending upon jurisdiction, including sale, inheritance, gift, grant from the State, adverse possession and customary-use right (such as land clearing). HLP rights include among others the right to adequate housing, the right to use land owned and exclude other people from using the land, property rights, etc.C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, R4 Governance, S1.1 Access
ProtectionP3-PL3-1PL3 HLP DisputesNumber and Percentage of surveyed persons / communities reporting HLP disputesHouseholds or CommunitiesNumber and Percentage Total # of persons / communities surveyed # of surveyed persons / communities reporting HLP disputesGeographic; Administrative; Type of displacement site; Age; Sex; Specific groups / categories of persons (ethnicity, religion, disability; etc.); Individual status (i.e. refugee, IDP, host community)YesBaseline, OutcomeYesAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4HLP disputes caused or exacerbated by the emergencies could comprise (non exhaustive list): disputes over inheritance; land/property boudaries; breach of land sale agreement or revocation; HLP disputes are context specific and should be identified at country level. C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, R4 Governance, S1 Shelter
ProtectionP3-PL3-2PL3 HLP DisputesNumber of HLP disputes addressed IndividualNumber n/a# of HLP disputes addressedGeographic; Administration; Type of displacement site; Age; Sex; Specific groups / categories of persons (ethnicity, religion, disability; etc.); Individual status (i.e. refugee, IDP, host community); Type of HLP dispute resolution mechanismNoOutputYesThere are different stages / steps in addressing HLP disputes, such as for example recording the dispute; referring the dispute to appropriate available support; dispute being processed; and dispute is resolved (agreement reached). Some HLP disputes will be recorded but may not imply further action and could thus be considered as "addressed"C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, R4 Governance, S1 Shelter
ProtectionP3-PL3-3PL3 HLP DisputesPercentage of operational HLP dispute resolution mechanisms within surveyed communitiesCommunityPercentageTotal # of national / local HLP dispute resolution mechanisms within surveyed communities# operational HLP dispute resolution mechanisms within surveyed communitiesGeographic; Administration; Type of HLP dispute resolution mechanism; Type of displacement siteYesBaselineNoHLP dispute resolution mechanisms include the statutory justice system (ex. land or housing commissions and tribunals) as well as customary bodies (ex: local committees/councils).C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, R4 Governance, S1 Shelter
ProtectionP3-PL3-4PL3 HLP DisputesNumber of HLP dispute resolution mechanisms provided with supportCommunityNumber # of HLP dispute resolution institutions provided with supportGeographic; Administration; Type of displacement site; Type of HLP dispute resolution mechanismNoOutputYesAppropriate in phases 2-4 of a new L3 emergency Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Support could be provided to HLP dispute resolution mechanisms in both areas directly and indirectly affected by the emergency i.e. areas where displaced populations are temporarily settled / hosted. Support to HLP dispute resolution mechanism include financial and material resources as well as technical advice. The type of support provided should be decided and appropriate at the local level. C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, R4 Governance, S1 Shelter
ProtectionP3-PL3-5PL3 HLP DisputesNumber of complaints/ disputes reported in relation to the use of land for humanitarian response activitiesFacilityNumbern/a# of complaints/disputes reported in relation to land used for humanitarian response activitiesGeographic; Administrative; Type of displacement site; Sector of humanitarian relief; Specific groups / categories of persons (ethnicity, religion, disability; etc.); Individual status (i.e. refugee, IDP, host community); YesBaselineNoAppropriate in phase 1 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1See above in regards to the "appropriateness" of land for humanitarian purposes, such as for camps, transitional shelter, temporary livelihoods, infrastructures, temprorary services (clinics, schools, water points, latrines, livestock pasture); etc..C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, R4 Governance, S1 Shelter, W7 Aggravating Factors
ProtectionP3-PL4-1PL4 Security of tenure for informal rights holders or vulnerable groupsNumber of interventions to improve land use and managementCommunityNumbern/a# of interventions to improve land use and management Geographic; Administrative; Type of displacement siteNoOutputYesAppropriate in phases 3-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 3, Phase 4HLP interventions to improve land use and management aim to reduce both the impact on the population of the current as well as future emergencies, notably by addressing issues related to human settlements located on hazardous or inappropriate land, as well as to the use of land for humanitarian response activities.C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, R4 Governance, S1 Shelter
ProtectionP3-PL4-2PL4 Security of tenure for informal rights holders or vulnerable groupsNumber of advocacy initiatives carried out to promote HLP rights and/or to ensure that HLP issues are addressedCommunityNumbern/a# of advocacy initiatives to promote HLP rights and/or to ensure HLP issues are addressed Geographic; Administrative; Type of displacement siteNoOutputYesAdvocacy initiatives could target a broad range of key stakeholders and decision makers involved in the emergency response through for example briefing with the Humanitarian Coordinator; donor consultations; workshops with government counterparts; etc. to develop or change existing policy in regards to HLPC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, S1 Shelter
ProtectionP3-PL4-3PL4 Security of tenure for informal rights holders or vulnerable groupsNumber and Percentage of surveyed persons / communities provided with access to information on HLP rights, referral services, and available supportHouseholds or CommunitiesNumber and PercentageTotal # of surveyed persons / communities affected by HLP issues or disputes # surveyed persons / communitities provided with HLP informationGeographic; Administration; Type of displacement site; Age; Sex; Specific groups / categories of persons (ethnicity, religion, disability; etc.); Individual status (i.e. refugee, IDP, host community)NoOutputYesAppropriate in phases 1-4 of a new L3 emergencyPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4HLP information could be provided through public media or other appropriate channels at national and local level. HLP information could cover for example: information on available services and support to address HLP disputes and other HLP issues. HLP information should be as much as possible provided in local language(s) in different formats (written; oral; visual) depending on context and target group. HLP information can target population directly and indirectly affected by the emergency (private landlords; relevant public authorities; etc.).C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, S1.1 Access
ProtectionP3-PL4-4PL4 Security of tenure for informal rights holders or vulnerable groupsNumber of targeted persons provided with HLP capacity building / trainingIndividualNumbern/a# of persons provided with HLP trainingGeographic; Administration; Age; Sex; Specific groups / categories of persons (ethnicity, religion, disability; etc.); Individual status (i.e. refugee, IDP, host community); Type of beneficiary (local, national, international)NoOutputYesHLP capacity building / training could include local, national and international actors involved in the humanitarian response. Beneficiaries could be local chiefs, religious leaders, national staff or representatives of the civil society or local/national governments. As part of the training evaluation, participants should be asked whether or not they feel better equipped to address HLP issues.C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P7 Documentation, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, S1 Shelter
ProtectionP4-PM1-1PM1 Clearance of Mines and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW)Percentage of land cleared of land mines and/or unexploded ordinancesCommunityMeasurement to be selected at national level, i.e. m2 or hectares Total land identified to be at risk of mine or UXO contamination Total land identified to be at risk of mine or UXO contamination which is cleared and being used for socio-economic purposesGeoraphical; Release status (land cleared and released by other means, land not cleared and released); Use of released land (land in use, land not in use); Types of land use (Accomodation, Production)YesOutcomeYesIMAS C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, PL2 Access to Land, PL3 HLP Disputes, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration
ProtectionP4-PM1-2PM1 Clearance of Mines and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW)Number or percentage of communities where presence of explosive remnants of war or unexploded amunitions/devices are reportedCommunityNumber or PercentageTotal population living in surveyed areaPopulation living in at risk areaGeography; Shelter type (Area of Origin, Camp, Temporary Shelter, Transit)YesBaseline, OutcomeYesIMAS The term "communities" should cover all sorts of concentrations of civilians (such as, for example IDP camps)C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F3 Food Access, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PL2 Access to Land, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, S1 Shelter
ProtectionP4-PM1-3PM1 Clearance of Mines and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW)Mechanism in place to collect, analyse and disseminate Mine/ERW data CommunityThis indicator can be measured with yes / no.n/aState collects, analyzes and disseminates data related to mine and ERW related disabilities disaggregated by age and gendern/aYesOutputYesIMAS IMSMA is the professional and widely used information management tool for mine action. This indicator shows whether IMSMA is in place or not.R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, S1 Shelter
ProtectionP4-PM2-1PM2 Mine and ERW risk educationNumber or percentage of persons trained on mine risk reduction CommunityNumber and Percentage AffectedTotal # of affected individuals# of affected individuals with the information needed to reduce personal risksGeography; Status (displaced, host family, etc.); sex, age YesOutputYesIMAS C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration
ProtectionP4-PM4-1PM4 Victim AssistanceNumber or percentage of survivors from mine/ERW incidents receiving supportThe rapid and effective intervention of victim assistance services to people injured by mine/ERW would reduce the incidence of death, limb lost or permanent injury, as well as psychological consequences of the trauma IndividualNumber and percentage (mine/ ERW survivors)Total number of survivors from mine/ ERW incidentsNumber of survivors from mine/ERW incidents receiving emergency medical care and psychological supportGeography (including communities affected); Age, sex YesOutputYesMine/ERW victims include survivors, but also the families and immediate community of those killed or injured by the explosion of mine and ERW. A system for data collection of those victimized has to be set as early as possible to ensure adequate and timely assistance is provided to victims. H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, PC1 Dangers and Injuries, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP5-1P5 VulnerabilityPercentage of female-headed householdsFemale heads of household can be especially vulnerable to certain types of GBV, such as sexual exploitation and abuse. HouseholdPercentage female headedtotal # of households# female-headed householdsGeographic unit YesBaseline, OutputC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, F3 Food Access, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery, S1.1 Access, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
ProtectionP5-10P5 VulnerabilityPercentage/number of reported incidence of intentional physical violence and other harmful practices [broken down by victim]CommunitySADDYesBaselineNoC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F3 Food Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
ProtectionP5-11P5 VulnerabilityPercentage of survivors of intentional physical violence and other harmful practices who are referred for supportIndividualSADDYesBaseline, OutputYesNeed to be disaggregated by age/gender; support is any service provision as defined by the country within the referral mechanims, i.e. legal, medical, psychosocial etc. C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F3 Food Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
ProtectionP5-2 P5 VulnerabilityPercentage of child headed householdsHouseholdgeographic unit ; sex and age YesBaseline, OutputC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, H2 Child health, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery, S1.1 Access, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
ProtectionP5-3P5 VulnerabilityPercentage of older people in need of assistance who are receiving specific supportdefinition of older people depends on context Individualsex/age/geographic unitYesOutputC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery, S1.1 Access, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
ProtectionP5-4P5 VulnerabilityPercentage of persons with disabilities identified in need of assistance who are receiving specific supportdisabitilites includes mental and physical disabilities Individualage/sex/geographic unit; type of supportYesOutput"Persons with disabilities" include those who have long-term or temporary physical, mental, intellectual or sensory impairments which, in interaction with various barriers, may hinder their full and effective participation in society on an equal basis with others.C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E4 Educational Policy, F3 Food Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery, S1.1 Access, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
ProtectionP5-5P5 VulnerabilityPercentage of persons identified in need of assistance receiving psychosocial supportPsychosocial support includes: counselling, therapy etc. by trained personnel Individualage/sex YesOutputC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E4 Educational Policy, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H4.3 Sexual violence, PC4 Psychosocial distress and mental disorders, PG3 Multi sectoral engagement (health, legal/justice, security, psychosocial), P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP5-6P5 VulnerabilityPercentage of health facilities providing access to preventing mother to child transmission services (PMTCT)Facilityyes/nogeographic unit YesBaseline, OutputC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.10 Service Provision - Health, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, E4 Educational Policy, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4.1 STI & HIV, P5 Vulnerability
ProtectionP5-7P5 VulnerabilityPercentage of communities providing access to voluntary counselling and testing servicesCommunityyes/nogeographic unit YesBaseline, OutputC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E4 Educational Policy, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4.1 STI & HIV, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP5-8P5 VulnerabilityPercentage of communities reporting the incidence of reported cases of trafficking for exploitation (labour or sex)CommunitySADDYesBaselineNothis excludes trafficking of babies, organs etc. C1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F3 Food Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP5-9P5 VulnerabilityPercentage of communities reporting the incidence of cases of abuse, violence or exploitation in need of assistance receiving support CommunitySADD/type of assistance YesBaseline, OutputNoa minimum requirement is that assistance is provided by same sex as appropriate and children are assisted by specialized partnersC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F3 Food Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H2 Child health, H4 Sexual and Reproductive Health, H5 Non communicable diseases and mental health, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P5 Vulnerability, (R) Early Recovery, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
ProtectionP6-1P6 Displacement and ReturnPercentage of communities reporting arbitrary restrictions on freedom of movementCommunitycamp/non-camp communitiesYesBaseline, Outputarbitrary restrictions for this purpose are those not provided for by law and those not necessary to protect security, public order, public health or morals and the rights of freedom of movement of others; must be based on credible reports C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP6-2P6 Displacement and ReturnNumber of [or percentage of] IDPs/affected population/returnees registeredDepending on the country context the indicator will trace number of total IDPs or the number of the "affected population" or returnees Communityage/sex YesBaseline, OutputDefinition for targeted/affected population etc. should be taken from the IASC Guidance on Humanitarian Profile C2 Population information management, F1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S3.1 Access
