Indicators

Global Clusters Code Sub-domain Title Description
Water Sanitation Hygiene W1-9 W1.2 Hygiene Practices Proportion of men, women, boys and girls washing hands with water and soap or substitute after contact with faeces and before contact with food and water

This indicator does not measure actual handwashing, as observed in practice or as a demonstration by respondents: this may not be feasible or appropriate in many emergency situations. Respondents' reports of having used soap or a substitute for handwashing at critical times in the past 24 hours is an alternative. Substitutes for soap are wood ash and clean soil or sand. Contact with faeces includes changing babies, picking up children's faeces and changing and cleaning people in care.

Water Sanitation Hygiene W2-1 W2.1 Access and Water Quantity Quantity of water used per person per day for drinking, cooking, hygiene and laundry

The quantity of water used per person per day includes all the water collected at public water points, water supplied via household connections water used for laundry or bathing collected from surface water sources or used in situ, rainwater collected at household level etc. Use for drinking, cooking and hygiene includes bathing and laundry but excludes use for livestock, gardening, construction etc.

Water Sanitation Hygiene W2-2 W2.1 Access and Water Quantity Likelihood of a critical fall in the quantity of water available per day within the next month

It is important to assess the likelihood of a critical fall (temporary or permanent) in water availability on the short term to determine whether or not action needs to be taken to secure supplies or to look for other alternatives to ensure that the population continues to have access to sufficient water for health and livelihoods

Water Sanitation Hygiene W2-3 W2.1 Access and Water Quantity Average time required (minutes) for one water collection journey, including travel in each direction and queuing

To limit the amount of survey questions asked, it would be sufficient to inquire only about the source of the drinking-water and the time needed for the collection. This may be justified if it can be assumed that most households use the same source for drinking and nondrinking-water. If this is not the case, the source and the time needed to collect the water should be assessed in a separate set of questions because the amount of water not used for drinking determines how much water is available for hygiene purposes.

Water Sanitation Hygiene W2-4 W2.2 Water Quality Proportion of households with access to a source of safe drinking-water

Sources of safe drinking-water include boreholes, protected wells and protected springs, adequately treated and prope distributed surface water and rainwater collected on clean surfaces and properly stored. Safe drinking-water is defined by the World Health Organization as water that 'does not represent any significant risk to health over a lifetime of consumption, including different sensitivities that may occur between life stages.

Water Sanitation Hygiene W2-5 W2.3 Water Facilities Access to appropriate bathing facilities

This indicator is expressed in qualitative terms, but some quantitative data may be used, such as the number of people per public bathing cubicle or the number of households with a bathing place.

Water Sanitation Hygiene W2-6 W2.3 Water Facilities Access to appropraite laundry facilities

This indicator is expressed in qualitative terms, but some quantitative data may be used, such as the number of people per public washing basin. The scoring range for this indicator only goes as far as '2', which reflects its relative lack of importance compared with most other indicators.

Water Sanitation Hygiene W3-1 W3.1 Environment Presence of human faeces on the ground on and around the site

Presence should clearly be the result of recent scattered defecation by a significant number of people. One isolated stool does not constitute a substantial presence.

Water Sanitation Hygiene W3-2 W3.2 Toilet Facilities Average number of users per functioning toilet

A functioning toilet is one that is fully constructed, in working order, of a type and in a location acceptable to intended users. This definition excludes toilets that do not adequately protect users living areas, drinking-water sources and use from contamination, latrines that are full, toilets that are too dirty to use, toilets with broken superstructures, toilets that are inaccessible or located where people are embarrassed to use them etc.

Water Sanitation Hygiene W3-3 W3.2 Toilet Facilities Proportion of households with access to a functioning toilet

A functioning toilet is one that is fully constructed, in working order, of a type and in a location acceptable to intended users. This definition excludes toilets that do not adequately protect users living areas, drinking-water sources and use from contamination, latrines that are full, toilets that are too dirty to use, toilets with broken superstructures, toilets that are inaccessible or located where people are embarrassed to use them etc. Access is defined by the intended users of the toilets.

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