ProtectionP6-3P6 Displacement and ReturnDurable solutions strategy developed and agreed among all relevant stakeholdersyes/no; indicator to track the SG's decision on durable solutions where the protection cluster is responsible with UNDP to ensure that such a strategy exist Communityyes/nogeographic unit YesBaseline, OutputC1.2 CCCM Mechanisms, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, F2 Livelihood Assistance, (P) Protection, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R4 Governance
ProtectionP6-4P6 Displacement and ReturnDurable solutions strategy implemented and monitoredyes/no; indicator to track the SG's decision on durable solutions where the protection cluster is responsible with UNDP to ensure that such a strategy exist Communityyes/nogeographic unit YesBaseline, OutputC1.2 CCCM Mechanisms, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, F2 Livelihood Assistance, (P) Protection, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, R4 Governance
ProtectionP7-1P7 Documentation% of affected population lacking personal identity/civil documentspersonal/civil documentations includes birth registration, marriage certificate, land ownership documents etc. Householdgeographic unit/ age/sex, type of documentation YesBaseline, Outputfigures must be derived from survey or registration data C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery
ProtectionP7-2P7 DocumentationNumber of civil/individual documents issued/supported to be issuedIndividual or facilitytype of documents being issuedYesBaseline, OutputC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, P7 Documentation, (R) Early Recovery
Early RecoveryR-1R4 GovernanceNumber and Percentage of public sector employees (male/female) unavailable because of crisis by gender/grade or postNumber of public sector employees is one of crucial proxy indicators to the functioning of government in post crisis setting. Public sector employees may be unavailable because they or their families are directly affected by mortality or injury because of the crisis. They may also not be at work because their workplace building has been damaged or destroyed, because they cannot use transport networks to access their workplace, or because insecurity does not permit travel to work. EmployeesNumber and Percentage# of public sector employees pre-crisis# of public sector employeesa) general administration; b) civil registry; c) justice; d) civil protection; e) security; f) sex by gradeYesBaselineYesn/aPhase 1: Different data collection modules: i) To the extent possible obtain official figure from the treasury at central level or local level if possible; ii) Figures can be obtained from the media. Where possible obtain numbers of personnel from at least three separate sources and take the average. Obtain at least global data and disaggregated by sectors only when possible. Phase 2: Obtain data from authoritative / formal sources, determine the number at pre crisis level of employment, determine number at current level. Phase 3: Obtain data from authoritative / formal sources and corroborate with other formal reports/records. Phase 4: Conduct In-depth analysis based on formal records of the government disaggregated by sectorsPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4"Public sector" refer to sectors funded by a government budget at all levels of government, from national to local, within the defined areas affected by the crisis. "Available" refers to those being employed on regular basis of at least one month tenure. Data for this indicator can be available either at the administrative offices, the office where they should be working, or at the treasury.Data is usually available from past government reports or census.Number of public sector employees is one of crucial proxy indicators to the functioning of government in post crisis setting. Personnel management or human resources is a key component of public sector. As public sectors employees are often also affected by critical events, their availability is also affected. As situation stabilizes more employees are reaching the pre-crisis level.Government dataC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, F3 Food Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage
Early RecoveryR-10R2 Basic Infrastructure RestorationArea and Percentage of affected landmass with problematic rubble/debris present"Debris or rubble" is the material from the damage or destruction that results from some disasters. It includes wreckage from everything that could possibly be destroyed or damaged, as well as materials brought in by a catastrophic event. "Problematic" refers to situations where such debris causes immediate physical and psychological barriers for emergency relief and recovery activities. Affected areasMeters squared and percentagen/an/an/aYesBaseline, OutputYesn/aPhase 1: Determine if the catastrophic event/crisis generates debris; Information about type and intensity of hazards combined with the knowledge of existing vulnerability should guide the understanding about possibility of debris accumulation. Undertake assessment of the type of debris and its geographic distribution in the affected areas. Analyse the problematic characteristics of debris in terms of both ? the way the presence of accumulated debris hinders emergency response and recovery as well as the efforts required for debris management including collection, recycling and disposal. Determine the number of problematic sites in line with the common parameters (eg.. site location, type and volume/unit of debris, number of labours, crushers/tools etc.) of the humanitarian operation; Phase 2: Confirm the number of sites with the common parameters. Gather field information for verification of the problem characteristics of debris with greater detail of its management including availability of sites for preservation of re-usable building materials during recovery period. Assess spontaneous responses of the affected communities and identify if emergency response actions include debris management component; Phase 3: Verify the numbers of sites and estimations with formal records when necessary triangulate with field data and third party analysis; Phase 4: Conduct in depth analysis of the debris management in relation to other indicatorsPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4The type of debris varies considerably depending on the type of hazards and vulnerable objects in the communities. Often building materials and broken/ scattered remains form a major part of debris. Immediate clearance of debris becomes a pre-condition for restoration of accessibility in the affected sites. Debris management is a labour intensive process and offers employment opportunity for the unemployed labourers in the affected region. Recycling plays an important role for re-usable building materials from the debris/rubble. The key steps in the management of debris include collection (putting them together in certain places/points), clearance (putting them aside or stabilising unstable wreckages to ensure safe access), removal (taking them away from the site), recycling (salvaging or reusing), or disposal (taking the to the final solution) with the objectives of making debris no longer pose hindrance to humanitarian and recovery actions or obstacle and/or hazard to the crisis affected populations. Clearance of debris is a labour intensive process. It is important to assess the problems of debris and specify the number of problematic sites in accordance with geographic subdivision of the crisis-affected areas. Refer to the Guidelines for Dealing with Disaster Waste (forthcoming) being developed by UNEP/OCHA Environment Unit with the support of Swedish Civil Contingency Agency (MSB).Pre-crisis level information about land-use plan and built environment, types and use of building materials. Pre-crisis level information on unemployed day labourers including information about any cultural/religious barrier for woman to work outside their homes.n/aCommunity/ LGU surveyC4 Camp planning and durable solutions, H6 Environmental Health, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance
Early RecoveryR-11R2 Basic Infrastructure RestorationPercentage of debris collected which is recycled (e.g. for shelter, furniture, livelihoods production etc)Debris or rubble can be recycled for shelter purposes - e.g. timber and bricks can be used for shelter. Some timber can be recycled for furniture construction and other debris can be processed and sold and contribute to strengthening economic livelihoods. Create opportunities for women and vulnerable groups to engage and benefit from recycling. DebrisPercentagen/an/aage/gender-different groups of society will recycle different things egg rags for sanitary napkins, or children's toys can be made out of different items.YesOutputYesn/aPhase 1: in preliminary assessment determine the damage and losses (DALA) of materials Phase 2: together with local authorities and private sector and communities establish the type and amount material to be recycled. Phase 3: support the assessment, mapping, salvaging, transport and recycling mechanisms (roofing, shelter, construction, furniture, scrap metal, car repair etc.)Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3This indicator may be monitored together with the Shelter cluster or livelihoods clusters who support recycling of debris. For shelter purposes a standards and specs can be calculated. This can also be done for recycling for furniture and scrap metal (CGI) purposes. However the calculations will have to be done locally.n/aCluster members- programme monitoringC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3.11 Service Provision - Shelter, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, F2.3 In-kind Transfer, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance
Early RecoveryR-12R2 Basic Infrastructure RestorationNumber of safe waste disposal sites identified in each targeted debris removal areaDebris removal and processing, including debris recycling, can be critical to helping a population to recover from crisis. It can also be essential to dispose of debris that is blocking humanitarian actives. Safe and well managed disposal sites are key to debris removal. They have to be established in suitable locations, follow national safety rules and be able to process all of the debris removed. Waste disposal sitesNumbern/an/an/aYesOutputYesSelecting a safe disposal site for debris and rubble is important. This is done together with the local government and environmental experts to ensure that safety standards are adhered to. The approach will vary from context to context. The best solution should be found in the field together with partners.This indicator may be monitored together with the Shelter cluster or livelihoods clusters who support the clearing of roads and private housing as well as the processing of debris. There is no recommended number of sites per location required. The number of sites needed must be ascertained by specialist after estimating the amount of debris that needs removal and processing, and the context of the crisis.Cluster members -programme monitoringC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage
Early RecoveryR-13R2 Basic Infrastructure RestorationNumber and Percentage of population with access to basic community infrastructure not covered by other sectors or clusters, e.g. police stations, town halls, administrative buildings. Schools (if not covered by Edu), playgrounds, parksThe types of basic community infrastructure that is covered by the Early Recovery cluster will be decided in-country by the relevant cluster coordinators.  The accessibility of ER structures must then be estimated: access in disasters can be limited by the damage or destruction of a structure; by damage or destruction of the transport networks servicing the structure; or by insecurity, for example. Affected populationNumber and percentagen/an/aType of basic infrastructure, e.g. police stations, town halls, administrative buildings, schools (if not covered by Edu), playgrounds, parks, By age/gender/other diversity issues such as mobility. These different grounds have to have access to services such a women friendly police stations, girls friendly schools, or those that have mobility access routes.YesBaseline, OutputYesn/aPhase 1: Identify and assess the type and the extent of damages of the basic community infrastructure and their distribution in the affected communities. The sources of information are likely to be different for each type of basic community infrastructure and it is also important to determine the number of population served in the community by an affected basic infrastructure of each type. Determine the number or persons affected by the crisis ? refer to the common parameter (common dataset) adopted by the Humanitarian Country Team. Analyse the impacts in the lives and livelihoods of community population and determine the numbers and types of basic community infrastructure for which repair and reconstruction are critically important for livelihood recovery of the community population. Assess spontaneous responses of the affected communities and identify if emergency response actions include a component of restoration of basic community infrastructure. Phase 2: Verify the information about the types and number of basic infrastructure to improve the data disaggregation. Determine the number of population having access to basic infrastructure; Phase 3: Verify and update the numbers and types of basic community infrastructure based on the available report of comprehensive joint assessment such as PDNA. Improve the precision by documenting population's access to different types of basic infrastructure; Phase 4: Conduct in depth analysis of the basic community infrastructurePhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Standards and local customs to be defined according to context. Basic community infrastructure are small scale, low cost, and community self-constructed basic infrastructure, technical facilities and systems to ensure basic services and thus are critical for sustenance of lives and livelihood of the population. Access refers to populations ability to make use of or take advantage of basic infrastructure. Types of basic community infrastructure are locally determined, usually include but not limited to community access roads, small drainage and water structures, socio-economic infrastructures, communication and early warning, community non-conventional energy plants, and community small and micro enterprises. Recovery of basic community infrastructure should be guided by the participation and insights of the affected communities. The process should use labour-intensive technologies particular attention should be given to ensure that future disaster risks and minimised during recovery. The extent of damage may suitably be categorized as minor damage, partial damage and complete damage with the understanding that minor damage can be repaired with little efforts by the community themselves. In the absence of a country-wide established method, cross-sectoral and community consultation will be needed to draw a balanced perspective in devising a method of estimation for people's access with data disaggregated for each type of basic community infrastructure.Secondary data from National Statistical offices, special reports, report on community resources and risk mapping from local institutions, NGOs and Community Based Organisations. Statistical techniques may require to be applied for necessary extrapolation in preparing the baseline data.n/aCommunity/ LGU surveyE1 Access and Learning Environment, F3 Food Access, F5 Market Access, F7 Utilization, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P6 Displacement and Return, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage
Early RecoveryR-14R4 GovernanceNumber and location of community reconciliation efforts undertakenReconciliation efforts may be identified as a large range of initiatives, from local school-based exercises to formal, state-level peacebuilding activities. They should be monitored through the entities who undertake the activities, e.g. NGOs, women's groups, ethnic groups, state/non state actors, consultation of elders/community leaders, faith based organisations Reconciliation initiativesNumbern/an/aGeography, sex, age, diversity, state/non stateYesBaseline, OutputYesn/aPhase 1: stakeholder mapping and risk analysis Phase 2: efforts by humanitarian community either establish or reinforce reconciliation mechanisms Phase 3: establish the type of support needed for the reconciliation groups to reach their peace goalsPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3In order to do no harm - considerations should be made to understand the context, its players, existing capacities and resources and to build on services the community wants, rather than creating new services. Stakeholder mapping, context analysis, analysis of social grievances, monitoring and intensive negotiations with aggrieved groups to prevent outbreak of conflict. Dissemination of early warning indicators.Community/ LGU survey and/or cluster members - programme monitoringC4 Camp planning and durable solutions, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E2 Teaching and Learning, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, E4 Educational Policy, F4 Income Access, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance
Early RecoveryR-15R1 Economic Recovery and LivelihoodsNumber and Percentage of non-functioning marketsThis indicator must compare the number of pre-crisis markets with the number of markets operational after the disaster. It will require a level of interpretation - for example, a damaged market may re-open but show little buying and selling if cash is not available. MarketsNumber and percentage# of markets operational pre-crisis# of markets currently operationaln/aYesBaseline, OutputYesn/an/aThe ER Cluster must define carefully what constitutes a market in affected locations, before finding baseline information about pre-crisis markets and counting markets that are operational. n/an/aCommunity/ LGU surveyF1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return
Early RecoveryR-16R1 Economic Recovery and LivelihoodsNumber and Percentage of affected population with no access to any formal or informal financial serviceThis indicator must first assess the  type of financial services that were available to a population pre-crisis. These can include, for example, banks, phones,  family or community borrowing and trade. Affected populationNumber and percentage# people in population# of affected population with no access to any formal or informal financial serviceGeography, sex and ageYesBaseline, OutcomeYesn/an/aIn order to do no harm - attempt should be made to understand the context, its players, existing capacities and resources and to build on these rather than creating new systems. When reaching out to non state actors - ensure understanding, acceptance and agreement with the community.n/an/aHousehold surveyF1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance
Early RecoveryR-17R3 Capacity BuildingNumber and percentage of micro enterprise owners in affected areas recieved skills trainingMicro enterprise owners can be identified as people who own, operate and staff their own small and very small businesses.  If these enterprises are affected by disaster, the owners may benefit from skilling up in related or new trades Enterprise ownersNumber and percentageSexYesBaseline, OutputYesN/AN/APhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Trainees should be both men and women, and the training offered must be useful, relevant and enabling.Number of small and micro-enterprises registered at a local levelN/ALGU surveyF1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance
Early RecoveryR-18R3 Capacity BuildingNumber and percentage of CBO leaders in affected areas trained in disaster risk reduction and planningCommunity based organisation leaders can be defined as people who initiate adn manage community groups that benefit people in the community or neighbourhood. If these CBOs are either affected by disaster, or are contributing to humnaitarian response, then the leaders may benefit from skilling up. CBO leadersNumber and percentageSexYesBaseline, OutputYesN/AN/APhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Trainees should be both men and women, and the training offered must be useful, relevent and enabling.N/ACommunity/ LGU surveyF1 Food Assistance, F2 Livelihood Assistance, F3 Food Access, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, F6 Availability, F7 Utilization, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance
Early RecoveryR-2R4 GovernanceNumber and Percentage of affected areas with local government-led response planning capacity, with the ability to meet the needs of the enitre community in its diversity "Area"  refers to a government unit at the lowest level - usually a municipality/ town/ city. However, areas can be defined according to context. "Response Plan" is defined as the presence of a plan at local level, that indicates the relative readiness and capacity of the locality to undertake response and recovery activities. Affected areasAffected areas (Areas to be defined at the national level - whether regional, district or local level)# of affected areas# of affected areas with local government-led response planning capacityn/aYesOutputYesn/aPhase 1: Determine the lowest governance / administrative unit and the form of disaster/crisis related planning, e.g. preparedness or contingency planning, emergency response, or recovery plan. Count the number of localities that have completed their recovery plans; Phase 2: Count the number of locality that have completed their recovery plans; Phase 3: Count the number of locality that have completed their recovery plans; Phase 4: Count the number of locality that have completed their recovery plans.Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Recovery planning at this level usually has budgetary implications. This should not be confused with community level planning.Number of localities with either crisis/disaster preparedness and/or contingency plan that have recovery component in it.The earlier the locality has a recovery plan, the higher the chance for recovery success.Community/ LGU surveyC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, F3 Food Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage
Early RecoveryR-3R4 GovernanceNumber of affected areas with local government taking active planning/strategic measure to reduce the risk of disasters"Government-led" refers to a process that is either sanctioned, endorsed, or directly led by the government (including local government units) to have an effect on specific sectors. This indicator may include DRR, preparedness or contingency planning and practice. Affected areasNumber and Percentage: Affected areas (Areas to be defined at the national level - whether regional, district or local level)# of affected areas# of affeced areas with local government led DRR initiativesn/aYesOutputYesn/aThis indicator should be monitored together with other cluster/sector indicators on DRR as the DRR initiatives taken by local government may well support building disaster risk reduction capacity at sectorial level. This activity should take into account the variety of strengths and weakness of different parts of the community to ensure the plans are efficient and offer assistance to everyone.Recovery planning at this level usually has budgetary implications. This should not be confused with community level planning.n/an/aCommunity/ LGU surveyC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, F3 Food Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage
Early RecoveryR-4R4 GovernanceNumber of areas where local government across sectors use knowledge, innovation and education to build a culture of preparedness, safety and resilience. This is to be differentiated by age/sexThis could include relevant information on disasters is available and accessible at all levels, to all stakeholders (through networks, development of information sharing system. ii. School curricula, education material and relevant trainings include risk reduction and recovery concepts and practices. iii. Research methods and tools for multi risk assessments and cost benefit analysis are developed and strengthened. iv. Country wide public awareness strategy exists to stimulate a culture of disaster resilience, with outreach to urban and rural communities. Affected areasNumber and Percentage# of affected areas# of affected areas with local government-led intersectoral resilience building initiativesChildren, adults, elderly, vulnerableYesOutputYesn/aThis indicator should be monitored together with other cluster/sector indicators on DRR, where local knowledge, innovation and education has been used build resilience across sectors and building disaster risk reduction capacity at sectoral level. This activity should take into account the variety of strengths and weakness of different parts of the community to ensure the plans are efficient and offer assistance to everyone.Livelihood assets are (human, capital, natural, physical, social, or financial) resource base of the household that when combined with capabilities and activities will generate means of living, and if sustainable, generate the well being of a household. Livelihood assets are to be determined locally. e.g. Fishing boats for coastal community, land and agricultural implements in the hinterlands, education, skills and capitals in urban area, house, car, household utilities, land, physical infrastructure, social networks, associations, etc.n/an/aCommunity/ LGU surveyC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.1 Displacement Site Managers, C3.3 CCCM Mechanisms, C4 Camp planning and durable solutions, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, F3 Food Access, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P4 (PM) Mine Action, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance, W2 Water Supply, W3 Excreta Disposal, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage
Early RecoveryR-5R1 Economic Recovery and LivelihoodsNumber and Percentage of households in need of income supportHouseholds that are commonly in need of income support include those with no or very low income sources, female- or child- headed households and internally displaced people. HouseholdsPercentage# of Households in affected area# of Households in affected area in need of income supportSex (male-/female-headed household), and ageYesBaselineYesn/an/an/an/an/aHousehold surveyC2 Population information management, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, F4 Income Access, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance
Early RecoveryR-6R1 Economic Recovery and LivelihoodsNumber and Percentage of households with no income sources provided with income support (transfer or generation)After an emergency, the livelihoods of a household may be suspended or destroyed. The kinds of households affected, and the kinds of support they need, will be different in different contexts. HouseholdsNumber and Percentagen/an/aSex (male-/female-headed household), and ageYesOutputYesn/aPhase 1: Establish the estimated number and characteristics of households whose income is affected by the crisis to establish the scale of impact on livelihood Identify emergency responses (e.g.. cash/food for work, emergency response-related employment, grants scheme, livelihoods start-up packs/kits etc.) that has income transfer and / or income generation scheme and estimate the coverage; Phase 2: Update the estimated number and characteristics of households whose income is affected by the crisis to establish the scale of impact on livelihood. Update the emergency responses that have cash transfer and / or income generation scheme and estimate the coverage. Identify responses that can evolve into sustainable income and employment and share information with development actors to ensure linkage to long term recovery; Phase 3: Verify the estimations with formal records ? when necessary triangulate with field data and third party analysis; Phase 4: Conduct in depth sectoral analysis.Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Disaster/conflict affect peoples access to income and sustainable employment. This should take into account the varying needs, skills and social norms to ensure equitable access. Distinction has to be made between having no income even before the crisis and losing income due to the impact of crisis. This indicator focuses on the former.Pre-crisis census, other official reports, or media quoted household income types and levels. Determine rapidly the crisis? impacts on livelihood, to the extent possible specified by sectors/type of employment, geographical area, and population segment based on damage assessment report, economic/social welfare authorities, and / or other analysis such as livelihoods assessments (See ILO/FAO Guide on Livelihoods Assessments, 2008), Household Economy Analysis, or Household profiling. Incorporate basic conflict/disaster risk analysis as part of the overall assessments on livelihoods.n/aCluster members- programme monitoringC2 Population information management, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, F2.1 Cash Transfer, F2.2 Voucher Transfer, F2.3 In-kind Transfer, F4 Income Access, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance
Early RecoveryR-7R1 Economic Recovery and LivelihoodsNumber and Percentage of households with no livelihood assetsAfter an emergency, the livelihood assets of a household may be damaged, destroyed or killed (in the case of livestock). The kinds of assets affected, and the kinds of support the affected households need, will be different in different contexts. HouseholdsNumber and Percentage# of crisis affected households# of crisis affected households with no livelihood assetsSex (male-/female-headed household), and ageYesBaseline, OutputYesn/aPhase 1: Determine which livelihood sectors and estimate the number of households affected by the crisis. Establish up to five most critical livelihood assets associated with the livelihood sectors affected by the crisis. Determine if there are livelihood assets component in any emergency response measures and estimate the number of households that benefitted in terms of receiving livelihood assets from such measures. Livelihoods assessment that include wealth ranking can be done periodically to monitor replacement and replenishment of assets through emergency response. Incorporate a basic disaster/conflict risk analysis as part of the livelihoods assessments; Phase 2: Update the estimated number and characteristics of households whose income is affected by the crisis to establish the scale of impact on livelihood. Update the emergency responses that has income transfer and / or income generation scheme and estimate the coverage. Determine that interventions are conflict and disaster risk sensitive. Determine households and individuals already engaged in self employment and wage employment due to crisis response. Document set of assets acquired due to crisis response activities. Compile the information on income earning opportunities, and assets replacement/replenishment levels, and share this with recovery and development actors, where possible; Phase 3: verify the estimations with formal records, when necessary triangulate with field data and third party analysis. Share information with other stakeholders to enable the link between early and long term recovery; Phase 4: Conduct in depth sectoral analysisPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Livelihood assets are (human, capital, natural, physical, social, or financial) resource base of the household that when combined with capabilities and activities will generate means of living, and if sustainable, generate the well being of a household. Livelihood assets are to be determined locally. e.g. Fishing boats for coastal community, land and agricultural implements in the hinterlands, education, skills and capitals in urban area, house, car, household utilities, land, physical infrastructure, social networks, associations, etc.Pre-crisis census on types of livelihood to the extent possible at household level. Official pre-crisis reports describing economic assets of the crisis-affected areas. Livelihoods assessment that include wealth ranking in pre-crisis situations; Ensure assessments incorporate basic disaster risk/conflict analysis to ensure crisis sensitivity.This will be specified in the guidance per phase: e.g. household goods, income, shelter/housing, domestic animals, etc.Household surveyC2 Population information management, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, F2.1 Cash Transfer, F2.2 Voucher Transfer, F2.3 In-kind Transfer, F4 Income Access, F5 Market Access, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance
Early RecoveryR-8R1 Economic Recovery and LivelihoodsPercentage of economically active workforce that is employed on: a) a short term/ temporary basis; and b) a long term/ permanent basis"Employment" is defined broadly here as work that is paid, either formally or informally. It can allow households to be self sufficient and further, can allow them to build their resilience in the face of disasters. Long term work increases these positives. Affected populationNumber and Percentage(Total workforce) # of people in economically active workforce(Employed workers) # of people in economically active workforce that is employed on: a) a short term/ temporary basis; and b) a long term/ permanent basis. Consider the influence of the unofficial sector, such as street selling of goods. Sex, AgeYesBaseline, OutcomeYesn/aPhase 1: Update the estimated number and characteristics of persons whose employment is affected by the crisis to establish the scale of impact. Update the emergency responses and other measures that has employment generation and estimate the coverage. Undertake rough and quick hazard mapping and conflict analysis and ensure that short and long term employment are crisis sensitive; Phase 3: Verify the estimations with formal records when necessary triangulate with field data and third party analysis. Document information and share with recovery and development partners to ensure sustainable recovery support; Phase 4: Conduct in depth sectoral analysisPhase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4Employment is work or occupational activities to which one is used or being paid wage/salary. Short term refers to gainful engagement between 1 to12 months?; long term is an engagement with tenure more than one year. Engagement that is less than 1 month, in this case, shouldn't be considered as employment. Eligible workforce refers to the number of people of working age and below retirement age who are expected to be actively in the gainful work activities or are actively seeking employment.Census or other formal records on percentage of employment, usually at the labour statistics, statistics office, or at the general administration office, to the extent possible disaggregated by type/sector and gender. Determine impact of the crisis on employment differentiated by types/sectors. Determine possible sectors that might require labour intensive work through e.g. cash for work. Determine level of demand for goods and services; Document month by moth inflation.n/an/aC2 Population information management, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, F4 Income Access, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, (S) Emergency Shelter and NFI, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance
Early RecoveryR-9R2 Basic Infrastructure RestorationNumber and Percentage of population directly affected by problematic rubble/debris"Debris or rubble" is the material from the damage or destruction that results from some disasters. It includes wreckage from everything that could possibly be destroyed or damaged, as well as materials brought in by a catastrophic event. "Problematic" refers to situations where such debris causes immediate physical and psychological barriers for emergency relief and recovery activities. Affected populationNumber and Percentage# of crisis-hit people# of crisis-hit people directly affected by rubble/ debrisGeography, sex and ageYesBaseline, Outcome, OutputYesn/aTaking gender/age and other diversity issues into account will allow for the prioritization of clearance based on needs of the most vulnerable. Pre-crisis/Baseline, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4The guidance per phase will specify alternatively roads, services, etc.: Depending on the situation and phase, the following might be taking into account: number of people affected by debris (example : 1 million people/60% of the population of a city affected by debris)n/an/aHousehold surveyC4 Camp planning and durable solutions, E1 Access and Learning Environment, E3 Teachers & other education personnel, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H6 Environmental Health, P4 (PM) Mine Action, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, P7 Documentation, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, S3.1 Access, S3.2 Assistance
Emergency Shelter and NFIS1-1-1S1.1 AccessNumber and percentage of households in need of shelter assistanceThis indicator aims to identify the caseload for the shelter response, within the overall population affected by the emergency. HouseholdNumber and percentageTotal number of surveyed householdsNumber of households in need of shelter assistanceType of shelter assistance needed (cash; material; labour; other); Sex and age; Household tenure situation (owner / owner-occupier; renter; no tenure); Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family); YesBaseline, OutcomeSphere: Shelter and settlement standard 1: Strategic planningFor Standards: See also: Sphere: Shelter and settlement standard 1: Strategic planning, key indicator 1: Shelter and settlement solutions to meet the essential needs of all the disasteraffected population are agreed with the population themselves and relevant authorities in coordination with all responding agencies (see guidance note 1)C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.11 Service Provision - Shelter, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, E1.1 Equal Access, PL1 HLP Documentation, PL2 Access to Land, PL3 HLP Disputes, P5 Vulnerability, W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality, W2.3 Water Facilities, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors
Emergency Shelter and NFIS1-1-2S1.1 AccessNumber and percentage of households indicating shelter as a priority needThis indicators collects information on the priority support requested by affected households in order to meet their shelter-related needs. Shelter needs should be disaggregated to capture various solutions HouseholdNumber and percentageTotal number of surveyed householdsNumber of households indicating shelter as a priority needSex and age; Household tenure situation (owner / owner-occupier; renter; no tenure); Type of settlement or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family)YesBaseline, OutcomeSphere: Shelter and settlement standard 1: Strategic planningFor STANDARDS: See also: Sphere: Shelter and settlement standard 1: Strategic planning, key indicator 1: Shelter and settlement solutions to meet the essential needs of all the disasteraffected population are agreed with the population themselves and relevant authorities in coordination with all responding agencies (see guidance note 1).E1.1 Equal Access, PL1 HLP Documentation, PL2 Access to Land, PL3 HLP Disputes, P5 Vulnerability, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, W7 Aggravating Factors
Emergency Shelter and NFIS1-1-3S1.1 AccessNumber and percentage of damaged houses / dwellings This indicator focuses on the impact of the crisis / disaster on housing structures by degree of damage, enabling the development of a well targetted shelter response and associated response monitoring. Shelter damage category are to be defined at country level as relevant. It is recommended to have three to five levels of damage. (1) No Damage; (2) Partially Damaged; (3) Completely Destroyed.HouseNumber Total number of surveyed houses / dwellingsNumber of damaged houses / dwellings Settlement type (urban / rural; formal / informal; etc.); Housing type (house / appartment); Household tenure situation (owner / owner-occupier / renter; no tenure); Sex and age YesBaseline, Outcome(R) Early Recovery, W7 Aggravating Factors
Emergency Shelter and NFIS1-1-4S1.1 AccessAverage cost of housing construction materials The average cost of commonly-used housing construction material should be tracked over time as a key indicator of availability and accessibility of such items ; as well as the impact on the market of in kind humanitarian aid on such items CommunityNumberCosts of essential shelter materials Pre / Post emergency prices (including evolution over time from emergency onset); types of materialYesBaselineF3 Food Access
Emergency Shelter and NFIS1-2-1S1.2 AssistanceNumber and percentage of households having received shelter assistanceThis indicator aims to gather disaggregated data on number households supported with shelter assistance grounded in relevant sector standards HouseholdNumber and percentageTotal number of affected householdsNumber of households having received shelter assistanceType of shelter assistance received (cash; material; labour; transportation; other); Shelter damage category; Sex and age; Household tenure situation (owner / owner-occupier; renter; no tenure); Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family); Type of response provider (local, national, or international; governmental or NGO; faith-based or secular; etc.) YesOutputYesC3.11 Service Provision - Shelter, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, (R) Early Recovery, W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality, W2.3 Water Facilities, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage, W7 Aggravating Factors
Emergency Shelter and NFIS1-2-10S1.2 AssistancePercentage of shelter interventions taking into account impact on the environmentShelter cluster or relevant shelter sector coordination mechanism should define context-specific and measurable indicators with related guidance for assessing the impact of shelter solutions on the environment. Consider unsustainable resource use, encroachment in sensitive areas, use of environmentally friendly construction techniques, and land degradation issues (loss of forest, mangrove, or wetland) CommunityPercentage Total number of shelter interventions Number of shelter interventions taking into account impact on the environment Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family); Type of shelter intervention; Type of shelter responder (local, national, or international; governmental or non-governmental; faith-based or secular; etc.) YesOutcomeYes
Emergency Shelter and NFIS1-2-2S1.2 Assistance Average covered living area per person among population receiving shelter assistanceThe indicator captures the population density within the provided shelter solutions. Note that Sphere standards are of 3.5 m2 per person m2/personNumber Average covered living area per person Shelter damage category;Type and source of shelter assistance received; Sex and age; Household tenure situation (owner / owner-occupier; renter; no tenure); Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family); YesOutcomeYesC2 Population information management, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.11 Service Provision - Shelter
Emergency Shelter and NFIS1-2-3S1.2 AssistancePercentage of beneficiary households using shelter assistance as a means to address other needs This indicator evaluates the appropriateness of the type of assistance provided. Beneficiaries of shelter assistance may have used the assistance they receive(d) for a different purpose than originally intended. For instance, beneficiaries may sell or exchange shelter materials in order to address other humanitarian needs such as food, water or health. HouseholdPercentage Total number of households receiving shelter assistance Number of beneficiary households using shelter assistance as a means to address other needs Type and source of shelter support received; Shelter damage category; Sex and age ; Household tenure situation (owner / owner-occupier; renter; no tenure); Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family); Type of shelter responder (national or international; governmental or non-governmental; etc.) YesOutcomeYesF3 Food Access, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods
Emergency Shelter and NFIS1-2-4S1.2 AssistanceNumber of persons / households / communities provided with training related to shelter assistance Shelter and non-food item (including energy) training could cover a broad range of issues within the shelter sector. As part of the training evaluation, participants should be asked whether or not they have implemented the learnings from the training. person / household / communityNumberNumber of persons / households / communities provided with training related to shelter assistance Type and theme of training; Age; Sex; Specific groups / categories of persons (ethnicity, religion, disability; etc.); Individual status (i.e. refugee, IDP, host community)YesOutputYesPL4 Security of tenure for informal rights holders or vulnerable groups, (R) Early Recovery
Emergency Shelter and NFIS1-2-5S1.2 AssistanceNumber and percentage of households having recovered adequate shelter without external support This indicator measures the degree of self-recovery among the affected household in terms of their shelter situation. For this indicator, shelter actors should define and agree at country level on what is an adequate shelter in this specific context HouseholdNumber and PercentageTotal numer of of surveyed households Number of households having recovered adequate shelter without external support Shelter damage category; Sex and age; Household tenure situation (owner / owner-occupier; renter; no tenure); Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family); YesOutcomeYesR1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, W7 Aggravating Factors
Emergency Shelter and NFIS1-2-6S1.2 AssistancePercentage of shelter interventions incorporating hazard mitigation measuresThis indicator aims to evaluate how a disaster risk reduction (DRR) is applied in the shelter response with the aim strengthen the resilience of affected households, specifically in contexts where disasters associated with natural and climate-related hazards are recurrent. Appropriate hazard mitigation measures should be defined/identified at country level. CommunityPercentageTotal number of shelter interventionsNumber of shelter interventionsType of shelter interventions (self-recovery or external support); Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family); Type of response provider (local, national, or international; governmental or non-governmental; faith-based or secular; etc.) YesOutcomeYesR3 Capacity Building
Emergency Shelter and NFIS1-2-7S1.2 AssistancePercentage of shelter solutions incorporating measures to prevent/mitigate security risks, in particular gender based violence, for beneficiary householdsThis indicators aims to evaluate how security risks, and in particular gender based violence, are addressed as part of the shelter and non-food item support provided to beneficiary households, especially the most vulnerable households such as women-headed households. HouseholdPercentageTotal number of shelter interventionsNumber of shelter interventionsType of security measures implemented as part of the shelter solutions (doors, locks, fixed lighting, flashlights, portable radios, re-inforced shelter structure/cover material, etc.); Sex and age; Household tenure situation (owner / owner-occupier; renter; no tenure); Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family); Type of response provider (national or international; governmental or non-governmental; etc.) YesOutcomePG5 Data collection, storage and sharing, (R) Early Recovery
Emergency Shelter and NFIS1-2-8S1.2 AssistancePercentage of shelter solutions incorporating accessibility measures for people with specific needsThis indicators aims to evaluate how the settlement solution is inclusive, and in particular physical accessibility, are addressed as part of the shelter support provided to beneficiary households, especially those including persons with specific needs such as persons living with disabilities, older persons, children, etc. HouseholdPercentageTotal number of shelter interventionsNumber of shelter interventionsType of measures implemented as part of shelter solution provided with an accessible approach (steps, handrails, ramp, dors, locks); Sex and age; Household tenure situation (owner / owner-occupier; renter; no tenure); Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family); Type of response provider (national or international; governmental or non-governmental; etc.)YesOutcomeP5 Vulnerability
Emergency Shelter and NFIS1-2-9S1.2 AssistancePercentage of beneficiary households satisfied with the shelter assistance they receive(d)The indicator enables beneficiaries of shelter to feedback on the degree of satisfaction on the assistance received HouseholdPercentage Total number of households receiving shelter assistance number of beneficiary households satisfied with the shelter assistance they receive(d)Type and source of shelter assistance received; Sex and age; Household tenure situation (owner / owner-occupier; renter; no tenure); Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family); Type of shelter responder (national or international; governmental or non-governmental; etc.) YesOutcomeYesPL1 HLP Documentation, PL2 Access to Land, PL3 HLP Disputes, PL4 Security of tenure for informal rights holders or vulnerable groups, P5 Vulnerability
Emergency Shelter and NFIS2-1-1S2.1 AccessNumber and percentage of households in need of non-food itemsThis indicator identifies the overall caseload for the NFI response. HouseholdNumber and Percentage Total number of surveyed householdsNumber of households in need of non-food itemsType of non-food item needed; Sex and age; Household tenure situation (owner / owner-occupier; renter; no tenure); Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family) YesBaseline, OutcomeSphere NFI standard 1N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods, W1.1 Hygiene items, W2.1 Access and Water Quantity, W2.2 Water Quality, W2.3 Water Facilities, W3.1 Environment, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage
Emergency Shelter and NFIS2-1-3S2.1 AccessAverage cost of shelter-related non-food itemsThe average cost of essential shelter-related NFI should be tracked over time as a key indicator of availability and accessibility of such items ; as well as the impact on the market of in kind humanitarian aid on such items CommunityNumberCosts of essential NFI materialsPre / Post emergency prices (including evolution over time from emergency onset); types of materialYesBaselineF3 Food Access
Emergency Shelter and NFIS2-2-1S1.2 AssistanceNumber and percentage of households receiving non-food itemsThis indicator aims to gather disaggregated data on number households supported with NFIs. Overall number of NFIs delivered should also be collected HouseholdNumber and Percentage Total number of affected householdsNumber of households having received non-food itemsType and source of non-food item received; Sex and age; Household tenure situation (owner / owner-occupier; renter; no tenure); Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family) YesOutputYesC3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, F1 Food Assistance, N3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, W1.1 Hygiene items, W2.2 Water Quality, W2.3 Water Facilities, W3.1 Environment, W3.2 Toilet Facilities, W4 Vector Control, W5 Solid Waste Management, W6 Drainage
Emergency Shelter and NFIS2-2-2S2.2 AssistanceNumber of persons / households / communities provided with training related to non-food item assistance Non-food item training could cover a broad range of issues within the shelter sector. As part of the training evaluation, participants should be asked whether or not they have implemented the learnings from the training. person / household / communityNumberNumber of persons / households / communities provided with training related to NFI assistance Type and theme of training; Age; Sex; Specific groups / categories of persons (ethnicity, religion, disability; etc.); Individual status (i.e. refugee, IDP, host community)YesOutputSphere: NFI standard 5: Tools and fixings, Key Indicator 2For STANDARDS: See also: Sphere: NFI standard 5: Tools and fixings, Key Indicator 2: All households or community groups have access to training and awareness-raising in the safe use of tools and fixings provided.(R) Early Recovery
Emergency Shelter and NFIS2-2-3S2.2 AssistancePercentage of beneficiary households using shelter-related NFI assistance as a means to address other needs This indicator evaluates the appropriateness of the type of assistance provided. Beneficiaries of shelter-related non-food item assistance may have used the assistance they receive(d) for a different purpose than originally intended. For instance, beneficiaries may sell or exchange non food items in order to address other humanitarian needs such as food, water or health. HouseholdPercentageTotal number of households receiving NFI assistance Number of beneficiary households using NFI assistance as a means to address other needs Type and source of NFI support received; Shelter damage category; Sex and age ; Household tenure situation (owner / owner-occupier; renter; no tenure); Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family); Type of shelter responder (national or international; governmental or non-governmental; etc.) YesOutcomeF3 Food Access, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods
Emergency Shelter and NFIS2-2-4S2.2 AssistancePercentage of shelter-related non-food item interventions taking into account impact on the environment Shelter cluster or relevant shelter sector coordination mechanism should define context-specific and measurable indicators with related guidance for assessing the impact of shelter solutions on the environment. Consider unsustainable resource use, encroachment in sensitive areas, use of environmentally friendly construction techniques, and land degradation issues (loss of forest, mangrove, or wetland) CommunityPercentageTotal number of NFI interventionsNumber of NFI interventions taking into account impact on the environment Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family); Type of shelter intervention; Type of shelter responder (local, national, or international; governmental or non-governmental; faith-based or secular; etc.) YesOutcomeYes(R) Early Recovery
Emergency Shelter and NFIS2-2-5S2.2 AssistancePercentage of beneficiary households satisfied with the shelter-related non-food items they receive(d)The indicator enables beneficiaries of NFI to feedback on the degree of satisfaction on the assistance received HouseholdPercentage Total number of households receiving NFI assistance number of beneficiary households satisfied with the NFI assistance they receive(d)Type and source of NFI assistance received; Sex and age; Household tenure situation (owner / owner-occupier; renter; no tenure); Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family); Type of shelter responder (national or international; governmental or non-governmental; etc.) YesOutcomeYes
Emergency Shelter and NFIS3-1-1S3.1 AccessNumber and percentage of affected households requiring assistance to cover their energy needs This indicator identifies the overall caseload for supporting energy requirements of affected populations. Energy needs include all activities for which households need fuel: cooking, heating, lighting, etc. It is particularly imporatnt to track where winterisation interventions are planned. It is important to collect information separately from men and women as they have differing energy needs. HouseholdNumber and percentageTotal number of surveyed householdsNumber of households requiring assistance to cover energy needsType of energy support (different stoves / fuel types; etc); Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family) YesBaseline, OutcomeSphere: NFI standard 4: Stoves, fuel and lightingN3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods
Emergency Shelter and NFIS3-1-3S3.1 AccessAverage cost of shelter-related energy / fuelThe average cost of essential shelter-related energy/fuel (e.g. wood, gas, charcoal) should be tracked over time as a key indicator of availability and accessibility of such items ; as well as the impact on the market of in kind humanitarian aid on such items CommunityNumberCosts of essential energy materialsPre / Post emergency prices (including evolution over time from emergency onset); types of materialYesBaselineF3 Food Access, F7 Utilization
Emergency Shelter and NFIS3-2-1S3.2 AssistanceNumber and percentage of affected households provided with assistance to cover energy needsThis indicator aims to gather disaggregated data on number households supported with energy assistance. It is important to collect information separately from men and women as they will have received different types of energy support. HouseholdNumber and percentageTotal number of affected householdsNumber of affected households provided with assistance to cover energy needsType of energy support (different stoves / fuel types; etc); Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family); Type of response provider (national or international; governmental or non-governmental; etc.)YesOutputYesN3 Prevention and Control of Micronutrients Deficiencies
Emergency Shelter and NFIS3-2-2S3.2 AssistanceNumber of persons / households / communities provided with training related to energy/fuel assistance Energy/fuel training could cover a broad range of issues within the shelter sector. As part of the training evaluation, participants should be asked whether or not they have implemented the learnings from the training. person / household / communityNumberNumber of persons / households / communities provided with training related to energy/fuel assistance Type and theme of training; Age; Sex; Specific groups / categories of persons (ethnicity, religion, disability; etc.); Individual status (i.e. refugee, IDP, host community)YesOutput(R) Early Recovery
Emergency Shelter and NFIS3-2-3S3.2 AssistancePercentage of beneficiary households using shelter-related energy/fuel assistance as a means to address other needs This indicator evaluates the appropriateness of the type of assistance provided. Beneficiaries of shelter-related energy/fuel assistance may have used the assistance they receive(d) for a different purpose than originally intended. For instance, beneficiaries may sell or exchange fuel in order to address other humanitarian needs such as food, water or health. HouseholdPercentageTotal number of households receiving energy/fuel assistance Number of beneficiary households using energy/fuel assistance as a means to address other needs Type and source of energy/fuel support received; Shelter damage category; Sex and age ; Household tenure situation (owner / owner-occupier; renter; no tenure); Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family); Type of shelter responder (national or international; governmental or non-governmental; etc.) YesOutcomeF3 Food Access, R1 Economic Recovery and Livelihoods
Emergency Shelter and NFIS3-2-4S3.2 AssistancePercentage of shelter-related energy/fuel interventions taking into account impact on the environment Shelter cluster or relevant shelter sector coordination mechanism should define context-specific and measurable indicators with related guidance for assessing the impact of shelter solutions on the environment. Consider unsustainable resource use, encroachment in sensitive areas, use of environmentally friendly construction techniques, and land degradation issues (loss of forest, mangrove, or wetland) CommunityPercentageTotal number of energy/fuel interventionsNumber of energy/fuel interventions taking into account impact on the environment Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family); Type of shelter intervention; Type of shelter responder (local, national, or international; governmental or non-governmental; faith-based or secular; etc.) YesOutcomeYesR2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration
Emergency Shelter and NFIS3-2-5S3.2 AssistancePercentage of beneficiary households satisfied with the shelter-related energy suppprt they receive(d)The indicator enables beneficiaries of energy to feedback on the degree of satisfaction on the assistance received HouseholdPercentage Total number of households receiving energy assistance number of beneficiary households satisfied with the energy assistance they receive(d)Type and source of energy/fuel assistance received; Sex and age; Household tenure situation (owner / owner-occupier; renter; no tenure); Type of settlement (urban / rural; formal / informal) or displacement site/situation (self-settled / planned camp; collective centre; host family); Type of shelter responder (national or international; governmental or non-governmental; etc.) YesOutcomeYes
Emergency TelecommunicationsT-1T1 ICT PerformanceNumber of common operational areas covered by common security telecommunication networkdeployment of servicesFacilityLocation / Operational Areasn/aYesOutputYesETC services are deployed in defined ‘common operational areas', i.e. areas approved by the Humanitarian Country Team in which the majority of United Nations (UN) agencies and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) are based.ETC ReportsT1 ICT Performance
Emergency TelecommunicationsT-2T1 ICT PerformanceNumber of common operational areas covered by data communications servicesdeployment of servicesFacilityLocation / Operational Areasn/aYesOutputYesETC services are deployed in defined ‘common operational areas', i.e. areas approved by the Humanitarian Country Team in which the majority of United Nations (UN) agencies and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) are based.ETC ReportsT1 ICT Performance
Emergency TelecommunicationsT-3T1 ICT PerformanceNumber of UN agency/NGO staff members trained on ETC servicestrainingIndividualHumanitarian Staff membersn/aYesOutputYesETC services are deployed in defined ‘common operational areas', i.e. areas approved by the Humanitarian Country Team in which the majority of United Nations (UN) agencies and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) are based.ETC ReportsT1 ICT Performance
Emergency TelecommunicationsT-4T2 ETC CoordinationInformation Management and collaboration platform established and maintained up-to-dateIMOthercollaboration platformn/aYesOutputYesETC services are deployed in defined ‘common operational areas', i.e. areas approved by the Humanitarian Country Team in which the majority of United Nations (UN) agencies and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) are based.ETC ReportsT2 ETC Coordination
Emergency TelecommunicationsT-5T1 ICT PerformancePercentage of users reporting delivery of the service as “satisfactory” and within “satisfactory” timeframeCommon Cluster monitoring - All emergencies - 1 per year/ cycleIndividualPercentage per Surveyn/aYesOutcomeYesETC services are provided to humanitarian actors in the field. Cluster monitoring tool T2 ETC Coordination
Water Sanitation HygieneW 6-1W6 DrainagePresence of stagnant water on and around the siteA substantial presence may be a large body of standing water such as a pond, a high density of small areas such as water standing in tyre tracks. If the standing water is contaminated wastewater then even small quantities should be considered as significant. Small puddles of rainwater that dry up after a day or so should not be considered a substantial presence. CommunitySubtantial presence / No Substantial PresenceN/AN/AN/ABaseline, OutcomeSPHEREN/AStagnant water may include wastewater, rainwater, natural water bodies and standing water that remains after flooding. The presence of substantial quantities of standing water in and around a site, particularly near living areas and drinking water sources creates a risk to public health through faecal contamination (wastewater and run-off may often be faecal contaminated), the creation of vector breeding sites (for mosquitoes, flies etc.), drowning hazard etc. Although mosquitoes and other insect vectors may travel up to several kilometres from their breeding sites, the closer people are to the breeding sites the more likely it is that there will be contact with the vectors. For most concentrated settlements, standing water that is at least 30m from living areas is effectively outside the perimeter of the settlement.N/AN/AObservationH6 Environmental Health, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, E1 Access and Learning Environment, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition
Water Sanitation HygieneW 7-1W7 Aggravating FactorsPresence of faecal-oral diseasesFaecal-oral diseases are those diseases that are transmitted by faecal material passing into the mouth, principally via contaminated water, hands and food, and are prevented by improvements in water supply, sanitation and hygiene. The most important of these diseases in most emergencies are various diarrhoeal diseases. Diseases with outbreak risk are those that may spread rapidly and require a rapid response to protect public health. They include cholera, typhoid, shigellosis, and hepatitis A and E.CommunityOutbreak or epidemic, of faecal-oral disease / High or significantly increasing faecal-oral disease incidence rates / Stable background incidence of faecal-oral diseaseN/AN/APrevalence and incidence rates, disaggregated by sex and ageBaselineN/AThe greater the presence of faecal-oral diseases in a population, the greater the risks created by deficiencies in WASH conditions and the higher the priority that should be given to addressing those deficiencies. In addition, persistent high levels of faecal-oral disease in a population indicate ongoing problems with access to WASH facilities and servicesN/AKey informantC3.2 Service Provision - WASH, (R) Early Recovery, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition
Water Sanitation HygieneW 7-2W7 Aggravating FactorsExtent of global acute malnutrition and food insecurityThe global acute malnutrition rate is the percentage of under-five children below 80% (or below -2Z scores) weight for height and/or with oedema. In the acute stages of an emergency this rate may be estimated approximately in a rapid nutritional assessment with a MUAC (mid-upper arm circumference) survey by nutrition staff.CommunityLow/ Moderate/ High/ Very HighN/AN/Adisaggregated by sex and ageBaselineN/AMalnutrition and lack of food increase vulnerability to WASH-related diseases and are a key factor in determining the priority of intervention. In addition, acute food insecurity is likely to oblige people to trade resources, including items such as soap, water containers and mosquito nets, in exchange for food.N/AN/AKey informantF3 Food Access, (R) Early Recovery, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition
Water Sanitation HygieneW 7-3W7 Aggravating FactorsAccess to health serviceHealth services are preventive and clinical services that aim to address the main causes of excess mortality and morbidity present in the given context. Access is the ability of the affected population to use to, or be covered by, those services. This may be limited by the capacity of health services (human resources, supplies and equipment, systems and procedures) in relation to the population to be served, and by distance, cost, social exclusion, lack of information etc.CommunityAccess / No or Limited AccessN/AN/AN/ABaselineN/AAccess to health services is a key factor for determining the priority of a WASH intervention. Where access is limited, WASH conditions become more important in influencing mortality and morbidity.N/AN/AKey informantH1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, (R) Early Recovery, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition
Water Sanitation HygieneW 7-4W7 Aggravating FactorsDensity of settlement in m2 of total site area per personThe total site area per person includes shelter plots, and the space needed for roads, footpaths, schools, sanitation, firebreaks, markets, distribution areas etc. In longer-term settlements, space for gardening is also included Communitym2/personTotal nb of personTotal site area in m2N/ABaseline<15 15-30 31-45 >45In high-density settlements the significance of WASH problems tends to be greater. Person-to-person contact and the likelihood of disease transmission increases, and the space available for WASH facilities and for people to practice hygiene comfortably and safely is reducedN/AN/AKey informantC2 Population information management, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, (R) Early Recovery, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health
Water Sanitation HygieneW 7-5W7 Aggravating FactorsNb of people on the siteThe number of people on the site is the number of people residing continuously at the site and does not include people who may be registered at the site but who are not physically present, as in the case of a village with scattered outlying houses. CommunityNumber of peopleN/AN/ADisaggregation by sex Baseline>10000 5000-10000 1000-5000 <1000The larger the settlement, the greater the importance of WASH because of the number of people affected and because of the impact of deficiencies in WASH provision. Very large settlements such as urban areas and large camps create particular problems for WASH: it is more difficult to control environmental health risks, establish community-based hygiene promotion activities and promote community participation in the management of facilities. Very large settlements may also place unsustainable demands on limited natural resources, including water resources, and create a large burden of waste to be managed in the local environment. Data should be collected from key informants in the camp management and camp coordination cluster. The figure for number of people on the site may be verified with data used by the shelter and nutrition clusters for distributions, and estimates from surveys. Figures in the score range may need to be adjusted to reflect national or local norms and patterns of settlement.N/AN/AKey informantC2 Population information management, (R) Early Recovery, H6 Environmental Health
Water Sanitation HygieneW 7-6W7 Aggravating FactorsShelter ConditionsUnsanitary shelter conditions include the following: - lack of adequate ventilation, smoke pollution (e.g.HouseholdqualitativeN/AN/AN/ABaseline1) Less than 2 m2 of covered floor area per person and unsanitary shelter conditions 2) Less than 2 m2 of covered floor area per person or unsanitary shelter conditions 3) Between 2 m2 and 3.5 m2 of covered floor area per person and sanitary shelter conditions 4) At least 3.5m2 of covered floor area per person and sanitary shelter conditionsSeek data from key informants in the camp management and camp coordination cluster. Shelter conditions may be verified visually during a household survey, transect walk or other method. Where there is a large variation in shelter conditions for a population on the same site (for example, where some people have remained in their houses and others have moved into a school following a cyclone), an average score should be estimated for the total population concerned and a note made on the variation in conditions in the 'notes' box.N/AN/AKey informantS1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, (R) Early Recovery, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health
Water Sanitation HygieneW1-1W1.1 Hygiene itemsProportion of households possessing soapUse of soap in handwashing helps to reduce diarrhoeal transmission. Although substitute such as ash may be as effective, soap encourages handwashing. Make sure it is present at household level is an important public health intervention. HouseholdPercentageTotal nb of households in the sampleNb of households possessing soapN/ABaseline, OutputNoSPHEREFollow-up of trends. Target: 100%It is important to see the soap to verify its presence in the household. If the respondent cannot locate and show the soap within a minute or so, this probably means that it has been borrowed from another household and should be discounted.N/ADepending on contexts and intercluster cooperation, this indicator can be easily adapted for schools / child friendly spaces, feeding centres, as well as for health facilitiesHousehold surveyH1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, S2.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter
Water Sanitation HygieneW1-10W1.2 Hygiene PracticesProportion of households where food is safely stored, prepared and consumedSafe food practice involves three main precautions: (1) clean all surfaces in contact with food: wash hands before food preparation and eating, wash cooking and eating utensils, (2) use safe ingredients: use safe water and foodstuffs, wash fresh foods to be eaten raw, (3) store food safely: protect from flies, separate raw and uncooked foods, avoid storing leftovers or cooking a long time before eating. HouseholdPercentageTotal number of households in the sampleNb of household where all three precautions are metN/ABaseline, OutcomeYesSPHEREFollow-up of trends. Target: 100%Ascertain where food and water for the kitchen are obtained from. Observe conditions in the cooking area and check whether sufficient utensils and cooking facilities are available to enable safe food practice. Cross-check with other indicators for data on handwashing and use of safe water. Questions to be asked: The last time you prepared food, what steps did you go through? Is there any food left from the last time you cooked? How long ago did you prepare the food? Can you show me where you keep this food? Observe if the containers are covered.N/AN/Ahousehold surveyN1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, (R) Early Recovery, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, F7 Utilization, E1 Access and Learning Environment, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance
Water Sanitation HygieneW1-11W1.2 Hygiene PracticesProportion of pregnant women, children under five and other vulnerable people sleeping under effective insecticide-treated mosquito netsInsecticide-treated nets are nets for hanging over sleeping places, treated with an insecticide that repels, disables and kills mosquitoes coming into contact with them. Conventionally treated nets are effective if they have been retreated correctly within the last six months (or the last yea the case of some chemicals), not washed more than three times since the last treatment and without holes or tears.CommunityPercentageTotal number of pregnant women and children under five (or total number of people) in the households visitedNb of pregnant women and children under five (or number of people) reported to sleep under effective insecticide-treated net in the households visitedSADDBaseline, OutcomeWASH ClusterIn many contexts people will not have access to safe drinking water for part or all of the emergency period, for example when they rely on traditional unprotected water sources or when central systems for water treatment and distribution fail. In these cases, household (or point-of-use) treatment is important for ensuring that water is clean at the point of consumption. Surveyors should check to ensure that all the necessary supplies and equipment are present. For example, if bucket disinfection is used, an additional water container, usually a bucket with a lid, will be required for the process, in addition to containers for collection and storage. Model questions for survey: Do you treat your water in any way to make it safer to drink? IF YES, what do you usually do to the water to make it safer to drink? Did you treat the water that is being used in your household today? IF NO, why not? May I see the product or device please?It is important to see the nets installed in the household and check who actually sleeps under the nets. Possible questions: are there any pregnant women or under-five children in this household? IF 'YES', do you have a mosquito net in your household? IF 'YES', who usually sleeps under it? Can I see the net(s)? Observe the nets: is the net hanging above a bed / sleeping mat ? Does it hand in such a way that is do not allow gaps for mosquitoes to enter? Does the net see to be in good conditions ? Ask how old is the net / when was it last retreated?N/AN/Ahousehold surveyH1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, (R) Early Recovery, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, S2 Shelter-related NFI, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance
Water Sanitation HygieneW1-2W1.1 Hygiene itemsProportion of households possessing at least one clean narrow-necked or covered water container for drinking-waterNarrow-necked or covered water containers include jerricans and buckets with tight-filling lid and tap or pouring hole, so as to prevent people (including children) from putting their hands or contaminated objects into the container. Container should be clean in the sense of being free from visible dirt and should have been washed within the last week. HouseholdPercentageTotal nb of households in the sampleNb of households possessing suitable water containerN/ABaseline, OutputNoSPHEREFollow-up of trends. Target: 100%Before starting the survey, surveyors should look at the types of water containers typically being used and agree on what they will record as acceptable and unacceptable containers. If the container has not been washed within the past week but there is no visible dirt, which may often be the case if the container is relatively new or the water supply is clear and chlorinated, it should be recorded as clean. If it is observed that suitable water containers are present in the household but are not in use or are being used for other purposes such as storing food, surveyors should discuss this to find out why. Unless there are important reasons why the container is not used for drinking water then it should be recorded as present. For more rapid assessment, a survey of water containers brought to water-collection points could substitute for a household survey although here may not be a representative sample of water containers at any water point.N/AN/AHousehold surveyH3 Communicable diseases, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, S2.1 Access, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, S2.2 Assistance, H6 Environmental Health
Water Sanitation HygieneW1-3W1.1 Hygiene itemsAverage total capacity of water collection and storage containers at household levelWater collection and storage containers may include a range of sizes and types of container, including traditional containers, containers made from recycled materials and manufactured containers such as jerricans. Total capacity is the volume, in litres of all the water containers available for collection and storage in the household. HouseholdLitresN/AN/AN/ABaseline, OutputNoSPHEREN/AEstimate the total capacity (volume) of the water containers for each household in the survey. Add all volumes recorded and divide by the number of households surveyedN/AN/AHousehold surveyH1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, F7 Utilization
Water Sanitation HygieneW1-4W1.1 Hygiene itemsProportion of households with appropriate water treatment supplies and equipmentWater-treatment supplies and equipment includes chemicals for flocculation and disinfection, filter systems and equipment and fuel for boiling. Equipment and supplies are appropriate where they are already known by the population concerned or where they are simple enough for the people concerned to use them safely and effectively with the instructions provided. HouseholdPercentageTotal nb of households in the sampleNb of households possessing appropriate water-treatment suppliesN/ABaseline, OutputSPHEREFollow-up of trends. Target: 100%In many contexts people will not have access to safe drinking water for part or all of the emergency period, for example when they rely on traditional unprotected water sources or when central systems for water treatment and distribution fail. In these cases, household (or point-of-use) treatment is important for ensuring that water is clean at the point of consumption. Surveyors should check to ensure that all the necessary supplies and equipment are present. For example, if bucket disinfection is used, an additional water container, usually a bucket with a lid, will be required for the process, in addition to containers for collection and storage. Model questions for survey: Do you treat your water in any way to make it safer to drink? IF YES, what do you usually do to the water to make it safer to drink? Did you treat the water that is being used in your household today? IF NO, why not? May I see the product or device please?N/ADepending on contexts and intercluster cooperation, this indicator can be easily adapted for schools / child friendly spaces, feeding centres, as well as for health facilitiesHousehold surveyE1 Access and Learning Environment, F7 Utilization, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health
Water Sanitation HygieneW1-5W1.1 Hygiene itemsAccessibility of appropriate sanitary protection materials for menstruation, and underwear, for women and girlsAppropriate sanitary protection materials are the materials that women and girls are accustomed to using in normal circumstances, in sufficient quantities and of an acceptable quality. Convenient and private places for washing and drying reusable cloths may also be necessary in some circumstances. Widespread lack of access means that it is difficult or impossible to get access to materials because they are simply not available or not affordable.IndividualYes/NoN/AN/AN/ABaseline, OutputNoSPHEREN/ANormal methods for procuring sanitary protection materials for menstruation may be disrupted by a disaster and, where washable cloths are used, facilities for washing and drying cloths correctly and privately may be lacking. The resulting lack of access to appropriate materials and underwear may lead to situations of embarrassment and distress, affecting girls and women's access to education, economic or social activities. In some cases,it increases the risk of infectious disease through the reuse of incorrectly washed and dried cloths and underwear. In order to get information on the availability of sanitary protection and on the type of female hygiene material being used in the community, focus group discussions should be conducted with adolescent gitls and women of reproductive age, preferably broken down by age , including, where deemed important, female members of ethnic or religious minorities. Due to the sensitive nature of the issue, the consultation should be carried by a female staff member.N/AN/AFocus group discussionE1 Access and Learning Environment, S2.1 Access, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, S2.2 Assistance, H6 Environmental Health
Water Sanitation HygieneW1-6W1.1 Hygiene itemsProportion of households possessing one or more effective insecticide-treated mosquito netsInsecticide-treated nets are nets for hanging over sleeping places, treated with an insecticide that repels, disables and kills mosquitoes coming into contact with them. They may be of ordinary netting that is periodically retreated with insecticide, or they may be long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLIN's), with the insecticide within or bound around the fibres of the netting.HouseholdPercentageTotal nb of households in the sampleNb of household possessing one or more effective insecticide-treated mosquito netsN/ABaseline, OutputSPHEREFollow-up of trends. Target: 100%In malarial areas, people are able to protect themselves from malaria if they possess one or more effective nets for sleeping under. The most vulnerable people in the household are likely to be pregnant women and under-five children anybody whose immunity to malaria is suppressed by infectious disease or malnutrition. There should be sufficient net available to protect these vulnerable people as a minimum. WHO recommends full coverage for all people at risk of malaria where insecticide-treated nets are used for malaria prevention. Nets that are unused, including any that are in unopened packages, should be included. This indicator measures possession of nets, not use. Surveyors may wish to learn why nets are not used, in order to inform hygiene-promotion activities.N/AN/AFocus group discussionH3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition
Water Sanitation HygieneW1-7W1.2 Hygiene PracticesProportion of households where only safe water is used for drinking and cookingSafe water is defined as water that: (1) comes from a protected and/or treated water supply and/or is treated at household or point of use; (2) is collected and stored in clean covered or narrow-necked containers; (3) is transferred safely during collection at the water point, when transferring from collection containers to storage, (4) containers and when transferring to containers used for drinking or cooking HouseholdPercentageTotal nb of households in the sampleNb of households where all three criteria of safe water are metN/ABaseline, OutcomeYesSPHEREFollow-up of trends. Target: 100%Ascertain where water for drinking and cooking is collected from and check whether or not any other water sources are used. Observe the presence, type and state of water containers, which should be cleaned at least once per week to be considered clean. Where household or point-of-use treatment is required, ask to see the water-treatment equipment a products used and, if chlorine-based treatment is used, check if there is a free chlorine residual in the water. Model questions for survey: What is the main source of drinking water for members of this household? Do you ever drink water from other sources? If YES, which ones? May I see the containers you use for collecting water, please? Do you store water for drinking in the household? If YES, may I see the containers, please? Observe and check if the containers are covered. Who takes water from these containers? How do you remove water from the drinking water container? What do you use to remove water? Are the water containers cleaned? When were they cleaned last? Do you treat your water in any way to make it safer to drink? IF YES, what do you usually do to the water to make it safer to drink? When did you treat your drinking water the last time using this method? If water is treated by a method other than boiling, may I see the product or device? If blench, chlorine or tap water, test water for free chlorineN/AThe proportion of household is also an indicator on the proportion of people using safe water, indicator which can be then desagregated by sex and age.Household surveyC3.2 Service Provision - WASH, (R) Early Recovery, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, F7 Utilization, E1 Access and Learning Environment, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding
Water Sanitation HygieneW1-8W1.2 Hygiene PracticesProportion of men, women, boys and girls who last defecated in a toilet (or whose faeces was last disposed of in a safe manner)A hygienic toilet is a facility that is designed, located, built and managed in such a way that users can conveniently ensure their excreta is contained, isolated and/or treated so that it is not a source of contamination. Typical hygienic toilets include standard types of pit latrine, composting toilets, chemical toilets and flushing toilets with water-borne sewerage or septic tanks, as well as more basic traditional systems used in low-density settlements. CommunityPercentageTotal Nb of individuals in the household sampleNb of individuals who last defecated in a hygienic toiletdisaggregated by sex and ageBaseline, OutcomeYesSPHEREFollow-up of trends. Target: 100%It is difficult to get reliable information about the actual use of toilets during a household survey. It is useful to crosscheck survey data with voting proportions from a pocket chart exercise in a focus-group discussion where people can indicate privately what their hygiene practices are. Model questions for survey: 1) at present, where do adult members of this household go to the toilet? Where do children in this household go to the toilet? Are women's, girls' , boys'and men's practices different? If so, why (i.e. lack of hygiene awareness or protection & dignity issues preventing certain household members from using the latrines)? If children go to the toilet on the floor or in a nappy, what is done with the faeces? Observe if there is faces around the living areaN/AN/AHousehold surveyH1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, (R) Early Recovery, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, E1 Access and Learning Environment, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding
Water Sanitation HygieneW1-9W1.2 Hygiene PracticesProportion of men, women, boys and girls washing hands with water and soap or substitute after contact with faeces and before contact with food and waterThis indicator does not measure actual handwashing, as observed in practice or as a demonstration by respondents: this may not be feasible or appropriate in many emergency situations. Respondents' reports of having used soap or a substitute for handwashing at critical times in the past 24 hours is an alternative. Substitutes for soap are wood ash and clean soil or sand. Contact with faeces includes changing babies, picking up children's faeces and changing and cleaning people in care. CommunityPercentageTotal nb of people surveyed in the sampleNb of people reporting having washed their hands with soap or substitute after contact with faeces and before contact with food and waterdisaggregated by sex and ageBaseline, OutcomeYesSPHEREFollow-up of trends. Target: 100%There are two elements to this indicator: 1. handwashing at critical times; 2. use of soap or substitute (which is a proxy for correct handwashing). A positive result should only be reported if both are mentioned by the respondent. Respondents should first be asked if they have soap or a substitute, then asked if they have used it over the previous hours and if so, what for. Surveyors should check answers against the following list of critical times for handwashing, without prompting the respondent there may be other times mentioned (like when washing clothes or dishes): 1) after defecating, 2) after handling children's faeces or wiping/washing a child's bottom, 3) after handling faeces or wiping/washing the bottom of a sick or elderly relative AND 1) before drawing water, 2) before preparing food 3) before feeding children or sick or elderly relative, 4) before eating. Model questions for survey: Do you have soap / ash / sand for handwashing? If YES, have you used it today or yesterday? If YES, what did you use it for? Probe to find out when.N/AH1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding, (R) Early Recovery, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, E1 Access and Learning Environment, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, F7 Utilization
Water Sanitation HygieneW2-1W2.1 Access and Water QuantityQuantity of water used per person per day for drinking, cooking, hygiene and laundryThe quantity of water used per person per day includes all the water collected at public water points, water supplied via household connections water used for laundry or bathing collected from surface water sources or used in situ, rainwater collected at household level etc. Use for drinking, cooking and hygiene includes bathing and laundry but excludes use for livestock, gardening, construction etc. CommunityLitres per personn/an/aN/ABaseline, OutputNoSPHEREContext specificFor each household surveyed, estimate the total volume of the water used per day and ascertain the number of people that household. Add all the daily household use figures and divide by the total number of people belonging to the households in the survey. Alternatively, estimate the total volume of water used per day for each household surveyed, add all the daily household use figures and divide by an estimate of average household size in the population concerned. It is important to try to find out all the sources of water that are being used for drinking, cooking and hygiene, including those that are used at source (e.g. washing clothes at a river). For more rapid assessment, a survey among people at water-collection points could be used, though this may provide biased sample, for instance where surface water sources provide a substantial part of the water used or where some people do not have access to the water-collection points.N/AN/Ahousehold surveyC3.2 Service Provision - WASH, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, F7 Utilization, E1 Access and Learning Environment, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition
Water Sanitation HygieneW2-2W2.1 Access and Water QuantityLikelihood of a critical fall in the quantity of water available per day within the next monthIt is important to assess the likelihood of a critical fall (temporary or permanent) in water availability on the short term to determine whether or not action needs to be taken to secure supplies or to look for other alternatives to ensure that the population continues to have access to sufficient water for health and livelihoods CommunityVery likely / Somewhat Likely / Unlikelyn/an/aN/ABaselineNon/aA critical fall in water availability is defined as a fall that would lead to a reduction in the quantity of water used for drinking, cooking and hygiene below an acceptable level for protecting health. This may also involve a reduction in the quantity of water used for essential livelihoods activities. Water available is the quantity water per person per day that is potentially accessible to the population concerned. Availability may be reduced by events such as falling availability of local water resources at the end of the rainy season, mechanical, financial, logistics or other problems with a managed water-supply system, an increase in the population on sites, security incidents that interrupt a water-tankering operation etc.Published data such as hydrological and hydrogeological records, and programme reports may also be available.N/AKey informant, observation(R) Early Recovery, F7 Utilization, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, E1 Access and Learning Environment, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition
Water Sanitation HygieneW2-3W2.1 Access and Water QuantityAverage time required (minutes) for one water collection journey, including travel in each direction and queuingTo limit the amount of survey questions asked, it would be sufficient to inquire only about the source of the drinking-water and the time needed for the collection. This may be justified if it can be assumed that most households use the same source for drinking and nondrinking-water. If this is not the case, the source and the time needed to collect the water should be assessed in a separate set of questions because the amount of water not used for drinking determines how much water is available for hygiene purposes.HouseholdMinutesn/an/aSex and age disaggregation possibleBaseline, OutcomeNoSPHEREContext specificTo limit the amount of survey questions asked, it would be sufficient to inquire only about the source of the drinking-water and the time needed for the collection. This may be justified if it can be assumed that most households use the same source for drinking and nondrinking-water. If this is not the case, the source and the time needed to collect the water should be assessed in a separate set of questions because the amount of water not used for drinking determines how much water is available for hygiene purposes. For more rapid assessment, a survey among people at water-collection points could be used. Model questions for survey How long does it take you to go to your main water source, get water, and come back?N/AN/AHousehold surveyC3.2 Service Provision - WASH, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F7 Utilization, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition
Water Sanitation HygieneW2-4W2.2 Water QualityProportion of households with access to a source of safe drinking-waterSources of safe drinking-water include boreholes, protected wells and protected springs, adequately treated and prope distributed surface water and rainwater collected on clean surfaces and properly stored. Safe drinking-water is defined by the World Health Organization as water that 'does not represent any significant risk to health over a lifetime of consumption, including different sensitivities that may occur between life stages.HouseholdPercentageTotal nb of households in the sampleNb of households with access to a source of safe drinking-waterN/ABaseline, OutcomeNoIn many contexts people will not have access to safe drinking water for part or all of the emergency period, for example when they rely on traditional unprotected water sources or when central systems for water treatment and distribution fail. In these cases, household (or point-of-use) treatment is important for ensuring that water is clean at the point of consumption. Surveyors should check to ensure that all the necessary supplies and equipment are present. For example, if bucket disinfection is used, an additional water container, usually a bucket with a lid, will be required for the process, in addition to containers for collection and storage. Model questions for survey: Do you treat your water in any way to make it safer to drink? IF YES, what do you usually do to the water to make it safer to drink? Did you treat the water that is being used in your household today? IF NO, why not? May I see the product or device please?It is important to establish in each household whether sufficient safe drinking-water is available for drinking and cooking for all household members. If this is not the case then the result should be recorded as negative. Ensure that respondents clearly identify water that is used for drinking and cooking. Water used solely for laundry and bathing may not need to be of the same quality. Check the water sources mentioned by the respondents in the survey to verify their condition. Where relevant and possible, carry out water-quality analysis and checking of treatment processes. Model questions for survey What is the main source of drinking-water for this household? Do you collect drinking-water from any other sources?Review Data from Joint monitoring Programme1) The proportion of household is also an indicator on the proportion of people with acces to a source of safe drinking water, indicator which can be then desagregated by sex and age. 2) Depending on contexts and intercluster cooperation, this indicator can be easily adapted for schools / child friendly spaces, feeding centres, as well as for health facilitieshousehold survey, direct observationC3.2 Service Provision - WASH, E1 Access and Learning Environment, F7 Utilization, (R) Early Recovery, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition, N2 Infant and Young Child Feeding
Water Sanitation HygieneW2-5W2.3 Water FacilitiesAccess to appropriate bathing facilitiesThis indicator is expressed in qualitative terms, but some quantitative data may be used, such as the number of people per public bathing cubicle or the number of households with a bathing place. CommunityNone / limited / sufficientN/AN/ADisagregation by sex of the # of communal bathing facilities availbale, respecting a ratio of 6 doors for women and 4 doors for menBaseline, OutcomeNoSPHEREContext specificAppropriate bathing facilities may include bathrooms, showers and other bathing areas at household level, or communal facilities where this is not possible or not the preferred option for the population. To be appropriate, they must be accessible to all users, provide sufficient privacy and safety, have a convenient supply of water and be easy to maintain a clean and hygienic state, including the correct disposal of wastewater. Communal facilities need to be separated by sex, respecting a ratio of 6 doors for women against 4 doors for men, differentiated with use of a pictogramm, lockable from the inside and with light. In order to be safe, their location and their design should be determined based on the needs expressed by the female and male users. Sufficient access is a level of access that allows people to bathe as frequently as they would under normal circumstanceN/AN/AKey informant, focus group, observationC3.2 Service Provision - WASH, (R) Early Recovery, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, S1 Shelter, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition
Water Sanitation HygieneW2-6W2.3 Water FacilitiesAccess to appropraite laundry facilitiesThis indicator is expressed in qualitative terms, but some quantitative data may be used, such as the number of people per public washing basin. The scoring range for this indicator only goes as far as '2', which reflects its relative lack of importance compared with most other indicators. CommunityNone / limited / sufficientN/AN/AN/ABaseline, OutcomeNoSPHEREContext specificAppropriate laundry facilities may include equipment (buckets, basins etc.) at household level, suitable locations by the side of water bodies (avoiding the risk of contaminating drinking-water) where this is normal practice, or communal. Appropriate laundry facilities. To be appropriate, they must be accessible to all users, provide sufficient safety, have a convenient supply of water and be easy to maintain in a clean and hygienic state, including the correct disposal of wastewater. The issue of private laundry areas for women and girls to wash and dry under-garments and sanitary cloths is addressed in the following indicator: Accessibility of appropriate sanitary protection materials for menstruation, and underwear, for women and girls. Sufficient access is a level of access that allows people to wash clothes and bedding as frequently as they would under normal circumstances.N/AN/AKey informant, focus group, observationC3.2 Service Provision - WASH, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, (R) Early Recovery, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition
Water Sanitation HygieneW3-1W3.1 EnvironmentPresence of human faeces on the ground on and around the sitePresence should clearly be the result of recent scattered defecation by a significant number of people. One isolated stool does not constitute a substantial presence. CommunityYes/NoN/AN/AN/ABaseline, OutcomeYesSPHERENo PresenceSurveyors should look for the obvious places where people may go to defecate on the ground. Faeces that were clear deposited more than a few days ago should not be counted; only recently deposited faeces indicate an ongoing problem of access to toilets. Organised open defecation areas that are too close to water sources and living areas or that do not provide adequate protection from contamination should be counted as substantial presence.N/AN/AObservationC3.2 Service Provision - WASH, S1.1 Access, E1 Access and Learning Environment, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition
Water Sanitation HygieneW3-2W3.2 Toilet FacilitiesAverage number of users per functioning toiletA functioning toilet is one that is fully constructed, in working order, of a type and in a location acceptable to intended users. This definition excludes toilets that do not adequately protect users living areas, drinking-water sources and use from contamination, latrines that are full, toilets that are too dirty to use, toilets with broken superstructures, toilets that are inaccessible or located where people are embarrassed to use them etc. CommunityPerson per ToiletEstimated or counted number of functioning toiletsEstimated population at the sitePossible disaggregation by sex and ageBaseline, OutputYesSPHEREContext specificThe number of users per functioning toilet is a crude indicator of the extent to which people have access to toilets, which is important for preventing the spread of faecal diseases. This indicator does not identify actual access to the toilets availableN/AN/AKey informant, observationC3.2 Service Provision - WASH, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, E1 Access and Learning Environment, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition
Water Sanitation HygieneW3-3W3.2 Toilet FacilitiesProportion of households with access to a functioning toiletA functioning toilet is one that is fully constructed, in working order, of a type and in a location acceptable to intended users. This definition excludes toilets that do not adequately protect users living areas, drinking-water sources and use from contamination, latrines that are full, toilets that are too dirty to use, toilets with broken superstructures, toilets that are inaccessible or located where people are embarrassed to use them etc. Access is defined by the intended users of the toilets.Household and FacilitiesPercentageTotal number of households in the same locationNb of households reporting access to a functioning toiletPossible disaggregation by sex and ageBaseline, OutcomeYesSPHEREIn many contexts people will not have access to safe drinking water for part or all of the emergency period, for example when they rely on traditional unprotected water sources or when central systems for water treatment and distribution fail. In these cases, household (or point-of-use) treatment is important for ensuring that water is clean at the point of consumption. Surveyors should check to ensure that all the necessary supplies and equipment are present. For example, if bucket disinfection is used, an additional water container, usually a bucket with a lid, will be required for the process, in addition to containers for collection and storage. Model questions for survey: Do you treat your water in any way to make it safer to drink? IF YES, what do you usually do to the water to make it safer to drink? Did you treat the water that is being used in your household today? IF NO, why not? May I see the product or device please?It is important to measure whether or not people in the population concerned actually have access to a functioning toilet. Access may be limited by a number of technical and social reasons. This indicator describes the extent to which people can relieve themselves comfortably and with dignity, and the extent to which they can avoid contaminating the living environment and drinking-water sources. Where communal latrines are in place, it is advisible to consult separatly women and men about their access to functioning toilets. Model questions for survey Do all the members of this household have access to a functioning toilet? IF NOT, how many household members do have access, and how many do not for any reason?Review Data from Joint monitoring Programme1) The proportion of household is also an indicator on the proportion of people with access to a functioning toilet, indicator which can be then desagregated by sex and age. 2) Depending on contexts and intercluster cooperation, this indicator can be easily adapted for schools / child friendly spaces, feeding centres, as well as for health facilities. For these facilities, it is of the utmost importance to disagragate data per sex.household surveyC3.2 Service Provision - WASH, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition
Water Sanitation HygieneW3-4W3.2 Toilet FacilitiesProportion of toilets with functioning and convenient handwashing facilitiesFunctioning handwashing facilities consist of an adequate and continuous supply of water, with means to wet hands before using soap and then rinse them in clean water after. Convenient handwashing facilities mean that they are located next to the toilet, or at the household where they can be reached directly and within a matter of seconds from the toilet CommunityPercentageTotal nb of toilets surveyedNb of toilets with functioning and convenient handwashing facilities (or observed during toilet survey or reported during household survey)N/AOutputNoSPHEREIn many contexts people will not have access to safe drinking water for part or all of the emergency period, for example when they rely on traditional unprotected water sources or when central systems for water treatment and distribution fail. In these cases, household (or point-of-use) treatment is important for ensuring that water is clean at the point of consumption. Surveyors should check to ensure that all the necessary supplies and equipment are present. For example, if bucket disinfection is used, an additional water container, usually a bucket with a lid, will be required for the process, in addition to containers for collection and storage. Model questions for survey: Do you treat your water in any way to make it safer to drink? IF YES, what do you usually do to the water to make it safer to drink? Did you treat the water that is being used in your household today? IF NO, why not? May I see the product or device please?If different household members use different toilets, presence or absence of handwashing facilities should be recorded for each toilet used. Only the main toilet used by each household member should be included in the survey (e.g. if people use a household toilet but sometimes use a public toilet in the market, only the household toilet should be included). Toilet survey (observation) : Where predominantly or exclusively public or communal toilets are used, it may be more convenient to do a survey of toilets and inspect them to check the presence or absence and condition of handwashing facilities. Model questions for survey IF HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS REPORT HAVING ACCESS TO A FUNCTIONING TOILET Is there a place for you to wash your hands after using the toilet? Is there always soap and water available? How long does it take to go from the toilet to the place for washing hands?N/AN/Ahousehold surveyC3.2 Service Provision - WASH, (R) Early Recovery, E1 Access and Learning Environment, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition
Water Sanitation HygieneW3-5W3.2 Toilet FacilitiesProportion of toilets that are cleanClean toilets are those that are free from faeces inside and around the structure itself, including the squatting plate. Toilets where there are traces of faeces, urine or anal cleansing materials from careless use or incomplete cleaning should be considered clean, as opposed to those with stools inside or outside. Toilets that have a very strong bad smell inside may also be considered dirty by users and if so should be defined as dirty for this indicator. CommunityPercentageTotal nb of toilets surveyedNb of clean toiletsN/AOutputNoSPHEREIn many contexts people will not have access to safe drinking water for part or all of the emergency period, for example when they rely on traditional unprotected water sources or when central systems for water treatment and distribution fail. In these cases, household (or point-of-use) treatment is important for ensuring that water is clean at the point of consumption. Surveyors should check to ensure that all the necessary supplies and equipment are present. For example, if bucket disinfection is used, an additional water container, usually a bucket with a lid, will be required for the process, in addition to containers for collection and storage. Model questions for survey: Do you treat your water in any way to make it safer to drink? IF YES, what do you usually do to the water to make it safer to drink? Did you treat the water that is being used in your household today? IF NO, why not? May I see the product or device please?Cleanliness of toilets can be checked during a household survey or a dedicated toilet survey (particularly where there are many public toilets not associated with specific households). Toilets that are clean because they are clearly not in use should not be included in the sampleN/AN/AObservationC3.2 Service Provision - WASH, E1 Access and Learning Environment, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition
Water Sanitation HygieneW4-1W4 Vector ControlDegree of vector-borne disease riskMalaria: Malaria is one of the major causes of disease and loss of life in emergencies. This indicator is designed to estimate the risk of malaria to the population concerned in general terms, taking into account the following factors: 1) whether or not the area is endemic for malaria; 2) whether or not it is the malaria season; 3) the degree of immunity of the population; 4) the adequacy of measures in place to control malaria transmission.CommunityHigh / Not HighN/AN/AN/ABaseline, OutcomeSPHEREN/ASeek data from health professionals, vector-control specialists and malaria specialists in ministry of health, NGOs, Red Cross/Red Crescent, WHO etc.Explore prevalence and incidence ratesN/AKey informant, ObservationH1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, E1 Access and Learning Environment, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition
Water Sanitation HygieneW4-2W4 Vector ControlProportion of households adopting measures to reduce biological vector-borne disease riskThis indicator can be seen as a compilation of several indicators related to hygiene practices, mainly, the indicators W1-6, W1-8, W1-10 and W1-11. If , in an household, these four indicators are met, it can be considered, that the measures to reduce biological vector-bonre disease risks have been taken. HouseholdPercentageTotal nb of households in the sampleNb of households adopting measures to reduce biological vector-borne disease riskN/ABaseline, OutputSPHEREFollow-up of trends. Target: 100%See general guidance for indicators W1-6, W1-8, W1-10 and W1-11.N/AN/Ahousehold survey, focus group, observation(R) Early Recovery, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, E1 Access and Learning Environment, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition
Water Sanitation HygieneW5-1W5 Solid Waste ManagementPresence of solid waste on and around the siteSubstantial presence is a somewhat subjective judgment, but to classify as such, it should clearly indicate a pattern of habitual disposal of solid waste in an uncontrolled way, or in a controlled but unsafe way (for example, piles of waste to accumulate at street corners). A few scattered plastic bags do not constitute a substantial presence. If the amount of solid waste on the ground has increased significantly due to the crisis, this should also be considered. CommunitySubtantial presence / No Substantial PresenceN/AN/AN/ABaseline, OutcomeSPHEREN/AThe presence of substantial quantities of solid waste on the ground, particularly near living areas and drinking-water sources creates a risk to public health through faecal contamination (as solid waste may often contain children's faeces and animal faeces), the creation of vector breeding sites (for mosquitoes, rats, flies etc.), fire hazard etc. The distance of 30 m from shelters and water points reflects established guidance on minimum safe distances for protection of drinking-water sources from faecal contamination.N/AN/AObservationC3.2 Service Provision - WASH, E1 Access and Learning Environment, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health
Water Sanitation HygieneW5-2W5 Solid Waste ManagementPresence and effectiveness of a solid-waste management systemAn effective solid-waste management system is one that ensures the following: 1)people have a convenient and hygienic place to deposit waste (at household level or in public spaces such as mark distribution centres etc.); 2) waste does not create a significant nuisance or health risk during the period before collection; 3) waste is collected regularly (at least weekly); 4) waste is disposed of at a site and in a way that does not create a nuisance or a health risk.CommunityFully Operational / Partly Operational / Not OperationalN/AN/AN/ABaseline, OutputSPHEREN/AHumanitarian crises may create situations where large quantities of waste are not managed, either because the wastemanagement system is damaged or destroyed or because people are displaced into settlements where there are not established waste management systems. In dense, large settlements, this may quickly cause a build-up of waste in the settlement, with associated public health risks.N/AN/AKey Informant, Focus Group, Observation(R) Early Recovery, R2 Basic Infrastructure Restoration, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, E1 Access and Learning Environment, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance
Water Sanitation HygieneW8-1W8 WASH Programme Design and ImplementationAll groups within the affected population have equitable access to WASH facilities and servicesGroups within the affected population may include, but not be limited to, men and women of different ages, children, people from different social, economic, livelihoods and ethnic groups, people living with HIV/AIDS, people with chronic illness, single-headed households, child-headed households and people with disabilities. Different groups may be defined by their different needs, vulnerabilities and capacities.Met/ Partly Met/ Not NetN/AN/ABreakdown of single sex group discussions conducted with women/girls, boys/men and with vulnerable groups of the populationBaseline, OutcomeYesSPHEREN/AData should be collected through focus-group discussions with different groups from the population concerned, and from key informants in the Camp Coordination and Camp Management cluster and other clusters. This qualitative indicator requires careful measurement, including discussion with a range of informants to make an objective judgment. It is important to take into consideration how conditions change over time, if this indicator is measured during monitoring or periodic review processes, and use the results at local level to encourage improvement. This indicator is important to measure during assessment as well as monitoring, to identify any groups that are exclude from access to WASH facilities and services and who may therefore be particularly at risk.N/AN/AKey informant, focus groupC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, E1 Access and Learning Environment, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG6 Prevention Programming, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition
Water Sanitation HygieneW8-2W8 WASH Programme Design and ImplementationThe WASH response includes effective mechanisms for representative and participatory input from all users at all phasesRelevant mechanisms include the use of participatory assessment methods, seeking an understanding of the social diversity of the affected population and the interests of key stakeholders, representation arrangements such as community WASH committees that reflect the range of needs, vulnerabilities and capacities of different groups in the population, and joint planning and monitoring of facilities and services. All phases of the WASH response include the following: assessment, planning, design and location of facilities, training, monitoring and evaluation.CommunityMet/ Partly Met/ Not NetN/AN/ANumber of women, girls, boys and men consulted and/or represented in WASH committeesOutcomeYesSPHEREN/AData should be collected through focus-group discussions with different groups from the population concerned, and from key informants in the Camp Coordination and Camp Management cluster and other clusters. This qualitative indicator requires careful measurement, including discussion with a range of informants to make an objective judgment. It is important to take into consideration how conditions change over time, if this indicator is measured during monitoring or periodic review processes, and use the results at local level to encourage improvemenN/AThis indicator allows monitoring of equitable access, participation and distinct outputs of the assistance provided:Key informant, focus groupC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, C3.9 Service Provision - WASH &/or Shelter, E1 Access and Learning Environment, (R) Early Recovery, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, S2.1 Access, S2.2 Assistance, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG6 Prevention Programming, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition
Water Sanitation HygieneW8-3W8 WASH Programme Design and ImplementationThe affected population takes responsibility for the management and maintenance of facilities as appropriate, and all groups contribute equitablyWhere possible, it is good practice to form water and/or sanitation committees, made up of representatives from the various user groups and half of whose members are women. The functions of these committees are to manage the communal facilities such as water points, public toilets and washing areas, be involved in hygiene promotion activities and also act as a mechanism for ensuring representation and promoting sustainability.CommunityMet/ Partly Met/ Not NetN/AN/Adisaggregated by sex and ageBaseline, OutcomeNoSPHEREN/AData should be collected through focus-group discussions with different groups from the population concerned, and from key informants in the Camp Coordination and Camp Management cluster and other clusters. This qualitative indicator requires careful measurement, including discussion with a range of informants to make an objective judgment. It is important to take into consideration how conditions change over time, if this indicator is measured during monitoring or periodic review processes, and use the results at local level to encourage improvement.N/AN/AKey informant, focus groupC1 Community engagement and self-empowerment, C3 Protection and services monitoring and coordination, C3.2 Service Provision - WASH, E1 Access and Learning Environment, (R) Early Recovery, R3 Capacity Building, R4 Governance, S1.1 Access, S1.2 Assistance, H1 General clinical services & essential trauma care, H3 Communicable diseases, H6 Environmental Health, P1 (PC) Child Protection, P2 (PG) Gender-Based Violence, PG6 Prevention Programming, P3 (PL) Housing Land and Property, P5 Vulnerability, P6 Displacement and Return, N1 Prevention and Management of Acute Malnutrition